By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

What sort of things inspire you?

Share your possible model prototypes.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Neil Wyatt21/02/2020 17:37:27
avatar
Moderator
17355 forum posts
690 photos
77 articles

Saw this old breech loading coastal gun from Drake Island on the BBC news website today, woudl make a great model:

What sort of things get you contemplating new models?

Neil

Mick B121/02/2020 18:19:58
1435 forum posts
77 photos

Looks like an RML (Rifled Muzzle Loader) to me, possibly the 10-inch 18 ton job.

I've always wondered about the enormously thick reinforce on these pieces. Were they to resist pressure spikes caused by relatively fast-burning blackpowder propellant, when trying for armour-piercing velocities with Palliser-style projectiles far heavier than roundshot?

A subject like this, or a standard Napoleonic-period ship's gun or carronade (one of each in my album) , has the virtue of simplicity. But more modern pieces are much more interesting from the engineering point of view - for example Mal Webber's 8" howitzer in current build. But drawings of these guns are practically impossible to find, so the model engineer has to be prepared to undertake a formidable scaling and design exercise before cutting any metal, and not all of us have the time and commitment to do that.

In Churchill's old house at Chartwell, there's a model of the sponson-mounted 6-pounder gun used in early tanks. Looks like an ideal piece of work if the drawings -if any - could only be obtainable.

Edited By Mick B1 on 21/02/2020 18:21:16

Mike Poole21/02/2020 19:07:31
avatar
2436 forum posts
53 photos

I keep mulling over whether to have a go at making a Triumph trident T150 engine, I have the full size version so a ready source of information.

Mike

Bazyle21/02/2020 19:07:35
avatar
4992 forum posts
198 photos

Two posts and both on weapons of destruction, how sad.

One of our club members gave a talk last week about progress on his Stirling Single which is quite a popular loco but I much prefer the Dean Single and Johnson Spinners.

Bill Chugg21/02/2020 19:15:23
1262 forum posts
8 photos
Posted by Bazyle on 21/02/2020 19:07:35:

Two posts and both on weapons of destruction, how sad.

One of our club members gave a talk last week about progress on his Stirling Single which is quite a popular loco but I much prefer the Dean Single and Johnson Spinners.

Plus one from me on your first sentence. Single wheelers are all of interest , but somehow the Stirling just seems to come out on top in terms of attractiveness

To answer Neils original question, the 7.25 inch scale Big Boy that was at Dobwalls theme Park years ago, now in Australia I think.

Bill

JasonB21/02/2020 19:53:32
avatar
Moderator
17296 forum posts
1862 photos
1 articles

Oh dear where to start? Just looked at the various photos that I have in a file on the 'puter and see that there are 298 images though I do have several photos of some items.

These few are probaly towards the top of teh to be done list but the problem is more get added faster than even I can make themblush

No apology if a couple of those may cause offence due to their part in history but I just look at them as an interesting engineering itemsmiley

18.jpg

248172.jpg

c7dc9f62254abe8e95bd982cc2e41d57.jpg

colonial8.jpg

dsc00422.jpg

guadeloupemill13075.jpg

jewel1.jpg

lecky6.jpg

martiniquemill13117.jpg

thomasrose_vertical_7.jpg

Bill Chugg22/02/2020 08:01:57
1262 forum posts
8 photos
Posted by JasonB on 21/02/2020 19:53:32:

No apology if a couple of those may cause offence due to their part in history but I just look at them as an interesting engineering itemsmiley

Cannot see anything there to cause offence Jason. The lathe looks an interesting project. PM Research do a nice set of machine tool castings for a workshop. I did try one kit and made a right mess of it so gave up which is why I have just recently disposed of my workshop as my results were not good enough however hard I tried.

Bill

Danny M2Z22/02/2020 08:35:08
avatar
804 forum posts
282 photos

This bloke inspired me, What a legend! **LINK**

Buffer22/02/2020 09:00:53
140 forum posts
38 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 21/02/2020 17:37:27:

Saw this old breech loading coastal gun from Drake Island on the BBC news website today, woudl make a great model:

What sort of things get you contemplating new models?

Neil

Neil you will like what's on my drawing board at the moment then.

magpie22/02/2020 09:13:30
avatar
433 forum posts
80 photos

The TV ads for a model spitfire that will cost £1200.00, and take over 2 years to build. As I am now limited to a max 2 hours a day, if I am lucky, in my workshop, I thought there must be a better way to add movement to the model than the one in question. With that in mind, I have bought a plastic model spitfire, and I will enjoy finding a much better way to add movement to it. It will involve a minimum amount of lathe and mill time, because I can't stand for more than a few minutes at a time, but it will make use of a few of the many hundreds of small motors I have in my stores. Total cost should be no more that £40.00, quite a saving on the cost of the TV advertised one. wink 2

James Alford22/02/2020 09:20:17
370 forum posts
73 photos

The type of things which inspire and fascinate me are machines which are unnecessarily complicated and ridiculously elaborate, yet do very little: the type of contraptions from Heath Robinson and Emmett.

There was such a machine shown on Playschool once thorough the "round" window in the late 60s. I cannot remember what it was, but it left a lasting impression of flailing arms,cogs and wheels achieving very little, just because it could.

James

Edited By James Alford on 22/02/2020 09:22:44

Iain Downs22/02/2020 09:33:51
559 forum posts
444 photos

I like the idea of 'models' that can actually do something. So my current attempts to build a large model / small reality vertical engine.

