By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

What Did You Do Today 2020

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
thaiguzzi31/05/2020 05:31:38
avatar
696 forum posts
131 photos
Posted by John Pace on 25/05/2020 17:26:02:

Here is what i made to do the same job ,this balancing frame made from
pieces of old steel channel bolted together some slots milled in each side
for some hardened pieces of gauge plate.Fitted on the machine and
ground flat some pieces of aluminium at each end to stop the wheel rolling
off ,three jacking screws to level the frame .The edges should be ground to
knife edge but the balancing shaft is soft so i left them square.
Simple and little to go wrong just have to keep the edges clean.

John

wheel balancing.jpg

John Hinkley,

i had a specialist Triumph (Meriden - not Hinkley...) shop in the UK 1988-2003, and if the customer did'nt want to spring for a dynamic crank assembly balance (sent off), we offered in house static balancing. After making our own balance jigs of various copied designs inc your bearing version, and never being happy with the end result, we settled finally on John's version above. No bearings, just knife edges, used for many many years, highly accurate and repeatable.

My 2 Baht's worth,

regards,

TG.

John Hinkley31/05/2020 08:03:57
avatar
873 forum posts
291 photos

TG,

Thanks for that. It's pretty much confirmed the direction I'm going on this one. Tried the knife edge wheels described in my post with the CAD screenshot. That didn't work either, I'm going to try a pair of 6mmØ silver steel rods fixed to the top of the fixture and add three levelling screws for good measure. Failing that, I'm resigned to ordering some new material for the "scrap bin",

John

martin perman31/05/2020 08:37:11
avatar
1828 forum posts
78 photos
Posted by Nigel Graham 2 on 31/05/2020 00:51:26:

Un filter perdu, a boiler still not yet mounted, and lights confirmed...

'

A somewhat lazy day but I cleaned the inside of the car, a wheelchair-converted Renault Kangoo, and finally replaced its broken mirror - I've booked the MoT for Wednesday. (I'd struck the mirror on an overhanging hedge-branch, losing half the glass; but enough remained, held in with lots of duct tape, to be useable.)

I remembered an "advisory" from last year (year before?) about changing or cleaning the pollen filter I never knew it had. It's not called that in the Owner's handbook, which does include things my version does not have, but of course neither is its location given!

The Internet yielded only fair to poor videos of changing the filter on the new Renault Kangoo. Still, they gave a clue as to where it might be.

Thinking about it, the ventilation system could well be clogged because it emits far more noise than hot or cold air; and in some conditions demisting necessitates using a squeegee every few minutes. This though is a modern (ish) car, so Goodness only knows where they've hidden any of the system. As a neighbour put it, it would have been designed by people who came straight from university and had never serviced a car in their lives!

'

Nigel,

The usual trick is to access the filter either via the glove box, will need removing, or under the bonnet, passenger side, you may need to remove the valance bonnet seal to remove the valance, it maybe in their.

Martin P.

Iain Downs31/05/2020 09:12:46
649 forum posts
570 photos

Curiously, Steve, I was walking round Lindley Wood reservoir (or near to be more accurate, it was like the M1!) and noticed the lack of water. As you say, quite concerning.

Iain

JohnF31/05/2020 09:16:46
avatar
981 forum posts
142 photos

John Hinckley this is how i balanced the wheel for my Christen drill grinder an impromptu method but it worked well providing you make sure the thin parallels are level to mother earth. Regarding the finish -- have you checked the spindle bearings ? Had a similar problem and it was the bearing causing the problem

imgp3024.jpg

92ec760c-4766-468c-ade2-628a4aa0deff.jpeg

John Hinkley31/05/2020 09:23:44
avatar
873 forum posts
291 photos

JohnF

I haven't checked the spindle bearings as the machine is a brand new (well a few months old) one from Warco. It is, however, called a "simple surface grinder" Whether the "simple" bit applies to the grinder or the surface is unclear! Possibly the operator?

I have a couple of thin parallels - actually two halves of a cheap, redundant digital caliper as a result of reading a readers tip in MEW a couple of issues ago - so I might try those as well.

JohnH

John Pace31/05/2020 09:55:22
181 forum posts
171 photos

Posted by John Hinkley 31/05/2020 08:03:57

Thanks for that. It's pretty much confirmed the direction I'm going on this one. Tried the knife
edge wheels described in my post with the CAD screenshot. That didn't work
either, I'm going to try a pair of 6mmØ silver steel rods fixed to the top of the fixture
and add three levelling screws for good measure. Failing that, I'm resigned to
ordering some new material for the "scrap bin",


Hi John

I think for the roller type of balancing cradles to work effectively the rollers need to be
large ,if you look in the lathe's web site at the Jones and Shipman page the balancing
cradle shown has rollers nearly 6 inch in diameter ,it all starts to get a bit big for hobby use.

