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MR16 LED Spot lights

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Peter Simpson 118/12/2019 21:59:00
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157 forum posts
8 photos

A few months ago I stripped the 415 Volt step down transformers out of a couple of MEM machine lights and converted to run off LED drivers and MR16 LED spot lights. They both work well and give a good overall illumination. The only problem is, the MR16 lamps eventually vibrate out of their holders as they are only secured by the two small pins, has anybody experienced this problem ? if so is there an easy fix.

Vic18/12/2019 22:10:26
2434 forum posts
12 photos

The downlighting in our kitchen have lock rings to prevent the bulbs falling out.

John Haine19/12/2019 06:32:59
2904 forum posts
149 photos

Use the GU50 type bulbs that have integral drivers and run from mains direct. The holders work a bit like a bayonet and the bulbs have to be twisted into position.

Speedy Builder519/12/2019 06:38:03
1936 forum posts
132 photos

These are larger, but I use 12 volt GU10s - with the bayonet, they in effect lock into place.

Robert Atkinson 219/12/2019 07:29:36
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555 forum posts
21 photos

Hi,
It is not good practice to use mains voltage bulbs or LEDs on machine tools. I'd suggest keeping the MR16's but adding a small blob of RTV silicone (bath caulk) between the body of the bulb and the socket. Vibration resistant but easy to remove if you have to change the bulb.

Robert G8RPI.

Peter Simpson 119/12/2019 08:01:08
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157 forum posts
8 photos

GU10 12volt lamps, where have you seen them ? Do they actually make them ?

Michael Gilligan19/12/2019 08:02:47
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15029 forum posts
645 photos
Posted by Robert Atkinson 2 on 19/12/2019 07:29:36:

Hi,
It is not good practice to use mains voltage bulbs or LEDs on machine tools. […]

.

I agree

A mechanical fix for a mechanical problem is appropriate ... don’t risk compromising electrical safety.

... but if you must go the GU10 route, please consider putting a safety isolating transformer in the circuit.

MichaelG.

.

Edit: Not all lamps are made this badlly, but:

http://kuzyatech.com/no-name-gu10-led-lamp-teardown

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 19/12/2019 08:09:37

Ron Laden19/12/2019 08:06:21
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1723 forum posts
315 photos

Just out of interest why is it not a good idea to use LEDs on machine tools..?

Michael Gilligan19/12/2019 08:11:53
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15029 forum posts
645 photos
Posted by Ron Laden on 19/12/2019 08:06:21:

Just out of interest why is it not a good idea to use LEDs on machine tools..?

.

dont know ... It’s a very good idea, Ron

The bad idea is using 220V/240V units

MichaelG.

.

Edit of Robert’s statement, for clarity:

It is not good practice to use mains voltage bulbs [or LED assemblies which run on mains voltage] on machine tools. […]

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 19/12/2019 08:23:26

Ron Laden19/12/2019 08:40:37
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1723 forum posts
315 photos

I missed the mains voltage part but I have to ask why is mains voltage LEDs or bulb types a problem.

Michael Gilligan19/12/2019 09:18:43
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15029 forum posts
645 photos

Quite simply, Ron ... Mains voltage hurts if you touch it.

One thing can lead to another, and nasty accidents occur with machine tools.

Many light units are not earthed [or reliably earthed], which increases the risk.

Industrial machines have long been required to use ‘safety low voltage’ in their lighting, and I consider it a wise precaution.

MichaelG.

DiogenesII19/12/2019 09:42:42
59 forum posts
6 photos

Just for the sake of "completeness" ..the MR16 also has a pair of opposing grooves on the "neck" above the pins which are provided for retention by a clip on some types of holders.. but like others have noted, it'll be easier to contrive a blob of something sticky..

Peter Simpson 119/12/2019 10:01:36
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157 forum posts
8 photos

It looks like it will have to be the "Blob of something sticky" method. Thanks and Merry Christmas to you all.

Speedy Builder519/12/2019 11:14:34
1936 forum posts
132 photos

Peter S - yep, I have them all over my garage which has no mains supply, just a battery and solar panel. Plenty on your favourite auction site or armazone !

BobH

RMA19/12/2019 11:46:52
233 forum posts
4 photos

Very timely thread as I'm considering changing the bulb in my original Centec lamp. The lamp itself is of a very sturdy metal construction as you'd expect from Centec, and I'd like to retain it.

Can the electrical experts on here point me in the direction of a reasonably priced low voltage conversion solution? Thanks in advance.

Ron Laden19/12/2019 12:57:35
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1723 forum posts
315 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 19/12/2019 09:18:43:

Quite simply, Ron ... Mains voltage hurts if you touch it.

One thing can lead to another, and nasty accidents occur with machine tools.

Many light units are not earthed [or reliably earthed], which increases the risk.

Industrial machines have long been required to use ‘safety low voltage’ in their lighting, and I consider it a wise precaution.

MichaelG.

I thought that the reason though I dont know I fully agree with it, at least not with a good installation, I can understand it though with H&S these days. Having said that my lighting is not attached to the machine in any way I prefer a good flood of lighting from above which lights all of the machine, my lights are fitted to the underside of a shelf which sits above the machine.

Keith Long19/12/2019 13:11:48
808 forum posts
10 photos

Ron consider the case where you have a 240 volt bulb on the lathe and you've got a chuck key in your hand - which slips, hits the bulb and breaks it, and you now wind up connected to the 240 volt feed into the bulb. I hope the earth trip operates fast enough.

If you've got good overall general lighting then you probably don't need the nearly ubiquitous "anglepoise" type light right on the lathe close to the chuck. If you do need the close-up light, for safety's sake make it a low voltage one.

Ron Laden19/12/2019 13:31:16
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1723 forum posts
315 photos

I take the point and agree Keith if I was using that type of close in lighting I would go for low voltage but as mentioned I prefer good overall lighting for all or most of the machine.

John Paton 119/12/2019 14:06:51
235 forum posts
6 photos

The other risk is cracking of cable insulation where the lamp arm articulates, combined with flying cutting fluid.

In theory the earth will cope with this but I would not entrust my life to earth continuity. With a dry floor and rubber soles shoes you might only get a belt but still best to avoid playing roulette when you are only part way through a project.

Peter Simpson 119/12/2019 14:09:42
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157 forum posts
8 photos

Speedy Builder5 You may have them all over your workshop...They are not GU10 LED's, as GU10 lamps are all 240 Volt.

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