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Clarkson Autolock Mystery Tool

Anyone know what I've got!

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Oily Rag05/05/2020 19:37:34
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img_2885.jpgimg_2884.jpgHi Guys, Hope everyone is staying safe.

As we all seem to be doing a little 'housekeeping' in the enforced lockdown I have discovered a long lost item that was given to me by a retired engineer from the Clarkson Factory in Nuneaton.

The problem is that I don't know what it is - other than an Autolock 40 Int chuck. But it has an adjuster which is calibrated by 0.02mm divisions. I suspect that the adjuster alters the centre pin, which engages in the back of the normal Clarkson type threaded cutter, to set the tool protrusion from the chuck. This would probably mean it is Clarksons attempt to emulate 'qualified' tooling for emerging CNC machines with minimal change to their stock list. Just a guess that, anyone got any other ideas?

There are some markings faintly etched on the straight potion of the shank which states:-

40 INT

BRPAT

30371 /69

England

I take it the BRPat means British Patent 30371 / 69 with the 69 signifying 1969 year. I've done a patent search but so far not been succesful in turning anything up for this number.

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Michael Gilligan05/05/2020 20:28:24
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16632 forum posts
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30371 /69 may be an Application Number, rather than a granted Patent Number

Finding those is much more difficult ... but I will have a go

MichaelG.

Oily Rag05/05/2020 21:14:32
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Thanks Micheal, appreciate any information on this.

Kiwi Bloke05/05/2020 21:40:50
480 forum posts
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'I suspect that the adjuster alters the centre pin, which engages in the back of the normal Clarkson type threaded cutter, to set the tool protrusion from the chuck.'

Yes, that's it. They were originally used on NC machines, with tool automatic changers.

Dick H05/05/2020 22:11:26
95 forum posts
1 photos

From Espacenet

Bibliographic data: GB1335367 (A) ― 1973-10-24

CHUCKS

Page bookmark GB1335367 (A) - CHUCKS
Inventor(s):
Applicant(s): CLARKSON INTERNATIONAL TOOLS L +
Classification:
- international: B23B31/20; (IPC1-7): B23B31/04
- cooperative:
Application number: GBD1335367 19690616
Priority number(s): GB19690030371 19690616


Abstract of GB1335367 (A)

Tooltip
First page clipping of GB1335367 (A)

1335367 Chucks CLARKSON INTERNATIONAL TOOLS Ltd 14 Sept 1970 [16 June 1969] 30371/69 Heading B3B A tool-holding chuck includes a tool-locating part 26 slidably mounted in the chuck body to control the axial position of the tool, a rotatable adjusting ring 34 in screw-threaded engagement with the tool-locating part, and means, such as apertures for reception of a suitable tool, on the adjusting ring accessible through an opening 18 in the body for rotating the ring to control the axial position of the tool-locating part. The adjusting ring carries suitable graduations visible through the opening 18. A rear surface of ring 34 abuts a shoulder 17 in the body. A head portion 25 of tool-locating part 26 is held against rotation by engagement of a slot therein about a screw 19. The head has a conical stop 27 which engages a depression in the tool shank 23. The latter is gripped by a split collet 22 which is tightened by axial movement of a sleeve 21 due to rotation of a nut 11. Alternatively, a nut (38) (Fig. 4, not shown) with a bevelled portion, engages the collet (40) directly. The chuck is self-tightening.

Michael Gilligan05/05/2020 22:16:05
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16632 forum posts
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Well found, Dick

MichaelG.

Dick H05/05/2020 22:33:49
95 forum posts
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Patents were my old playground. US application no.s are trickier.

Oily Rag05/05/2020 22:34:35
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88 photos

Thank you Kiwi and Dick,

Thought that it was something to do with qualified tooling given the date assumption of 1969. Dick, the patent document is helpful as I'm trying to work out how to disassemble the sleeve (21) - it is pretty tight in the body and needs to come out to insert the 'normal' Clarkson split collet (22)

Must be quite rare as I've never seen one of these before.

Just turned up another tool in the same box of 'goodies' from the same guy - this tool looks to be a recessing tool mounted on a 2MT shank driven from a front slip ring, I'll take some photo's and details off it tomorrow.

Michael Gilligan05/05/2020 23:08:07
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16632 forum posts
724 photos
Posted by Dick H on 05/05/2020 22:33:49:

Patents were my old playground. US application no.s are trickier.

