By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Help choosing my lathe

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
JasonB23/01/2020 07:34:25
avatar
Moderator
17035 forum posts
1826 photos
1 articles
Posted by not done it yet on 23/01/2020 05:54:14: Most sheet material is now 2400 x 1200mm - steadily changing from 2420 x 1210mm. Builders build at 400mm centres for roofing, etc, not 16” as they used to do.

If only that were the case, plasterboard comes 1200 x 2400 and fits the 400mm spacing nicely but ply, osb, MDF, MFC comes in 1220 x 2440. or other multiples based on imperial

It has never come in 1210 x 2420 but did used to come in 8 x 4 sheets which work out ate 1220 x 2440.

Michael Gilligan23/01/2020 08:48:15
avatar
14761 forum posts
635 photos
Posted by Gerard O'Toole on 23/01/2020 06:50:09:
Posted by not done it yet on 23/01/2020 05:54:14:

 

I have never made a 15mm/1/2” copper coupling with a “special’ connector, but I do know that 1/2” is 12.7mm, not 15😉. They are close enough, for a solder joint, to be compatible.

 

I believe the 15mm pipe is 15mm outside diameter. The 1/2" pipe (1/2" inside diameter ) is 14.7mm outside diameter. So even less difference

 

yes

... and you need a slightly stepped coupling to make a good capilliary-soldered joint.

[ perhaps they don’t use Yorkshire fittings in Lincolnshire ]

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 23/01/2020 08:49:12

not done it yet23/01/2020 08:50:43
3916 forum posts
15 photos

Oops, sorry, yes 1220 x 2440. Such a long time since I bought any of that imperial/metric fudge! I’m neither a builder nor a plumber. But the principle is the same - they are progressively going metric.

Michael Gilligan23/01/2020 09:13:31
avatar
14761 forum posts
635 photos

Sorry to drag this even further away from the subject of lathes, but:

It will be a while before the electronics industry completely abandons 0.1” [2.54mm] spacing on boards and components.

MichaelG.

Hollowpoint23/01/2020 09:28:37
277 forum posts
30 photos

Im a metric man (33). Im not great at imperial measurements but I get by. My lathe (boxford) is imperial but its never bothered me. When I turn a part I tend to creep up on the dimension and keep checking with a caliper anyway. I also have the 127 tooth gear for cutting metric threads.

Michael Gilligan23/01/2020 09:35:42
avatar
14761 forum posts
635 photos
Posted by Hollowpoint on 23/01/2020 09:28:37:

Im a metric man (33).

.

So, I guess you will be more comfortable when you are 50

[ sorry, I couldn’t resist that ]

MichaelG.

Mick B123/01/2020 10:21:46
1350 forum posts
75 photos

Go for whichever you like. I bought metric with my WM250V and many ME drawings, as well as parts for the heritage railway where I sometimes do volunteer machining, are mostly Imperial. It keeps the brain turning over to convert when necessary, and I've found for a long time that I can work reasonably fluently in either or both.

One of the gotchas in the WM250V is engaging feed at the end of travel or with the slide locked - it'll bend the saddle drive pinion shank before the shearpin snaps. You can straighten it with a crowbar, but it took me a year of tight spots to discover that.

laugh

Andrew Johnston23/01/2020 10:22:09
avatar
5106 forum posts
594 photos

It would be worth checking what imperial and metric threads can actually be cut; the range isn't always comprehensive. It would also be useful to know if the leadscrews and screwcutting gearbox are different. It's not unknown for leadscrews to be the same between imperial and metric, just the dials are changed. It also depends upon which threads are most like to be screwcut. As I'm sure you know, on an industrial lathe it is easiest to cut imperial threads on an imperial machine, and metric threads on a metric machine, but not vice versa. I don't know what the situation would be on the Warco.

Andrew

Michael Gilligan23/01/2020 10:41:15
avatar
14761 forum posts
635 photos
Posted by Mick B1 on 23/01/2020 10:21:46:

[…]

I've found for a long time that I can work reasonably fluently in either or both.

.

I often work/think in mixed units ... it seems quite intuitive to express something as “ten millimetres, plus or minus a couple of thou” [where thou is a thousandth of an inch]

This may be because they are both comfortable ‘human’ numbers

... the micron is rather small for general engineering use, and we don’t have linguistically convenient names for tenths and hundredths of a millimetre.

MichaelG.

ega23/01/2020 10:52:59
1435 forum posts
115 photos

I understand that metric people just say "hundredths". Perhaps there is less possibility for confusion here: how many imperial types refer to hundredths of an inch?

Michael Gilligan23/01/2020 11:12:04
avatar
14761 forum posts
635 photos
Posted by ega on 23/01/2020 10:52:59:

I understand that metric people just say "hundredths". Perhaps there is less possibility for confusion here: how many imperial types refer to hundredths of an inch?

.

I accept your point ... although I don’t personally find the word “hundredths” linguistically convenient.

MichaelG.

Mick B123/01/2020 15:30:11
1350 forum posts
75 photos
Posted by Philip Powell on 22/01/2020 20:58:58:

Mick. Have you considered if the leadscrew is different in metric or imperial machines? You might find one has a more useful range of thread pitches or tpi than the other.

...

Phil.

Just to point out: I had to do a 19 TPI thread a year or so ago, and apart from my Metric WM250V, I didn't find any other lathe in the shop that could do it.

surprise

ega23/01/2020 16:45:23
1435 forum posts
115 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 23/01/2020 11:12:04:
Posted by ega on 23/01/2020 10:52:59:

I understand that metric people just say "hundredths". Perhaps there is less possibility for confusion here: how many imperial types refer to hundredths of an inch?

.

I accept your point ... although I don’t personally find the word “hundredths” linguistically convenient.

MichaelG.

I'm with you on the language point. The source of my observation was an article by one of our imperial luminaries in which he told how initially upset he was to be told that his work was "a few hundredths out".

Incidentally, although I am averse to political correctness I prefer "English" to "Imperial" even though it is inaccurate today.

Howard Lewis23/01/2020 22:33:25
2715 forum posts
2 photos

If you buy an old enough machine, you won't have this problem. There won't be any graduated dials, just handles!

My Mill/Drill is Imperial.

My lathe is Metric, but dual dialled. Mostly I work in Imperial, and most of my measuring equipment is Imperial.

A digital calliper, or a DRO, allows working in either.

At CAV we worked almost exclusively in Metric, although the product, being American design, was physically Imperial!

The current project involves a mixture of Imperial and a few Metric dimensions, because i choose to work in Imperial, most of the time.

But I keep a calculator on the shelf. No great problem, working in either.

If you choose to work Metric, use the calculator for any old drawings in Imperial.

You are measuring a distance, only the units differ.

Water boils at 100'Centigrade, at 212'Fahrenheit or 80' Reamur; just depends what units you use to measure it

In photography, speeds ratings were the same for films, there were three speed ratings, depending whether you were European, (Scheiner ), American (ASA ) or Russian (Gost ), and that ignored the pre WW2 Hurter and Driffield ratings and original Weston!

Remember the Amateur radio motto. KISS, and don't make needless complications!

Howard

Swarfy24/01/2020 07:13:10
12 forum posts

Is that lucas cav ? We manufactured parts for you where i used to work many years ago

Swarfy24/01/2020 18:04:32
12 forum posts

Thanks everybody all I need to do now is decide which (metric I’m sure )and order my 250V anyone got any discount codes for warco ?

jimmy b25/01/2020 08:59:17
avatar
568 forum posts
37 photos

Funnily enough I have had a discount code from Warco this mornin,via email, its SAVEJAN

Good luck, I think it's this weekend only.

Jim

Bill Chugg25/01/2020 09:14:02
966 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by jimmy b on 25/01/2020 08:59:17:

Funnily enough I have had a discount code from Warco this mornin,via email, its SAVEJAN

Good luck, I think it's this weekend only.

Jim

So did I. Put my order in -- OUT OF STOCK , and no facility to back order.

Bill

jimmy b25/01/2020 10:16:37
avatar
568 forum posts
37 photos

Bad luck Bill!

I usually get a discount code AFTER a big spend........

Jim

Howard Lewis25/01/2020 14:34:47
2715 forum posts
2 photos

Hi Swarfy

Yes, Lucas C A V , working at Acton, in the Diesel Lab. Left in 1969, to go into buses. FAR less hassle than trying to satisfy the Staff manager as well as your immediate technical superiors.

Howard.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Eccentric July 5 2018
ChesterUK
cowells
Warco
emcomachinetools
Ausee.com.au
Allendale Electronics
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest