By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

How can I remove this mould from painted surface?

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
choochoo_baloo02/04/2020 01:05:15
avatar
241 forum posts
43 photos

I left my astrophotography gear under cover outside for the winter nonths - a mistake I know.

When uncovering I found mould had grown on the powder coated (?) telescope tube. See photos below.

Any recommendations on how to clean it?

From Internet searches it seems bleach with a toothbrush is a good way to go, but thought I should get some extra advice before driving in! Thanks in advance.

mold1.jpeg
Mold2.jpeg

Hopper02/04/2020 05:36:08
avatar
4404 forum posts
93 photos

Here in the tropics where we get 8 feet of rain a year snd things tend to go a bit mouldy we generally use a mix of household detergent and bleach. Bloke i pay to do the outside of my house swears by it too .

pgk pgk02/04/2020 07:03:26
1729 forum posts
287 photos

Dilute vinegar would probably work too..many moulds are sensitive to pH

pgk

Mike Poole02/04/2020 08:56:10
avatar
2544 forum posts
60 photos

HG mould spray is very effective but vile if you breath it in, probably just a bleach though.

Mike

Dave Halford02/04/2020 09:33:06
698 forum posts
6 photos

Bleach does not kill mould, it just bleaches it. Anything sold as a mould killer won't be just bleach.

pgk pgk02/04/2020 09:57:45
1729 forum posts
287 photos

A quick punt about on Google suggests that bleach does kill mould but only on the surface whereas vinegar is more likely to penetrate a porous surface? Reality is that neither is likely to deal with mould spores so in an indoors situation where mould and it's spores are a human hazard one would need a much more active, specilised approach but on a single item like this probably either would work.

I have a problem with botrytis on my citrus when i put them into winter quarters every year due to lack of ventilation and higher humidity. If I proactively spray them with something that prevents the spores growing then everything is OK. If I leave it until the spores are geminating then it gets out of hand rapidly. Copper is another useful toxin as bordeaux mixture but leaves the blue colour.

ogk

Neil Wyatt02/04/2020 10:04:34
avatar
Moderator
17722 forum posts
697 photos
77 articles

Is that a WO scope?

Tut! Tut! Slapped wrists!

Neil

Bizibilder02/04/2020 10:05:31
avatar
68 forum posts
7 photos

That looks like a decent scope so don't attack it with bleach! Best to try simple warm soapy water and a soft cloth first - you can give it a good rub but don't damage the paint. If that doesn't clear it try isopropanol - you can get that via the internet. Keep well away from Meths/white spirit etc as they will almost certainly damage the paintwork.

Samsaranda02/04/2020 10:19:25
avatar
908 forum posts
5 photos

PGK, I think Bordeaux Mixture is now banned in all European countries, I think eventually we will only be able to use plain water, it’s health and safety gone mad, I blame the EU they have been responsible for “sanitising” all our treatments. A pet issue of mine is the treatments that are now allowed on timber, if you buy fence posts now you are lucky if they last more than two years once in the ground, they just rot away; I have a fence that I put up 25 years ago and it is still solid, no rot at all. Sorry to side track the posting.
Dave W

Circlip02/04/2020 10:25:06
1088 forum posts

" When uncovering I found mould had grown on the powder coated (?) telescope tube "

Polyester powder? If so, it shouldn't be used for external usage. Solution, use Epoxy powder or don't leave outside.

Regards Ian.

Perhaps contact with scope manufacturer would help?

Edited By Circlip on 02/04/2020 10:26:44

pgk pgk02/04/2020 10:45:48
1729 forum posts
287 photos
Posted by Samsaranda on 02/04/2020 10:19:25:

PGK, I think Bordeaux Mixture is now banned in all European countries, I think eventually we will only be able to use plain water, it’s health and safety gone mad, I blame the EU they have been responsible for “sanitising” all our treatments. A pet issue of mine is the treatments that are now allowed on timber, if you buy fence posts now you are lucky if they last more than two years once in the ground, they just rot away; I have a fence that I put up 25 years ago and it is still solid, no rot at all. Sorry to side track the posting.
Dave W

I make my own bordeaux for that reason. It's a few citrus trees rather than a commercial plantation. I'll also admit to using sulphur to 'sterilise' my greenhouse at the end of season. Sulphur candles are also banned but you can still buy sulphur granules to acidify soil and it burns just fine in the greenhouse but needs precautions.

