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My First Stationary Engine

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Ron Laden10/02/2020 17:06:50
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Thanks Geoff/Jason and thanks for your help, much appreciated.

I am really chuffed with it I imagined a lot of fiddling and adjusting so it was a surprise when I turned on the air, gave it a flick and off it went..smiley

I would like to build in some counter balance to the steel flywheel if possible but how do you calculate how much or is there an element of guesstimation..?

A video below with some sound, excuse the sound of someone taking their last breaths its the airbrush compressor which is an on demand type. Although it provides a constant air pressure it switches itself on and off constantly.

 

Edited By Ron Laden on 10/02/2020 17:07:51

Ron Laden11/02/2020 06:07:41
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Jason you mentioned a second engine well I think there will be.

The class 22 body I am going to build in the old workshop but not until the weather picks up so at least a month I guess. I could do more on the T/E but I really want the 22 finished first then concentrate on the traction.

So I am looking for a project any suggestions would be welcome.

I am thinking something a bit more advanced than the little oscillator but not too complex or long winded. Made from bar stock with the exception of the flywheel of course. Maybe a bit larger, would even consider scaling something up and obviously something that will fit the lathe and the little mill.

Ron

Edited By Ron Laden on 11/02/2020 06:11:19

Edited By Ron Laden on 11/02/2020 06:12:35

JasonB11/02/2020 06:57:41
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It is possible to weigh the various moving parts and work out what the balance weight should be but on something like this trial and hopefully not too much error will do. If you are making the flywheel as per drawing then I would think about leaving one of the holes smaller and then testing the engine gradually opening it up until you get the balance. This may not suit the eye so the other option would be to add some weight to the rim much like you do a car wheel and then blend it in with filler and paint over the top.

I should think you could manage my Jowitt described on here or even the Muncaster, or there are Stew Harts "Potty" series of engines.

Daniel11/02/2020 08:43:06
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A superb and inspirational thread Ron.

Well done, yes

ATB,

Daniel

geoff walker 111/02/2020 09:02:28
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HI Ron and well done'

With regard to balancing the engine.

The flywheel needs to be as balanced as possible but without a balanced crank as well I can't see how you will ever have a good static balance and without that never have a good dynamic balance.

To aid balance the crank is better with a crank web such that when you rotate the engine by hand it will NOT settle in the same place every time. The web can be adjusted for size by making it larger or smaller or adding weights to the web

Three of the simpler muncaster engines have no balanced crank.?

Just my thoughts Geoff

Ron Laden11/02/2020 09:31:31
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Thanks Daniel, I surprised myself how well it has gone, especially the running, still got the flywheel and plinth to make to finish the engine.

Geoff, thinking about the balance I dont think I will worry too much about it, I will get a bit of weight into the plinth and I wont be running the engine flat out. I think it better run at just below mid speed or slower and the engine is quite stable at those speeds even on the temporary lightweight plinth.

Ron

Ron Laden11/02/2020 10:38:55
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Jason,

Once I have the oscillator finished I am going to have a go at the Jowitt engine, I really like the look of it especially the cylinder.

I have been through your build thread and the drawings and I am happy with it and I think I have most of the tooling thats needed.

I happen to have some 2 inch x 1/2 inch 6082 for the side frames so thats a start. I am thinking aluminium for the cylinder which I think you said is an option and the faceted cuts method went well on the T/E cylinder so I should be ok with the shaping.

Looking forward to making a start.

Ron

 

Edited By Ron Laden on 11/02/2020 10:40:38

JasonB11/02/2020 12:58:20
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Yes aluminium will be OK. There is also the option to make it smaller, I did one at half size and 3/4 size would be about what the original was.

Most if not all of the hit and miss engines that I have made don't have any form of balance to the crank and even my 2" Fowler does not all as per full size but they do have balance weight or hollowed out parts to the flywheel to provide the counter balance.

Edited By JasonB on 11/02/2020 13:02:07

Ron Laden11/02/2020 17:09:56
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1985 forum posts
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Thanks Jason,

I think I will go with the size as per your drawings and build thread.

