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What Did You Do Today 2020

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Nigel Graham 223/06/2020 15:39:59
720 forum posts
16 photos

Thank you Bazyle!

Not difficult when it's the only entrant.

I'll have to make a rally plaque with my own town name.

Ian Skeldon 223/06/2020 21:52:49
487 forum posts
37 photos

img_20200623_173452.jpgimg_20200623_173411.jpgToday saw the start of a strip down and service of my Myford Mill. Table off to check the lead screw, turns out that it's not too bad at all, a quick tweak of the adjustment screw on the half nut block saw the backlash greatly reduced. The gib seems to be in good condition as well. I have taken out the oil cups in the table to be replaced with new ones, the ways will be cleaned up and checked and the table checked for any little issues before I strip anything further.

img_20200623_173400.jpg

Nigel Graham 223/06/2020 23:54:10
720 forum posts
16 photos

Ian -

Thank you for showing us progress.

I am following it with particular interest as I own a Myford VM-C too and you might be able to help with a couple of small snags.

The first is that the leadscrew appears to miss a beat now and again. It's an odd effect, as if somehow the leadscrew occasionally saves all its backlash up and releases it in one go, in mid-wind in one direction. Any clues?

The second is one that came with the machine but fell down the priority list, and that is a very stiff quill, making sensitive drilling difficult. The stiffness is enough to prevent the quill springing back up. The problem may be as simple as congealed grease on the rack and pinion, but Myford did not make it particularly accessible. I am also very reluctant to interfere with the wound-up spring. I do not have the tools or knowledge for handling clock-type springs and past experience dictates leaving it well alone in its little housing, still clinging to the shaft! Would I right thinking the rack and pinion are accessible but only by removing the entire unit from the head of the machine?

+++

Today's work was a little bit of design-measuring and photographing on the steam-wagon then commencing a new motor-shield for the Myford lathe, after a spiral of swarf wiggled past what I had been using , entered the motor and damaged the inverter.

The repaired inverter and tested motor came home today from Newton-Tesla to whom thank-you for efficient service, but fitting will wait until the new guard is ready. I am fabricating this from 3mm thick, stiff PVC sheet. I would have used steel (ex-central heating boiler panels courtesy of a friend in the building trade) but a certain germ has rendered access to the necessary guillotine and folder inaccessible for the duration!

'

Have had to leave the shed door open, with a barrier to keep out inquisitive frogs, as a young starling has hidden itself away on a shelf stacked with stuff, and I can only hope the early-morning daylight and my absence will make it find its way out. I have no idea what had frightened it but it had come hurtling through the door at floor level ,in a blind panic, and up to the furthest and highest corner. It didn't seem too frightened of me, but perhaps I don't look like a cat or bird of prey or whatever it was that had probably chased it. After trying to escape through a translucent, not transparent, window it has now lodged itself in another inaccessible spot. Luckily my back garden is quite secure.

Nicholas Farr24/06/2020 19:27:29
avatar
2406 forum posts
1188 photos

Hi, although not strictly ME, some components were made using my mini lathe, sensitive drilling machine and a few other hobby tools. Just for interest to music listing people, today I completed fitting my upgrade Crossovers to my Horn Cams,

horn cab 1.jpg

I sounded out both horn cabs and the LF cabs with Tina Turner's song "Better Be Good To Me" which is one of hers with some fantastic guitar music in it, which really tested the horns and they performed very well indeed, pumped the sound up till it was nearly rattling the windows and no significant distortion was detected.

A few pictures of the chokes that I made Crossover Coils for those who are interested.

Regards Nick.

Ian Skeldon 224/06/2020 20:26:12
487 forum posts
37 photos
Posted by Nigel Graham 2 on 23/06/2020 23:54:10:

Ian -

Thank you for showing us progress.

I am following it with particular interest as I own a Myford VM-C too and you might be able to help with a couple of small snags.

The first is that the leadscrew appears to miss a beat now and again. It's an odd effect, as if somehow the leadscrew occasionally saves all its backlash up and releases it in one go, in mid-wind in one direction. Any clues?

The second is one that came with the machine but fell down the priority list, and that is a very stiff quill, making sensitive drilling difficult. The stiffness is enough to prevent the quill springing back up. The problem may be as simple as congealed grease on the rack and pinion, but Myford did not make it particularly accessible. I am also very reluctant to interfere with the wound-up spring. I do not have the tools or knowledge for handling clock-type springs and past experience dictates leaving it well alone in its little housing, still clinging to the shaft! Would I right thinking the rack and pinion are accessible but only by removing the entire unit from the head of the machine?

+++

Hi Nigel,

Firstly I have to tell you that I am not an expert with any piece of machinery, I just knew that although mine is in good nick it was about time to check everything over and adjust or replace as required.

I would think there could be a number of reasons for the table jumping first thing to check is that the gib is correctly adjusted and the table ways are lubricated. From your description it could be a broken or missing section of thread on the lead screw. It could be a particular area of wear that gives out when the load on the thread and half nut is sufficient or it could be an accumulation of wear in the screw and half nuts. Have you tried adjusting the half nuts to see if that helps? If adjusting the half nuts does not fix the problem then it would be best to take the table off and check everything out.

The quill being stiff could just be down to lack of lubrication or miss alignment with the bearings. Maybe it has been stripped and put back incorrectly before you bought it. I would undue but not remove the inspection cover screws, check that there is nothing pushing against the cover before removing it, if it is free moving slip it off and take a peek.

Hope that helps.

Ian

Edited By Ian Skeldon 2 on 24/06/2020 20:30:09

DrDave24/06/2020 21:36:35
204 forum posts
44 photos

Bit of a mixed bag today. I thought that I was making good progress milling the excess off a block of aluminium for a new engine. Heisenberg, my SX2 mill, was sounding unhappy, so I put a brand new end mill in and tried again. Even worse. I got hold of the bed & gave it a wiggle: there is about 1 mm play on the Y-axis.

I wound the bed all the way out to see if I could tighten the anti-backlash nut only to find that the problem is that the nut has come loose from the bed. Ah, well, time to give it some of the TLC that it needs, and check to see what else has come loose.

Mark Rand24/06/2020 22:50:00
918 forum posts
6 photos

SWMBO has ordered me to make a new garden gate after its predecessor lasted less than 25 years.

I'm ashamed to say that I spent some of today cutting tennons in allegedly 150x47mm C24 timber on the milling machine. Mortices will be cut when the 16mm long series cutter arrives from Ketan at Arc Eurotrate...

Nigel Graham 225/06/2020 00:12:30
720 forum posts
16 photos

Ian Skeldon -

Thank you for the suggestions.

I think a broken lead-screw thread would make its presence felt a lot more markedly, but anyway I did not notice any broken areas when I rebuilt the machine I'd had to dismantle in order to move home and rebuild it in its new workshop.

Uneven wear though does sound very likely, and it's noticeable the gib clamping-screws are very sensitive in certain areas of travel.

I'll see if I can adjust the lead-screw nut.

'

I noticed the cap covering the quill pinion shaft bearing had worked loose, and needed re-tightening. I am not sure how that could have happened - vibration I think.

Looking in the manual I see there is a large opening behind the spindle but you need remove the whole unit from the head to reach it, or even see it. Since I intend to replace the motor with a 3-phase conversion - and possibly either overhaul or remove the intermediate belt pulley - it would be best to attend to both at the same time.

(Machine servicing is one reason I am building an overhead travelling-crane for the workshop, but looking at the clearance I think the hoist would have to be some form of pull-up jack rather than block-and-tackle for working on the higher parts of the mill.)

'

Elsewhere Today...

I refitted the 3ph motor and inverter to the Myford lathe, and completed a fabricated shield for it. Made from two pieces of 3mm PVC sheet in mid-grey, it looks somewhere near the part! I've set its end face fractionally behind the faceplate surface, but I needed make a pan in that face for better clearance round the motor's mounting-clamps and ventilation holes.

After pondering on how, I came up with pressing it.....

.... With some lateral thinking on what to use as punch and die...

The two main parts of the cylindrical base of the lifting-equipment for the steam-wagon boiler are a plywood ring and disc with a generous clearance annulus. This is necessitated by the firebox being a vertical cylinder whose inner protrudes below the foundation-ring, so the base effectively supports the end of a tube.)

They proved ideal as thermo-forming punch and die!

Set up on the bench-drill with a bit of M12 studding as ram, topped by an aluminium-foil pie-dish to deflect heat from the machine, the operation took no more than about 8 or 10 iterations with a hot-air gun to soften the plastic enough to deform. I held the quill down each time to let the plastic cool and harden, so I could examine progress and adjust where necessary. A further heating and a steel plate under the "punch" removed some distortion from the surrounding material to finish.

The result - a flat-topped dimple 4 - 5 inches diameter X about 1/4-inch high that even looks right .

I've made one or two small, single items by hot-bending PVC sheet but this was the most advanced I have done, and useful experience. For example, I realised afterwards I should have masked the surface next to the joint so the over-brushed or extruded solvent - standard plumbing adhesive - did not etch it.

Nick Clarke 325/06/2020 09:25:13
avatar
855 forum posts
28 photos
Posted by DrDave on 24/06/2020 21:36:35:

Heisenberg, my SX2 mill, was sounding unhappy, so I put a brand new end mill in and tried again.

Heisenberg?? Hopefully not because it is uncertain? laugh

Cornish Jack26/06/2020 10:12:13
1162 forum posts
163 photos

Definitely not today, but over much too long a period, finally fitted a 2 axis DRO to my D-W mill. Thanks are due to all the members who provided hints, tips and suggestions plus the customer support at Allendale for sorting the digital bit! I'm posting a couple of pics which, if you can ignore the crap workmanship, may be useful for other D-W owners. The last pic is of the repair to the motor/head support tbe which was broken and which several members offered suggestions for repair. For logistical (proximity) reasons, I tool Pgk's advice and went agri-engineer. The repair has been deliberately left 'as-is' on mutual agreement that it would probably be stronger and the 'looks' suit my 'style'!!blush

Thanks to all who helped.

rgds

Bill

img_0117a.jpg

img_0119a.jpg

img_0124a.jpg

img_0127a.jpg

img_0125b.jpg

DrDave26/06/2020 11:56:14
204 forum posts
44 photos
Posted by Nick Clarke 3 on 25/06/2020 09:25:13:
Posted by DrDave on 24/06/2020 21:36:35:

Heisenberg, my SX2 mill, was sounding unhappy, so I put a brand new end mill in and tried again.

Heisenberg?? Hopefully not because it is uncertain? laugh

You got it in one!

I never know quite how much is going to come off until afterwards...

DrDave26/06/2020 11:56:18
204 forum posts
44 photos

Removed duplicate posting

Edited By DrDave on 26/06/2020 11:57:08

Nigel Graham 228/06/2020 22:40:08
720 forum posts
16 photos

Finished and fitted the new motor-guard / splash-back for the ML7.

It's all fabricated from 3mm PVC sheet, glued with plumbing solvent-adhesive then the joints reinforced with hot-melt glue.

The panels are joined using "angle-plastic". All the bending was after softening the PVC with a heat-gun, then for the angles, pressing them manually between two lengths of angle-steel. The steel soon cooled the hot plastic, so my fingers on the opposite sides of the conductive metal informed me.

The former for the curve along the box, was the steam-wagon's rolled steel "stovepipe" chimney laid along the 'Workmate'. (Don't worry, it wasn't harmed!)

The rear of the box portion and its far end are fully-open for ventilation, and it is slightly shorter than the motor. The main panel has a big rectangle cut out from its end to match the exterior of the box.