Some useful articles have appeared in MEW long in the past .
An article Keith Johnson in MEW 180, Balancing grinding wheels , although written for balancing
wheels for the Quorn grinder the balancing cradle that he has designed would be useful
for balancing wheels.Uses round bars for the cradle.

Also worth reading
An article written by Michel Christiaens in MEW 139 Grinding wheel selection ,safety and
dressing.

Very little ever seems to appear in Mew in connection with grinding in general and
grinding machines,i think it is a much neglected aspect of this hobby.

Having said that Alan Jackson's small surface grinding machine made from a Dore Westbury milling machine has made a refreshing change.

John

John Hinkley31/05/2020 10:11:10
avatar
873 forum posts
291 photos

John Pace,

Thanks for the further links. I'll have a look at those later. I had hoped that the device would be compact and bijou, so 6inch wheels don't really fit in with that philosophy.

I think we ought to wrap up this thread diversion now, otherwise the moderators will be on our backs. Thanks to all for your various inputs.

John

Joseph Noci 131/05/2020 11:37:07
671 forum posts
890 photos

Nice Mill you have there JohnF...

Joe

imgp3024.jpg

Buffer31/05/2020 20:24:01
155 forum posts
46 photos

Inspired by the excellent casting articles by Luker and Gerald Martyn today I cast the front smokebox ring for my Black5. And I'm still buzzin. Thanks guys.

20200531_152847.jpg

20200531_164741.jpg

Henry Brown31/05/2020 21:57:09
avatar
214 forum posts
68 photos

I dropped on a Newall boring and facing head recently, it came with a steel case that probably wasn't originally with it. It had some woodwook inside but it didn't fit very well so I've added more and re-awoke my inner feminine side to fit a nice green baize lining, I just need to remember how the head works now as I haven't used one since I was in my teens as an apprentice on the jig borers...

20.05.31 boring and facing head in case.jpg

JohnF31/05/2020 22:16:10
avatar
981 forum posts
142 photos
Posted by Henry Brown on 31/05/2020 21:57:09:

I dropped on a Newall boring and facing head recently, it came with a steel case that probably wasn't originally with it. It had some woodwook inside but it didn't fit very well so I've added more and re-awoke my inner feminine side to fit a nice green baize lining, I just need to remember how the head works now as I haven't used one since I was in my teens as an apprentice on the jig borers...

20.05.31 boring and facing head in case.jpg

Looks the same at the one I use on Newal 2436 jig borer they were made by OMT [Optical Measuring Tools] part of the Newal group. The one i used was unfortunately not the best tool in the shop, eventually went over to Wohlhaupta and Kaiser boring heads however we were looking for tenths not thous !

John

JohnF31/05/2020 22:20:05
avatar
981 forum posts
142 photos
Posted by Joseph Noci 1 on 31/05/2020 11:37:07:

Nice Mill you have there JohnF...

Joe

Thanks Joe I bought it new in 1984 always been very please with it and its a very versatile machine -- great for small parts but surprising what its capable of as well.

John

martin perman31/05/2020 22:56:08
avatar
1828 forum posts
78 photos

I have started to make a foot operated sprung latch to keep our back door open during this warm session, its now on hold as I dont have any M5 countersunk screws so onto my second project and I'm making an adjustable traverse axis stop with a half inch micrometer barrel for fine adjustment on my lathe but that also came to a stop as I dont have any M5 countersunks for that either, I will ring around tomorrow to see what I can get.

Martin P

Nigel Graham 201/06/2020 00:34:36
641 forum posts
12 photos

Martin Perman -

Re Renault "cabin Filter" (Renault's name for it).

Thank you very much for the tip. I spent some time today exploring further.

'

The glove-box on my version of the Kangoo cannot be removed. It is integral with the single plastic dashboard moulding which spans the full width of the car, is installed with hidden fastenings, and holds an air-bag, the heater vents and controls and all sorts of other equipment. Removing that would be a major operation for a properly-equipped, professional garage; not an owner's roadside maintenance task.

There is a removable panel in the end of the dashboard moulding, facing the passenger door, but it hides only cables. There is no equivalent in the off-side end.

What few parts of the heating system are visible by grovelling on the floor are not identifiable; and none match what the videos suggest is a sizeable rectangular box.

'

SO.... This filter is either not inside the car anyway; or is hidden and inaccessible.

'

Under the bonnet? (Apparently, the Megan's cabin filter is accessibly in the scuttle. Clearly a mistake.) No. Nowhere under the bonnet; at least certainly not obviously so. I would expect it to be close to the blower and heater - wherever they may be. They are totally hidden and totally inaccessible.

The only two readily-removable panels that might hide this blasted filter, cover only cable-looms.

The heater water-hoses are clearly visible between the engine and bulkhead. Virtually nothing of the heating & ventilating system is visible or accessible between there and its controls and outlets

I noticed even replacing the engine air-filter might take all day, assuming you can work out how!

