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What bench drill

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Mike 9003/02/2020 11:37:49
23 forum posts
4 photos

At the moment Chester are selling there pillar and bench drills for £99, I’m interested in the D19, has anybody any thoughts on this machine, it seems to be a very good price, to good to miss in fact. I need the chuck to take at leased 1/2 drill bits.

Mike Poole03/02/2020 11:55:17
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Moderator
2816 forum posts
66 photos

Sadly it looks like only the D13 is at £99. The D19 is £326.

Mike

mechman4803/02/2020 12:01:49
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2797 forum posts
431 photos

Have a look at Machine Mart, usual disclaimer...

**LINK**

George.

IanT03/02/2020 12:19:09
1689 forum posts
163 photos

I purchased a 'cheap' benchtop drill from Lidl's a year or so back. Once home I assembled it and turned it on - quite apart from the terrible noise it made, the quill (when extended) could be pulled side to side by about 3mm - completely useless for my needs. It went straight back to the store and they refunded my money (with no hassle at all). I've wandered through various DIY sheds since and tried the quills on any small (e.g. cheap) drill presses I've seen and all of them had a lot of quill 'slop'.

Maybe the (cheaper) Chester drill is better but I suspect that they all probably come from the same factory. Depends on what you expect from your benchtop drill but if you want something that will drill small holes reasonably accurately in metal, then I think you will probably need to pay a bit more than the typical £80-90 small drill price for something good.

Regards,

IanT

ega03/02/2020 12:37:40
1870 forum posts
157 photos

It sounds as though the cheap Asian drill may have become cheaper over time: a friend gave me an old Astra import which had been condemned by his employers on account of the flange connecting the column to the base having cracked in service; this was easily replaced and, despite being rather noisy, it has given good service for some years. Checking the quill at full extension just now revealed no obvious side play.

The main limitation of these machines for me is the overhead in time of setting the speed; there seem to be rather few drills available with rapid speed change.

Mike 9003/02/2020 13:00:40
23 forum posts
4 photos

Thanks mike, I should have looked closer at the add, £326, is a bit to much for me, I’ve got about a £200 limit, has anybody got any recommendations at that sort of price, thanks.

Harry Wilkes03/02/2020 13:40:09
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1005 forum posts
63 photos
Posted by Mike 90 on 03/02/2020 13:00:40:

Thanks mike, I should have looked closer at the add, £326, is a bit to much for me, I’ve got about a £200 limit, has anybody got any recommendations at that sort of price, thanks.

For the price I'm happy with my Titan TT541DBT for screwfix link

Usual disclaimer

H

Dave Halford03/02/2020 18:14:43
1030 forum posts
9 photos

If it was me, I would avoid anything that mentioned wood or DIY in the write up.

Weighed less than 100lbs or it might be a bit bendy.

A low speed of more than 300ish rpm for that 1/2" drill.

Steviegtr04/02/2020 01:33:45
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1666 forum posts
207 photos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOzlfpaxHgU&list=PLqxEUtyoHqnI_1y_OHMsALTAT-utklw5o&index=2&t=3s

I bought the Aldi Pillar drill & it seems ok. It drills. It is noisy because it needs some deadening foam around the top cover. £59 online. Take a look at my review of it. No skits guys. I am trying.

 

Edited By Steviegtr on 04/02/2020 01:34:14

Edited By Steviegtr on 04/02/2020 01:35:24

thaiguzzi04/02/2020 05:17:54
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702 forum posts
131 photos
Posted by ega on 03/02/2020 12:37:40:

It sounds as though the cheap Asian drill may have become cheaper over time: a friend gave me an old Astra import which had been condemned by his employers on account of the flange connecting the column to the base having cracked in service; this was easily replaced and, despite being rather noisy, it has given good service for some years. Checking the quill at full extension just now revealed no obvious side play.

The main limitation of these machines for me is the overhead in time of setting the speed; there seem to be rather few drills available with rapid speed change.

+1. My Taiwanese bench drill (2MT, 16mm chuck, 3 pulleys 12 speed) was purchased new in 1982.

Drilled 1000's of holes inc a lot of big stuff like 19mm holes, used commercially in my UK pro workshop for 15 years, and is STILL GOING STRONG.

No slop in the quill, original bearings, original motor, changed the belts once.

Grown rather fond of the thing.

ega04/02/2020 11:27:20
1870 forum posts
157 photos

thaiguzzi:

Your machine may have been the elder and larger brother to mine which, according to its plate, was made in Taiwan in 1988.

Incidentally, my impression is that Taiwan is holding its own industrially vis a vis China.

Colin Heseltine04/02/2020 12:14:35
481 forum posts
146 photos

I would be looking at second hand Meddings, Pollard or Fobco or similar on EBay. I bought Fobco for £200 and it was in excellent condition

colin

John Paton 104/02/2020 17:53:47
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286 forum posts
17 photos

Plus 1 for Meddings second hand.

i bought mine second hand nearly 40 years ago, use it pretty well daily iincluding some heavy work and in its time light milling and routing.

Still no different to the day I bought it and it owes me nothing now.

Try and get one with rack and pinion to raise the table, not too many about but that feature is a godsend as you get older!

SillyOldDuffer04/02/2020 19:00:26
Moderator
6476 forum posts
1424 photos

Posted by IanT on 03/02/2020 12:19:09:.

...Depends on what you expect from your benchtop drill but if you want something that will drill small holes reasonably accurately in metal, then I think you will probably need to pay a bit more than the typical £80-90 small drill price for something good.

...

Can't disagree with that, and my cheap pillar drill doesn't get much use now I have a milling machine. But I wouldn't write off cheap pillar and bench drills quite so quickly because they're better than a hand-drill plus there's a technique that improves accuracy.

First, an accurately placed centre pop in the job is needed. With that as guide, a twist drill will align acceptably into the pop provided the operator allows the job to float into the drill's spinning axis. The trick is in taking a floppy approach rather than clamping everything down rigidly and expecting a bearing to keep the drill straight.

Important to hold the work so it can only move only sideways. The job still needs to be held in a machine vice with bolts tight enough to stop the whole lot taking off if the drill grabs.

However, I prefer my milling machine for accurate drilling - it requires less skill, is safer, and faster.

Dave

Bazyle05/02/2020 12:58:59
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5580 forum posts
207 photos

A low usage 30yr old far eastern drill can be quite a nice unit. I stored one for a club member a couple of years ago and was getting more jealous each time I went into the garage. If the quill is sloppy there was a modification published for making the operating arm spindle bushes a little eccentric to push it against the quill rack. Another mod was to put a brass push screw in at the front.

ega05/02/2020 14:42:39
1870 forum posts
157 photos
Posted by Bazyle on 05/02/2020 12:58:59:

A low usage 30yr old far eastern drill can be quite a nice unit. I stored one for a club member a couple of years ago and was getting more jealous each time I went into the garage. If the quill is sloppy there was a modification published for making the operating arm spindle bushes a little eccentric to push it against the quill rack. Another mod was to put a brass push screw in at the front.

In the same vein, you could turn up a close-fitting bush and screw it to the underside of the head casting to stabilise the quill.

old mart05/02/2020 21:53:37
2251 forum posts
165 photos

Having used these cheap drills, I don't regret just getting a reasonable drill stand for an ordinary corded drill with 2 speed gearbox. It does ok in my garage, and the power is much better.

Mike 9006/02/2020 19:23:08
23 forum posts
4 photos

I’ve been looking at the screw fix Titan TTB 541 DBT, bench drill and at 700w is quite powerful and looks to be a good machine for the price, £179.99, and thanks for the suggestion Harry, has anybody else got this machine and are they reliable,

Neil Wyatt06/02/2020 20:58:43
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Moderator
18327 forum posts
718 photos
77 articles

I had the really cheap MM one, and despite a distinctly loose quill I happily drilled hundreds of holes in PCBs and lots of much larger holes. Many dozens of 1/32" rivet holes in brass were a tad more demanding and I got through a pack of ten drills, although mostly because I wasn't able to clamp or support the sheet metal construction very well.

That said I now have a 16 speed MT2 MM one that dwarfed the old one, and it's really, really nice to use.

Neil

Martin of Wick07/02/2020 15:49:48
207 forum posts
4 photos

Trouble is, for some reason you expect the higher priced machines from the commercial importers to be better than the budget version of their ranges that we all have in the garage to do menial work. Having looked to upgrade for over a year at various machines in the £200 to £300 category, I came to the conclusion paying more only gets you a bigger drill, not a better one.

They are without fail characterised by any or all of the following; wobbly quills, off centre spindles or chucks, flexible columns the thickness of a baked bean can, inadequate mounting hardware, rough actions etc etc. And yes, you could probably remediate the deficiencies to some degree, but WTF - for some crazy reason I expect the product to work properly out of the box without requiring a full rebuild, at least for the first week. Sheesh! how hard can it be to get a good quill fit with todays manufacturing processes?

In the main, the current crop of general purpose far east drill machines are all of the same fundamentally bad design, badly implemented, but no doubt very cheap to produce and profitable for the manufacturers.

You then turn to the recycled brit-tool market and quietly despair at the collection of knackered old dogs on offer, but at least you go into that market fully expecting to carry out a rebuild. Be prepared to be aghast at the prices those dog eared specimens attract. I suppose if you can source or make the spares required you would end up with something worthwhile eventually, but it hardly seems worth the cost in blood and treasure.

nb. This is where someone usually chimes in about how they found a pile of unused Awesome Specials (or what ever) for a fiver each outside the local tech. Well good for you, but that doesn't help rest of us that have to keep vainly searching.

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