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Resin 3D Printer first results.

Some photos and notes about early results in 3D printing.

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Ed Duffner23/03/2020 22:19:50
811 forum posts
91 photos

Evening all,

As per Fizzy's earlier request, here are a few photos of a couple of test prints on an Elegoo Mars resin 3D printer.

The two items shown are a Great Western 5-plank wagon body in O-Gauge and a spinner for a Hawker Hurricane in 1/24th scale. Both drawn up in Fusion 360 and exported as STL meshes.

There are a few things I need to address; understanding "supports" and possibly adding in extra solid areas of resin to be later removed.

Both parts took about 2 hours each to print. I have another wagon in the printer as I write this with finer layer build-up and supports. There were no supports in this first attempt and it appears to have gotten sticky around the edge of the wagon bed.

The spinner might have benefited from some kind of skirt to support the wide edge. It has a wavy line where it should obviously be flat.

Regards,
Ed.

_dsc0019.jpg

_dsc0019_01.jpg

The planks are 1.6mm thick.

_dsc0020.jpg

Holes appear to print quite well.

_dsc0026.jpg

I also modelled the plate that the spinner would mate to but only the supports for it came out. The plate somehow got disconnected and floated around in the resin.

_dsc0033.jpg

You can see the layers on the inside of the spinner which are accentuated by the camera flash. To the naked eye the layers are barely noticeable.

_dsc0039.jpg

Graham A23/03/2020 22:40:30
8 forum posts

Ed. PM sent.

Bazyle24/03/2020 00:55:53
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5575 forum posts
207 photos

Impressive detail in those rivets. What size are they, about 10thou?

Ed Duffner24/03/2020 01:20:52
811 forum posts
91 photos

Actually, they're meant to be bolts Bazyle. laugh Some of them came out ok.

They are 0.55mm AF.

Ed.

gwr_wagon_cad.jpg

Neil Wyatt24/03/2020 11:00:36
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18322 forum posts
718 photos
77 articles

Very nice although there seems to be a little warping.

I understand resin parts may be a little flexible until the resin fully cures in ambient UV light?

What was the layer height you use and how long did they take to print?

I do sense the need for an MEW article once normality returns!

Neil

Michael Gilligan24/03/2020 12:39:55
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16648 forum posts
725 photos
Posted by Ed Duffner on 24/03/2020 01:20:52:

Actually, they're meant to be bolts Bazyle. laugh Some of them came out ok.

.

So ... What thread are they devil

MichaelG.

Ian Skeldon 224/03/2020 13:05:28
490 forum posts
41 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 24/03/2020 12:39:55:
Posted by Ed Duffner on 24/03/2020 01:20:52:

Actually, they're meant to be bolts Bazyle. laugh Some of them came out ok.

.

So ... What thread are they devil

MichaelG.

Very quick, I like that laugh

Ed Duffner24/03/2020 14:57:33
811 forum posts
91 photos

Neil,

Yes the warping is apparently a known issue with the printer's Z axis. On my printer there is some shift in the Y axis (~0.5mm), even though it doesn't have a Y axis and the inital layer heights are inconsistent ...the first layers resemble puff-pastry.

There is an upgrade available to swap the rod type linear rail for a double rail and truck, Hi-Win kind of setup. But I'll see if I can engineer that out first.

This printer uses a UV light underneath an LCD screen to partly cure a layer of liquid resin. Each 'sliced' layer is masked from the UV light by switching on/off pixels on the LCD screen for 8 seconds (controllable in software). The very first layers are exposed for about 50 seconds to make sure they stick to the build plate.

When the model is taken out of the printer it needs further curing via either sunlight or a dedicated UV light source of 405nM, which is what I'm using.

The layer height for this print was 50 microns, 0.05mm and took about 2 hours to print.

----------

Michael, very small ! laugh

Ed.

jimmy b24/03/2020 18:14:00
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678 forum posts
40 photos

The quality is fantastic. Makes me want one!

Are their fumes etc with one of these?

Jim

Ed Duffner24/03/2020 18:41:26
811 forum posts
91 photos

Hi Jim,

Yes, for this printer, a respirator is required for both the resin and the cleaning of parts with Isopropyl alcohol or similar. Gloves too as the resin is pretty nasty stuff that we can develop a sensitivyt too if it touches the skin before it's cured.