The fence post issue affects me too. Ideally one would buy sweet chestnut posts.. why I've got several trees from seed growing for future owners of this farm.

pgk

Dave Halford02/04/2020 11:07:41
698 forum posts
6 photos

When you read Google carefully it mostly says hard surfaces, as in glass, metal and glazed surfaces of tiles which will clean with a cloth anyway.

Most coatings have a porous bit which is why moulds get into gloss paint and silicone sealer.

Linky this is as good as any link

In the OP's case there's apparently no mould on the hard anodised surfaces, just the powder coat, so it may have grown into the coating. There nothing to stop trying bleach, it may reduce the black but it will grow back given half a chance.

Martin Hamilton 102/04/2020 14:45:24
168 forum posts

I tried all the usual mold removal products including HG mold removal & none were that good, this was for the black mold you get on the beads of silicon around the bath + around the silicon bead on PVC frames. Since found out the best way is with thick clear bleach removes all the mold, i dont use anything else now after finding out this was the best solution. You must leave the thick bleach on for at least 24 hours, it is best to put bleach on the area then lay toilet tissue over the bleached area & then add some more bleach onto the tissue & leave to soak for minimum 24 hours. Then simply wipe of with all the mold gone, i find this method keeps black mold away for a couple of years before any returns, dead simple to do & cheap as well. It must be clear thick bleach & not thin.

Martin Hamilton 102/04/2020 14:57:12
168 forum posts

By the way the thick bleach method is only for non porous surfaces.

John Paton 102/04/2020 15:02:05
avatar
268 forum posts
17 photos
Posted by Samsaranda on 02/04/2020 10:19:25:

PGK, I think Bordeaux Mixture is now banned in all European countries, I think eventually we will only be able to use plain water, it’s health and safety gone mad, I blame the EU they have been responsible for “sanitising” all our treatments. A pet issue of mine is the treatments that are now allowed on timber, if you buy fence posts now you are lucky if they last more than two years once in the ground, they just rot away; I have a fence that I put up 25 years ago and it is still solid, no rot at all. Sorry to side track the posting.
Dave W

The National Building Specification for wood preservative calls for it to be biodegradable. I consider that to be an Oxymoron so when you go to buy some wood preservative ask the supplier for a litre of Oxymoron and see what you get!

Martin Hamilton 102/04/2020 15:14:18
168 forum posts

By the way the thick bleach method is only for non porous surfaces.

Martin W02/04/2020 15:24:20
832 forum posts
29 photos

Hi

The best product I have used for the removal of black mould and the staining it produces is 'Kilrock BLAST AWAY Mould Remover'. While I don't know what the effect might be of applying it on the painted surface of your telescope I have used on a variety of surfaces including emulsion paints, oil based paints, various plastic surfaces, silicon sealant, acrylic sealants, bare plaster and have not noticed any detrimental effects to any of these surfaces. That said one of its constituents is clearly a bleaching agent similar to normal household bleach probably sodium hypochlorite. Not only does it remove all traces of the mould, including any staining, it also seems to actively inhibit regrowth especially on the more porous surfaces.

It might be worth testing some on a small inconspicuous area to see how quickly it removes the staining/spores and check if it has any detrimental effect on the coating. You can purchase as a liquid spray or brush on gel from various high street outlets or from ebay.

Usual disclaimers other than I have found it to be extremely effective and usually have some about just in case I find some mould about the place.

Hope this helps

Martin

SillyOldDuffer02/04/2020 15:35:48
5631 forum posts
1157 photos

Send that repulsively scrofulous telescope to me. It's a write-off, unworthy of any decent observatory. Being an oik I might just about be able to ignore the hideously distressed paintwork whilst stargazing in the dark...

face 1

Dave

Neil Wyatt02/04/2020 16:39:54
avatar
Moderator
17722 forum posts
697 photos
77 articles

Cillit Bang mould remover!

Just ask Barry!

Steviegtr02/04/2020 23:43:04
avatar
1163 forum posts
99 photos

Bi-carbonate of soda. Cleans mould from fridges & bathroom tiles.

Steve.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
ChesterUK
Ausee.com.au
Warco
Allendale Electronics
Eccentric July 5 2018
cowells
emcomachinetools
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest