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Rear parting

Parting & centre

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Dell01/02/2020 12:03:57
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49 forum posts
13 photos

Hi all

just received rear parting tool from Cowells and upon installing parting tool even with as much packing as I can fit in, the cutting edge ( but on the bottom as it’s upside down) it is still 1.5 to 2 mm lower than the dead centre in tail stock, any suggestions?
Thanks in advance Dell

not done it yet01/02/2020 12:32:19
5786 forum posts
20 photos

You could put it the normal way up and run the lathe backwards - as long as the chuck cannot become detached, of course.

Or you could put some raising material under the tool post?

Can’t think of any easier ways.

Baz01/02/2020 12:51:00
524 forum posts
2 photos

Pretty obvious answer is to contact Cowells on Monday morning and tell them the problem, they should be able to provide you with an answer.

Dell01/02/2020 15:26:42
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49 forum posts
13 photos

Thanks for reply’s

I cannot run it backwards as the chuck on a Cowells 90ME is threaded so it would unscrew, and I have sent a email to Cowells.

not done it yet01/02/2020 15:52:01
5786 forum posts
20 photos

Thought about it again, just now. Another alternative would be a parting cutter (tool) some 2mm+ less than the one you have received.🙂

larry phelan 101/02/2020 15:58:56
975 forum posts
14 photos

I solved that problem many moons ago when I decided to go for rear toolpost parting off.. I simply made a toolpost to suit a wide range of cutters by providing plenty of room between the upper and lower guides.

It,s not pretty but is is rock steady and it works. I just pack it up as required.

old mart01/02/2020 21:03:45
2849 forum posts
181 photos

I made a rear parting toolpost for the Smart & Brown model A which takes industrial 26 and 32mm blades. The top half can be turned around and it is positioned right on the edge of the cross slide. No adjustment is required, as the carbide inserts are not ever sharpened. Because the forces are upwards, I also added a rear saddle lock, which was easy as the rear screw hole for the travelling steady was in exactly the right position, and the locking screw passes through the existing tapping in the saddle. The locking clamp is easy to remove if the travelling steady is used. It is visible in the picture.

_igp2502.jpg

John Baron01/02/2020 21:13:34
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445 forum posts
180 photos

31-07-2019x002.jpg

I made a "Norman patent" rear parting tool post and holder for my S7LB.

Phil P01/02/2020 22:22:41
768 forum posts
194 photos

This is my solution.

Parting Tool Holder 2

 

Parting Tool Holder 2

 

Parting Tool Holder 1

Phil

Edited By Phil P on 01/02/2020 22:24:24

Kiwi Bloke02/02/2020 00:35:05
525 forum posts
1 photos

Beware of putting severe tension loads on T-slots. John Baron's toolpost obviously hasn't caused the T-slot to break (yet...), and he has fitted a reasonably long nut. I think I'd use the longest nut I could fit and would ideally spread the load by fixing the post to the nut in more than one location. The Myford/Thomas style above takes the T-slot protection further by spreading the load between two slots. The quick-change holder then adds flexibility and moves the forces outside the footprint of the post. Nothing is ideal, is it?

Thor02/02/2020 05:12:18
1350 forum posts
40 photos

reartoolpost.jpg

My rear toolpost is similar to John Baron's, except mine is clamped to the cross slide using two nuts per T-slot.

Thor

Dell02/02/2020 09:04:18
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49 forum posts
13 photos

7e0afbed-5e2e-450b-8fbd-00956007bdb9.jpegThanks for replies
If I shim just the front only the leading edge will it be stable enough as I have put it in without shims and held it at an angle and it lines up.
Dell

1b7e7abe-1258-4fac-946d-a54bc3bb7cd7.jpeg

John Baron02/02/2020 09:44:02
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445 forum posts
180 photos
Posted by Kiwi Bloke on 02/02/2020 00:35:05:

Beware of putting severe tension loads on T-slots. John Baron's toolpost obviously hasn't caused the T-slot to break (yet...), and he has fitted a reasonably long nut. I think I'd use the longest nut I could fit and would ideally spread the load by fixing the post to the nut in more than one location. The Myford/Thomas style above takes the T-slot protection further by spreading the load between two slots. The quick-change holder then adds flexibility and moves the forces outside the footprint of the post. Nothing is ideal, is it?

Actually I agree with you ! I've seen Myford's with the "T" slots broken out, and not just the rear ones. I deliberately made the "T" nut a good fit and it goes right across the bottom of the post.

I did get another piece of steel to make another support block that goes over the post and is secured in the next "T" slot, the idea being that it would effectively increase the footprint and add support. Unfortunately I have not got round to making it yet. Other projects have got in the way.

JasonB02/02/2020 10:48:46
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Moderator
20283 forum posts
2218 photos
1 articles

Derek, The Cowells is intended to use 1/4" or less tools your combined blade and holder is approx 8mm that is why you can't get it high enough

Phil P02/02/2020 11:12:49
768 forum posts
194 photos

There looks to be a lot of overhang on that setup, just be aware that the tool and its holder will flex when taking a cut.

Phil

ega02/02/2020 11:15:50
2056 forum posts
167 photos
Posted by John Baron on 02/02/2020 09:44:02:
Posted by Kiwi Bloke on 02/02/2020 00:35:05:

Beware of putting severe tension loads on T-slots. John Baron's toolpost obviously hasn't caused the T-slot to break (yet...), and he has fitted a reasonably long nut. I think I'd use the longest nut I could fit and would ideally spread the load by fixing the post to the nut in more than one location. The Myford/Thomas style above takes the T-slot protection further by spreading the load between two slots. The quick-change holder then adds flexibility and moves the forces outside the footprint of the post. Nothing is ideal, is it?

Actually I agree with you ! I've seen Myford's with the "T" slots broken out, and not just the rear ones. I deliberately made the "T" nut a good fit and it goes right across the bottom of the post.

I did get another piece of steel to make another support block that goes over the post and is secured in the next "T" slot, the idea being that it would effectively increase the footprint and add support. Unfortunately I have not got round to making it yet. Other projects have got in the way.

I recall Martin Cleeve suffered a tee slot breakage whilst parting off on his ML7; characteristically, he proceeded to replace his cross slide with one fabricated from steel.

Myfords apparently thought that their own RTP could be held by a single slot but I prefer the Duplex/GHT use of two.

Good point by old mart about the need to control saddle lift.

Roger Woollett02/02/2020 11:53:27
120 forum posts
4 photos

I agree with Jason the toolpost is "old school" and designed for quarter inch tooling.

p1000924.jpg

Dell02/02/2020 12:41:52
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49 forum posts
13 photos

The overhang was just to set the height to centre and yes I can use a 1/4” HSS parting tool but some of the things I intend to make are 45mm diameter in brass so an HSS parting tool is not going to cut it ( pun intended ), if I make a wedge to set the tool on a rake would that not work ?.

Dell

JasonB02/02/2020 13:07:20
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Moderator
20283 forum posts
2218 photos
1 articles

If you are careful to make sure the cutter does not get tilted sideways it is possible to just mount the HSS bit that you show in the toolpost without the holder, might just mean you can't get quite as close to the chuck jaws but only by 1mm or so.

There are also other designs of holder that would allow you to use the same type of tapered section tool but mounted higher up.

The problem with tilting the holder is you will get more negative top rake, may get away with it on brass but not dood for anything else. Also if you want to move the blase in and out it mucks up the ctr height, those 1.5mm blades can easily flex sideways so for your 45mm dia cut you would want to start with say 10mm protruding then extend another 10mm and finally a bit more to reach right in to the ctr.

Dell02/02/2020 14:18:11
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49 forum posts
13 photos

Thanks JasonB

being new to using a lathe especially one this small it is and will be a steep learning curve, I knew I would have to cut a bit then extend the bit cut then extend again , also I have been looking to see if I could find a different sort of tool so if you have a picture or link that would be great .

i haven’t started yet as I want to make everything clear in my thick head before I get going.

Many thanks Dell

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