There are resins which are water cleanable, but the dirty water then has to be dealt with in an environmentally friendly way.

Ed.

Rockingdodge24/03/2020 18:58:31
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247 forum posts
47 photos
Posted by Ed Duffner on 24/03/2020 14:57:33:

Neil,

Yes the warping is apparently a known issue with the printer's Z axis. On my printer there is some shift in the Y axis (~0.5mm), even though it doesn't have a Y axis and the inital layer heights are inconsistent ...the first layers resemble puff-pastry.

This is called elephants foot due to the extended time required on the initial layers, lifting the item up by 5mm and using supports, preferably with the Prusa slicer (and then export with supports into Chitubox) should cure that. Might need a bit of experimentation. Plenty on YouTube about it.

Roger

Ed Duffner24/03/2020 19:45:07
811 forum posts
91 photos

Thank you Roger,

I started another print a short while ago and have elevated the model about 10mm on heavy supports, with more in each corner. The second print I did last night failed because the model started to pull away from the build plate.

I noticed the detail in the rest of the model was better due to the printer's minimum layer height of 25 microns.

Ed.

Rockingdodge24/03/2020 22:13:12
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247 forum posts
47 photos

Try tilting it slightly, 5mm from the plate one end to 10 or 15 mm the other end, should reduce the suction from the fep on the lift. Temperature also plays a part, resin temp of 27c or warmer is best. and then play with the layer times if that doesn't work but only one change at a time. wink

Roger

Edited By Rockingdodge on 24/03/2020 22:13:55

Ed Duffner10/04/2020 12:00:19
811 forum posts
91 photos

Good day, hope you're all doing ok.

After finding some original wagon drawings online I abandoned my previous 3D model and set about drawing a full scale accurate under-frame with all the brackets, screw and rivet holes. I assembled it in fusion 360 and scaled down to 1/43.5 (Scale Seven). it's taken quite a few hours.

I continued on and made a couple of test prints of a sole-plate, complete with end bracket and rivets (it's the long beam that runs the length of a wagon), It's shown in the first photo below. The result was quite promising so I set up a print of the whole under-frame and loaded it into the printer.

Some 13.5 hours later no less, the print was ready. It was removed from the build plate, washed in IPA and removed from its supports. Due to careless impatience I managed to damage a couple of small areas but these can easily be repaired.

Ed.

 

Test print.

12tontp1.jpg

 

Finished printed frame.

12ton3.jpg

 

Drip drying.

12ton4.jpg

 

All supports removed.

12ton1.jpg

 

A close up which shows the structure of the print layers.

12ton2.jpg

 

A better close-up.

12ton5.jpg

Edited By Ed Duffner on 10/04/2020 12:08:29

Bazyle10/04/2020 13:12:58
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5575 forum posts
207 photos

That is amazing detail and precision. I imagine you could even make and allowance for the thickness of paint.

Rockingdodge10/04/2020 14:25:53
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247 forum posts
47 photos

That looks really good Ed, impressive 360 work and the detail is great, well done. I must get back to my Mars and start making stuff again.

I did buy the Anycubic washer/ curer to help with the post processing, most impressed with the build quality.

I keep looking at the supports required and, being a tight wad, thinking what a waste of resin. laugh

Roger

Ed Duffner10/04/2020 14:36:00
811 forum posts
91 photos

Thank you Bazyle and Roger,

Yeah I was thinking the same, it's a very wasteful process. If the build area were bigger I could flatten the print more and save a lot of resin. This is only a one-off build though, just for fun and to get my feet wet with 3D printing.

I had an idea to construct some Tudor style buldings, but from Wurttemburg in Germany, in HO scale. I think this technology would be very good for that.

Ed.

Neil Wyatt10/04/2020 14:50:48
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Moderator
18322 forum posts
718 photos
77 articles

That's great. Main advantage I think is the complete absence of any stringing on such a part.

I have several things planned for when MEW 293 goes to bed (soon I hope!)

One is to finally get around to a 3.5" gauge version of the Airfix cement using 3D printed parts.

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