.

I use espacenet a lot ... but always seem to struggle with application numbers

Any hints would be welcomed.

“The number assigned to a patent application at the time of filing. The application number (or filing number) is generally made up of a country code, the year of filing and a serial number of variable length.“

... sometimes doesn’t seem to get me far.

MichaelG.

Dick H06/05/2020 10:38:34
95 forum posts
1 photos

Searching patents is a bit of an art. Transposing application no.s, i.e. getting the application no. into the right format for Espacenet is tricky, older Japanese documents with emperor years as dates, US serial codes that cover several years. Espacenet will accept wildcards but you have to specify the field. Often it is a problem to pad out the number with the correct no of leading zeroes. You also have to know whether it is a priority or a straight application no. A good start point is to have a look at the publication data on the front page of a published application or patent and try and make sense of the various numbers and then try and find the document again using other tags (priority instead of application or publication no.)

Michael Gilligan06/05/2020 11:11:26
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16632 forum posts
724 photos

Thanks, Dick yes

I had assumed this particular one should be easy, but GB196930371 returned no results

[ and, yes, I also tried padding with extra zeroes ]

... I was using the iPad and the new espacenet screen, if that’s relevant

MichaelG.

Geoffrey Wright06/05/2020 12:18:55
8 forum posts
3 photos

Good Morning Gents,

Hope you are all well and keeping busy!

Sorry to change the topic here, but you are all chatting about Clarkson fittings, and I wondered if any of you could assist me here. This is a photo (I just took from my PC screen as it had to be Jpeg!) of a Beaver Mill, which I have, with a drill chuck. which I assume is the standard Clarkson 30 Int taper. I usually use the Myford drill chuck, set into a Clarkson 2 MT fitting, but this then becomes quite long and limits the size of the drill I can use.

My question is, are these drill chucks available/obtainable anywhere? Obviously I'd like to get hold of one.

Thanks for reading this and apologies again for butting in here.

Geoff

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Dick H06/05/2020 16:22:50
95 forum posts
1 photos

MichaelG.

Try pr = gb19690030371.

pr is priority.

DC31k06/05/2020 16:53:45
281 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by Geoffrey Wright on 06/05/2020 12:18:55:

...a Beaver Mill, which I have, with a drill chuck. which I assume is the standard Clarkson 30 Int taper. I usually use the Myford drill chuck, set into a Clarkson 2 MT fitting, but this then becomes quite long and limits the size of the drill I can use.

My question is, are these drill chucks available/obtainable anywhere?

Geoff,

It is a little difficult to answer your question as you are using terminolgy in a non-standard way.

The taper in the mill is 30 INT, also known as NMTB 30, ISO 30 and most generically as '30 taper'. It has nothing whatsoever to do with Clarkson, who were a manufacturer of tooling. Clarkson-made tooling is available in many different tapers.

Your description of using the Myford chuck sounds like you have a 30 taper (male) to 2 Morse taper (female) adaptor.

Your drill chuck itself will have a female Jacobs taper in it, known as a JT (possibly, if it is quite modern, it may have a B-series taper). So the Myford chuck you have has a 2 Morse to xx JT arbor poked in the back of it.

To mount a drill chuck into the 30 taper spindle, you need a 30 taper (male) to appropriate Jacobs taper (male) adaptor. It is not normal to swap drill chucks between arbors, so if you want to use a drill chuck in both the Myford and the mill, you need two chucks and two arbors.

As an example of the breed, have a look at:

https://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalogue/Chucks/Drill-Chuck-Arbors/ISO30-Drill-Chuck-Arbors

Michael Gilligan06/05/2020 17:26:11
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16632 forum posts
724 photos
Posted by Dick H on 06/05/2020 16:22:50:

MichaelG.

Try pr = gb19690030371.

pr is priority.

.

Aha !!

Thank you ... I will experiment this evening

[ currently on garden duty ]

MichaelG.

Watford06/05/2020 18:17:07
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135 forum posts
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Posted by Michael Gilligan on 06/05/2020 17:26:11:

Aha !!

Thank you ... I will experiment this evening

[ currently on garden duty ]

MichaelG.

Splendid mental picture of Michael gardening with a well engineered bracket on the spade holding his laptop rose

Mike

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