The up-stand angle at the far end of the box is to impart a little extra rigidity and restrain any stray debris that gets up there. The "roof" is not temptingly accessible to use as a tool-tray!

Took a couple of photos of the assembly, then fitted it.

The box is held to the countershaft frame by 3 M6 screws through a shallow PVC channel bridging the frame's central hole, and tapped into an area with a doubler-strip glued behind it. The main panel is held to the Sterling-board workshop lining by 3 wood-screws, via simple wooden block spacers, along its top edge. All the holes are visible in the picture.

I made the circular raised portion that clears the motor mounting and stiffens the face also by hot-pressing, using a plywood disc " punch" and plywood "die" - actually borrowed parts of the lifting-cradle for my steam-wagon's boiler.

A different line of work from metal, and an interesting if sometimes awkward and frustrating process.

ml7 splash-back - june 2020 a.jpg

Mark Rand29/06/2020 23:08:32
918 forum posts
6 photos

Low precision machining and fitting of non-isotropic material has proceeded nicely in the shed. Tomorrow I hope to weld it together,,,

frame.jpg

Paul Janes29/06/2020 23:33:36
16 forum posts
2 photos

Bill,

One of the photos about your DRO installation has a small crane for lifting jobs onto the mill. Can you please post some details about it. (About a month or so ago there was some posts about lifting devices in the workshop)

Paul

Cornish Jack30/06/2020 00:17:29
1162 forum posts
163 photos

Hi Paul - thanks for the query. The 'crane' started life as a mobility scooter or wheelchair car lift. Capacity about 160 kgs? I bought the basic, non-working motor, base and jib. It's mounted on a 6 mm steel rectangular tube welded to a 170mm, 6mm thick sqare base plate. I 'fixed' the motor and wired in a vari-speed RS transformer to give the 12volt power. The jib is about 50mm long, slightly extendable and swings through 270 degrees. I use g-clamps to secure it so that I can use it on other caster-based benches. I'll take a few more piccies and put them up here.

Let me know if any further needed.

rgds

Bill

Michael Gilligan30/06/2020 08:57:31
avatar
16202 forum posts
706 photos

Courtesy of the News feed, I stumbled across TROVE this morning:

As a spot-check, I searched for ‘Synchronome’ ... and yes, this does appear to be a pretty comprehensive resource: **LINK**

https://trove.nla.gov.au/search?keyword=synchronome

Thank you, Australia yes

MichaelG.

Cornish Jack30/06/2020 09:34:37
1162 forum posts
163 photos

Too late now to edit my post re. the 'crane' but, as no doubt realised, the quoted jib length of 50mm should have been 50 cm!! ... (Bloody new-fangled meaurements! What was wrong with the groat and bushel?)

rgds

Bill

Edited By Cornish Jack on 30/06/2020 09:35:12

Anthony Knights30/06/2020 10:31:24
419 forum posts
180 photos

Yesterday the guard on my bench pillar drill finally disintergrated. I has been a PIA for sometime, constantly coming loose and to be honest, was more dangerous than not having one.guard_broke.jpg

It also supported a primitive depth gauge/stop. (those of you with a similar model drill will know what I mean). I decided not to re-instate this as the hole it was in makes a convenient chuck key storage point.

gauge.jpg

I decided that I would make a large graduated wheel to fit the operating spindle and finally finished and fitted it this morning. I do have some 2.5mm number punches, so the next job is to make a jig to accurately mark the dial. I will have to check how they perform on a curved surface first. It is perfectly useable as it is.

dial.jpg

edited for duff formatting.

Edited By Anthony Knights on 30/06/2020 10:33:41

Edited By Anthony Knights on 30/06/2020 10:35:56

Nicholas Farr30/06/2020 10:51:02
avatar
2406 forum posts
1188 photos

Hi Anthony, I've got the same model, but different "badge" don't use it much now, but looks as if you've gone the right way forward, very good.

Regards Nick.

Edited By Nicholas Farr on 30/06/2020 10:51:32

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