Watching the video it does look a very good runner and the sound is nice to, I checked on Reeves website and the Perseus flywheels still seem to be available.

Ron

Ron Laden12/02/2020 06:33:56
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1985 forum posts
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Change of plan for the flywheel I am not going with machining up a steel version I think the engine deserves better than that. I have ordered a 3 inch x 1/2 inch 6 spoke cast iron wheel from Stuart, will look much better I think. Also I am not much of a fan of engines mounted on a wooden base but that's just me. I know numerous engines have been presented like that over the years and it was probably the excepted method but I much prefer to see a nicely shaped/finished metal plinth/base. I will probably get shot down in flames now.. indecisionbut its just my preference.

Ron

Edited By Ron Laden on 12/02/2020 06:38:15

Pero12/02/2020 07:27:46
114 forum posts

There is no right or wrong.

I like wood ... and metal. It's a matter of personal preference and what the builder thinks suits the particular model best.

A well finished base adds an enormous amount to the presentation of a model engine.

Pero

JasonB12/02/2020 07:42:39
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I was thinking about the question of balance and having just watched the video again that has confirmed what I was thinking. The movement is not so much caused by the piston going up and down but by the cylinder moving from side to side, you can see the base of the engine moving in one plane when it speeds up about half way through the video.

More weight in the bottom would help such as changing the aluminium base to steel or iron and then punch out a couple of thin rubber discs and glue to the underside so it is less likely to slide about and also saves marking the shelf/table/display case.

Good call on the cast flywheel

Ron Laden12/02/2020 08:13:36
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Thanks Jason,

Yes watching the video I see what you mean, I am thinking of a 100mm base probably round in shape and a reasonable thickness to elevate the engine so steel I guess should be heavy enough.

I am hoping the Stuart flywheel is like their website picture, it looks a very clean casting but we will see.

Out of interest I made a materials list from the drawings for when I start the Jowitt and its not too bad, I have most it. Need some bronze, the flywheels, O rings and a lump of alu for the cylinder and I should be about there.

JasonB12/02/2020 12:52:38
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I've used the Stuart 10 series flywheels for a few engines and they have all been quite good castings.

Former Member12/02/2020 15:24:29
1329 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

Ron Laden12/02/2020 17:11:56
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1985 forum posts
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Posted by Bill Chugg on 12/02/2020 15:24:29:

You should be pleased with it Ron.

In the clearout of all my models, I recently passed on an original Chelston Model Engineering version, and it went really well. Made from a kit of parts by someone other than myself.

Bill

Edited By Bill Chugg on 12/02/2020 15:25:51

Hi Bill, yes I am pleased with it, turned out better than I expected, will be good to see a nice flywheel on it.

Ron

geoff walker 112/02/2020 17:34:42
418 forum posts
160 photos

Hi Ron,

Yes 10/10 for the flywheel, stuart castings are ex quality, machine beautifully and will look great on your model!!!

Nice work, looking forward to final pics and video.

Geoff

geoff walker 112/02/2020 17:47:26
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Hi Jason

Most if not all of the hit and miss engines that I have made don't have any form of balance to the crank and even my 2" Fowler does not all as per full size but they do have balance weight or hollowed out parts to the flywheel to provide the counter balance.

The above paragraph, interesting, what I would describe as lateral thinking.

Are you saying that if one component is out of balance, the crank, you also make the flywheel out of balance to counteract? Would the weights/hollows on the flywheel be at roughly 180 degrees to the crank pin and big end.

I can see the logic and how it would work, but like I say lateral thinking and very interesting.

Geoff

JasonB12/02/2020 18:57:02
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That's it. The hollow is on the crank pin side of teh flywheel and the weight on the opposite side, couple of examples

Ron Laden12/02/2020 20:01:45
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1985 forum posts
393 photos

This afternoon whilst going through a box of freebie offcuts which I was given some time ago and forgotten about I found a couple of offcuts marked up as Manganese Bronze.

I faced one piece and it machines nicely but is it a good bearing material like PB and are there any down sides to using it.

Edited By Ron Laden on 12/02/2020 20:03:00

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