Once that is done (in some decade in the future) I am toying with either a clock or a watchmakers lathe. Which will disappoint the OP of the converse post, no doubt. I had a bit of a flirtation with the idea of a watch, but, having watched (sorry) some You Tube videos, I suspect is beyond my competence - my manual coordination is not the finest.

I also want to do some casting at some point, but lack the space and facilties.

My final 'inspiration', I suppose, is some jewellery for SWMBO. Perhaps that might soften her heart towards the Art...

You will notice a common theme in all of this. I'm inspired by things I've never done, don't have any evidence of the skills required and which are rather hard.

Perhaps I'm not alone in that?

Iain

Mick B122/02/2020 09:39:08
1435 forum posts
77 photos
Posted by Bazyle on 21/02/2020 19:07:35:

Two posts and both on weapons of destruction, how sad.

 

Ordnance and tooling are twins of the same DNA, working and developing together since they were both flint handaxes.

Ya can't have one without the other.

Edited By Mick B1 on 22/02/2020 09:40:54

Hopper22/02/2020 10:05:32
avatar
4148 forum posts
89 photos

I find myself repeatedly inspired by the model engineers of the first half or so of the 20th Century, from ET Westbury though to GH Thomas. Most inspiring is the way those old boys did everything with almost nothing. Made their own dividing heads and just about all tooling etc.. Made their own racing tether boat engines for goodness sake. Just been reading ETW's build series in ME reprints for the Kiwi Mk2 engine. All done in the Myford lathe.

He describes drilling and boring the two holes in the timing chest for crankshaft and camshaft -- requiring a precision location so the drive gears don't bind or rattle around. He does it by marking the hole locations out with a scriber block and steel rule, then prick punching the intersecting lines and then setting up on the face plate with a wobbler to get hole location dead on. Not a DRO in sight. Not even a vertical slide with graduated feedscrew collar. Just careful marking out and workmanship. And it was rated as a beginner's project.

That's inspiring.

So much so I'm seriously looking at spending the stupid money to buy the Hemingway castings and get them shipped halfway round the world.

The other inspiring thing about stuff from that era is its style. That curvaceous art deco look of the 1930s is right there in ETW's KIwi engine, and in GHT's versatile dividing head that I have already made. Matched the style of the lathes of the day. Much more inspiring, to me, than today's piles of square blocks with sharp edges and corners loitering with intent to bust knuckles at first opportunity.

 

Edited By Hopper on 22/02/2020 10:10:58

Ron Laden22/02/2020 10:43:27
avatar
1715 forum posts
311 photos

No specific subject but seeing good engineering here on the forum, from simple items to more complex things which have a full description and pictures of how they were set up, tooling used and produced. As a relative beginner that inspires me, I have learnt such a lot from it.

Ron

Neil Wyatt22/02/2020 10:43:33
avatar
Moderator
17355 forum posts
690 photos
77 articles
Posted by James Alford on 22/02/2020 09:20:17:

The type of things which inspire and fascinate me are machines which are unnecessarily complicated and ridiculously elaborate, yet do very little: the type of contraptions from Heath Robinson and Emmett.

There was such a machine shown on Playschool once thorough the "round" window in the late 60s. I cannot remember what it was, but it left a lasting impression of flailing arms,cogs and wheels achieving very little, just because it could.

James

I remember seeing that, I later discovered it was one of the creations of Bruce Lacey:

Immortalised in song by one of my favourite bands too:

<edit> On reflection it may actually have been one by Wilf Lunn His machines were a bit more 'age appropriate'

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 22/02/2020 10:49:15

Ron Laden22/02/2020 10:44:21
avatar
1715 forum posts
311 photos

No specific subject but seeing good engineering here on the forum, from simple items to more complex things which have a full description and pictures of how they were set up, tooling used and produced. As a relative beginner that inspires me, I have learnt such a lot from it.

Ron

martin perman22/02/2020 12:31:17
avatar
1780 forum posts
75 photos

My inspiration came from my Grandfather, for over 60 years he made all sorts of things on his treadle lathe and would never allow my brother and I to put an electric motor on it, as very young boys we made wooden whistles on the lathe or fire up his two coal fired tugs and his 2" free style traction engine. My brother and I both took up engineering and both have workshops to make and tinker what we will because of him.

I'm also inspired by anything mechanical and particularly if it moves, yesterday I watched a Wheeler Dealers program about a Ford Cosworth 4 x 4 Escort they were sorting out, I was amazed to see that one of the drive shafts passed through the engine sump and oil to get to its front wheel, imagine the chap who thought of doing that and then convincing management that was the way to go.

Martin P

Guy Lamb22/02/2020 12:52:47
82 forum posts

Wilf Lunn was probably the 'super predictor' of Steam Punk,

Guy

Nick Clarke 322/02/2020 15:01:35
avatar
566 forum posts
15 photos

Inspiration has often to be well moderated by reality.

I have been fascinated by locomotives since too young to go to school. Watching what I now believe to be a 9F going through the cutting next to Bulwell Common is perhaps my earliest clear memory.

BUT I am not inspired to build a replica as my club track is ground level and small 7 1/4" is more practical than large 5", let alone 3 1/2"

Could I turn all of those wheels and build a boiler that big in the years remaining to me? - and as I haven't really looked slim since 1968 could I drive it if I did?

Sorry, much as I should love to build a 9F, the 7 1/4" Tich I am building, although progressing far more slowly than I would wish, inspires me because I can see I am likely to finish it and drive it after that!

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
emcomachinetools
cowells
Allendale Electronics
Warco
Eccentric July 5 2018
Ausee.com.au
ChesterUK
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest