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wide guide conversion

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Philip Burley10/04/2020 21:10:08
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185 forum posts
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has anyone done this wide guide conversion? The latest article shows a strip of gauge plate fitted at the back , but the Ganderton system does not need it . I cant quite see why it should be needed , as the back of the bed is machined and the inside of the back of the saddle has a machined surface . Both unused since new

regards Phil

Neil Wyatt10/04/2020 22:27:22
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Posted by Philip Burley on 10/04/2020 21:10:08:

has anyone done this wide guide conversion? The latest article shows a strip of gauge plate fitted at the back , but the Ganderton system does not need it . I cant quite see why it should be needed , as the back of the bed is machined and the inside of the back of the saddle has a machined surface . Both unused since new

regards Phil

My understanding is that without it you may struggle to get the leadscrew to align properly with the apron, if the saddle moves forwards too much.

Neil

Hopper10/04/2020 23:22:51
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4654 forum posts
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The reason I used the strip of gauge plate, following the example many years ago of JA Radford's ME article, was it did not require the use of a milling machine to remove the original narrow guide material as in the Ganderton method. Plus it gives a nice bearing surface of steel to cast iron rather than cast iron against cast iron. And can be replaced if it wears out in the future (will be beyond my time!).

Moving the leadscrew will be needed in either case I think. I machined the leadscrew mounting brackets down to move it inwards. I'd suppose with the Ganderton method you would pack the same items with shim to move them outwards.

I'm very happy with the result of my conversion. The lathe performs as good as new now, without regrinding the bed. Well worth doing -- by either method.

Pete B.

mgnbuk11/04/2020 10:31:20
781 forum posts
61 photos

Moving the leadscrew will be needed in either case I think. I machined the leadscrew mounting brackets down to move it inwards. I'd suppose with the Ganderton method you would pack the same items with shim to move them outwards.

I'm very happy with the result of my conversion. The lathe performs as good as new now, without regrinding the bed. Well worth doing -- by either method.

Not come across the "Ganderton system", but in a similar manner to Hopper I Loctited a strip of 1/16" x 1/2" gauge plate the full length of my Super 7 saddle shortly after I got the machine, as it was facing convex due to excessive wear on the short saddle guide face caused by poor gib strip adjustment.

After adding the strip, the lathe faced very slightly concave as it should & I have not had to make any further gib adjustments. There was sufficient free play in the apron mounting screw holes to align the half nuts without having to adjust the screw brackets on my machine. Adding the strip was a very easy fix to my saddle problem.

Nigel B.

ega11/04/2020 12:29:55
1750 forum posts
152 photos

I did the conversion many years ago - broadly similar to mgnbuk's experience. Fortunately, I did not have to move the leadscrew which would have been complicated as it passes through the gearbox.

I agree that JAR's method seems unduly complex but he deserves great credit for being prepared to modify his lathe and for sharing his work with the rest of us.

Philip Burley11/04/2020 12:52:07
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185 forum posts
1 photos

Finished mine this morning before it got too warm I used the gauge plate strip method , mainly because it didn't involve butchering the cross slide in case i wanted to return it (if there was no improvement ) The half nuts engage with out difficulty . possibly because of the general wear and tare . As its a gear box model , moving the lead screw is impossible anyway

Very happy with the result , goes from one end to the other without tightening and seems to turn better , Too warm in there for further tests at moment

Phil

Peter Sansom11/04/2020 14:26:29
71 forum posts
2 photos

I futted teh gause plate a just over a year a go. No issues with the lead screw alignment

Peter

ega11/04/2020 16:43:00
1750 forum posts
152 photos
Posted by Hopper on 10/04/2020 23:22:51:

The reason I used the strip of gauge plate, following the example many years ago of JA Radford's ME article, was it did not require the use of a milling machine to remove the original narrow guide material as in the Ganderton method ...

Re-reading the JAR article as re-printed in his book, it seems that his method did involve machining back the centre step face on his "plano-mill".

Anyone contemplating this modification might well benefit from reading this even if the full JAR method is not to be followed.

Ady112/04/2020 07:47:44
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3734 forum posts
519 photos

A couple of other posts on this conversion

**LINK**

**LINK**

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