'

Nothing useful on-line. Just poorly-made videos about different versions of the car, and web-sites demanding "accounts", expensive open-ended subscriptions, etc. I found a free pdf manual but it covers only the engines.

My car was built in 2006, and surprisingly it still has its original Owner's Handbook and official service book. The Handbook tells you to change the cabin filter annually, but not how to find it, nor which vehicle editions carry one. The few pages completed in the service log suggest this filter (if it exists) has never been changed. I am not surprised.

I now doubt the model I own has such a filter. So why is the demister so inefficient, and why did the last MoT document "advise" it needed changing? I had booked a service too, so why had the garage not changed it?

Just one possibility remains... that the filter does exist but as a separate unit, under the bonnet, hard to identify without pictures, and nowhere logical.

' ' '

Gave up, did some gardening and finished my steam-wagon's boiler mounting to the extent I could assemble everything so far. I can now determine how to make and fit the boiler's retaining-clips, improve the smokebox mountings and think about the grate, ashpan, cladding and plumbing.

Hopefully without "designing" inaccessibility traps beloved of the professional car manufacturer.

Grindstone Cowboy01/06/2020 02:18:36
300 forum posts
27 photos

These may be the videos you've already found, but...

Renault Kangoo ZE filter replacement here

Kangoo II here although this is a LHD model and the position looks to be the same as in the first video, so a lot easier on RHD.

Hope this might help.

Rob

martin perman01/06/2020 08:48:21
avatar
1828 forum posts
78 photos

Nigel this **LINK** is for a 2007 Kangoo, hope it helps.

Martin P

Edited By martin perman on 01/06/2020 08:49:36

Henry Brown01/06/2020 09:41:44
avatar
214 forum posts
68 photos
Posted by JohnF on 31/05/2020 22:16:10

Looks the same at the one I use on Newal 2436 jig borer they were made by OMT [Optical Measuring Tools] part of the Newal group. The one i used was unfortunately not the best tool in the shop, eventually went over to Wohlhaupta and Kaiser boring heads however we were looking for tenths not thous !

John

Hi John. Interesting, this one is made by CWC Lacey, Maidenhead, England. It seems in very good condition and now I have a 7/8 R8 sleeve for it I can give it a try. If I can't get on with it I can move it on as it didn't hurt the wallet!

As you say, may not be much good for tenths, and I certainly don't need that accuracy, but just having the facing facility will be handy.

Cheers, Henry.

Samsaranda01/06/2020 09:59:57
avatar
930 forum posts
5 photos

Nigel, I know just how frustrated you are with your pollen filter, I previously owned a Renault Modus, to change a headlight bulb you had to remove the whole front panel of the bodywork, labour charge by a Renault garage was in excess of £100. All I can say is French cars have always been “quirky”, moved on from Renault to Honda’s, so much more logical and so far with three Hondas nothing has required attention outside of the normal services.
Dave W

Nigel Graham 201/06/2020 10:05:26
641 forum posts
12 photos

Thank you Grindstone Cowboy.

Unfortunately, those videos still show quite different Kangoos, with far more removable panels, so better accessibility. It still seems difficult and complicated to reach a filter that is itself simple to service.

In mine the entire dashboard, glovebox, air-bag compartment, consoles etc. form a one-piece moulding you can't remove. Anything behind it, is inaccessible.

If the filter is under the bonnet, it is very well hidden or disguised. I vaguely recollect an anonymous, discreet box in a corner somewhere near the engine, about the right size and shape. I'll see if that might be it.

Otherwise either the car has no such filter or servicing it is possible only in a fully-equipped garage. Replacing the engine air filter casing doesn't look much easier.

I reckon modern car designers have a priority list: 1 style and luxury, 2 performance, 3 efficiency, ... (n) annual servicing to the specifications they set, last. Do these holders of 'ologies' in fashion, stress-analysis and SolidWorks, know which end of a spanner to hold?

'

I think of the tasks I performed years ago on three Bedford CA vans. Turning bushes for badly worn accelerator links. Replacing worn king-pin bushes on the wishbone suspension, using a second jack to compress the spring against the van's weight. (Yes, with substantial timbers under the raised vehicle!) Overhauling cylinder-heads. Replacing a three-speed gearbox, with a four speed box (rear-wheel drive). All at the roadside outside the house, as I have to work now. Though lengthy, dirty and sometimes heavy tasks, these were technically relatively easy and most parts were accessible. Then I tried replacing an air filter on a 2006 Renault Kangoo!

.

I recall an electronics designer recounting he once dragged the complacent detail-designers against their snooty will, to a customer's soggy, muddy work-site one dark wet Winter evening.

"Right!" he told me he said to them, "These are the conditions they have to use this equipment in; bad weather, poor light, cold hands, thick gloves.. I want it designed to suit them, not a show-laboratory!"

They did. The customer was delighted to find a supplier who actually thought of the users!

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Allendale Electronics
ChesterUK
emcomachinetools
Warco
cowells
Eccentric July 5 2018
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest