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Rotary Table

What make is it?

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ChrisB09/12/2019 14:43:35
448 forum posts
175 photos

Hi, I have been after a 6" rotary table for quite a while, looking at ebay for a good deal on an HV6 or similar but all the time I was out bid.

Finally I managed to win an auction on a 6" rotary table and tailstock which were in a new never used condition. The table had some surface rust which went away with some scotchbrite, the tailstock was still in its plastic packaging and storage grease.

I disassembled the table and cleaned it from the grease and re-lubricated it. Looks fine to me.

The table has got no markings on it, no manufacture's data plate etc, and it's shape is not like any I have seen, such as a Vertex or Soba. It does not not even look like it's a casting - more like a machined block of steel (do not take my word for that)

My guess is it's a Chinese import - anyone knows what type of rotary table is this and if it's any good? I paid £200 for the table and tailstock, the price of a new HV6.

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Clive Brown 109/12/2019 14:53:29
307 forum posts
7 photos

Looks like those sold by ArcEuroTrade? A good buy.

Bill Davies 209/12/2019 15:28:18
139 forum posts
10 photos

Here is a 6 inch rotary table:

ArcEuroTrade rotary table

JasonB09/12/2019 15:43:20
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In case you missed it the 0-360deg ring around the edge of the table also moves and can be set to zero but is a good fit which is why it looks like you did not remove it.

As said above looks like the ones ARC sell which I think are made by Sieg or based on them.

I've been using one for a while and they ar ea nice table.

ChrisB09/12/2019 15:53:21
448 forum posts
175 photos
Posted by JasonB on 09/12/2019 15:43:20:

In case you missed it the 0-360deg ring around the edge of the table also moves and can be set to zero but is a good fit which is why it looks like you did not remove it.

Yes missed that Jason, don't have it's instructions manual. I will give it some penetrating oil and free it up. I thought it was some sort of Bison clone, but looking at the link above to the ARC website it looks identical - would never have thought it was that expensive!

Edited By ChrisB on 09/12/2019 15:53:54

Ron Laden09/12/2019 15:54:15
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1537 forum posts
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At £200 for the table and tailstock that is a very good buy, it certainly looks to be the ArcEuro one and I have only heard good things about it.

old mart09/12/2019 17:02:47
970 forum posts
104 photos

I notice that ARC sell the set of dividing plates to fit your table.

not done it yet09/12/2019 17:51:48
3774 forum posts
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Posted by old mart on 09/12/2019 17:02:47:

I notice that ARC sell the set of dividing plates to fit your table.

But do check that they would fit - before ordering. Not all dividing plates are the same and, sensibly, all above have said ‘it looks like...’.

ChrisB09/12/2019 18:24:54
448 forum posts
175 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 09/12/2019 17:51:48:
Posted by old mart on 09/12/2019 17:02:47:

I notice that ARC sell the set of dividing plates to fit your table.

But do check that they would fit - before ordering. Not all dividing plates are the same and, sensibly, all above have said ‘it looks like...’.

Yes, I'm missing the dividing plates. The one on the ARC site has a 1:72 gear ratio so if I count the teeth on the worm gear and it's 72, then the dividing plates should fit right?

Alternatively I could fit a stepper motor to it, would be a nice project!

JasonB09/12/2019 18:28:05
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You need to check the hole in the middle of the plate and the screw mounting holes, I'll measure mine tomorrow for you and dig out the instructions that list what divisions are possible.

Alan Vos09/12/2019 18:31:05
141 forum posts
7 photos
Posted by JasonB on 09/12/2019 15:43:20:

In case you missed it the 0-360deg ring around the edge of the table also moves and can be set to zero but is a good fit which is why it looks like you did not remove it.

I have the 4 inch version. That 0-360deg ring looks like it might move, but I have never managed to shift it. Is there a trick? Maybe the 4 inch does not have this.

not done it yet09/12/2019 18:40:02
3774 forum posts
15 photos

The one on the ARC site has a 1:72 gear ratio so if I count the teeth on the worm gear and it's 72, then the dividing plates should fit right?

I don’t think the number of turns per full revolution has much bearing on whether it will fit. 15 holes, or 47, holes just means that number of holes for a full revolution of the disc, nothing more. JB has the right dimensions to check. Any Indian or Chinese maker (or any other, for that matter) can choose the screw pitch circle and centre hole size.

JasonB09/12/2019 18:49:37
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Posted by Alan Vos on 09/12/2019 18:31:05:

I have the 4 inch version. That 0-360deg ring looks like it might move, but I have never managed to shift it. Is there a trick? Maybe the 4 inch does not have this.

loosen the small locking grub screw just to the side of "0" I found leaving the key in the screw made a good lever to turn the ring with. If you still have some of the very thick packing chicken fat on it that may need cleaning up first as it is rather sticky.

ChrisB09/12/2019 19:17:23
448 forum posts
175 photos

Jason, is the indexing dial ring on the handwheel stiff to turn on your table? It is quite stiff on mine, I took the handwheel apart and cleaned the ring and the small leaf spring, greased and assembled everything but it is still quite stiff. Must be the spring as without it the ring turns freely.

JasonB09/12/2019 19:24:34
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Probably a bit stiffer than the ones on the mills and definately more than the lathe ones which can be a bit too loose at times But at least there is no risk of it slipping or being turned by accident.

JasonB10/12/2019 19:23:43
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Sizes that you need to match if you are going to use an ARC dividing plate etc are.

approx 38mm spigot for plate to fit onto.

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approx 10mm shaft for handle to fit onto

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Approx 54mm over the two M5 fixings = 49mm ctrs

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Edited By JasonB on 10/12/2019 19:24:10

Alan Vos10/12/2019 21:23:49
141 forum posts
7 photos
Posted by JasonB on 09/12/2019 18:49:37:
Posted by Alan Vos on 09/12/2019 18:31:05:

I have the 4 inch version. That 0-360deg ring looks like it might move, but I have never managed to shift it. Is there a trick? Maybe the 4 inch does not have this.

loosen the small locking grub screw just to the side of "0" I found leaving the key in the screw made a good lever to turn the ring with. If you still have some of the very thick packing chicken fat on it that may need cleaning up first as it is rather sticky.

Thanks. I had not considered using the grub screw as a lever. I will persevere.

Howard Lewis10/12/2019 21:44:51
2588 forum posts
2 photos

Have you a chart giving the Turns and Holes for the various numbers of divisions with your Rotary Table?

If the gear ratio is 72:1, then the chart should call for one turn of the handle for each of 72 divisions.

If it is not 72:1, then whatever number of divisions that calls for one turn of the handle will be the gear ratio.

As an example; a Vertex HV6, calls for 1 turn for 90 divisions, so has a 90:1 ratio.

Otherwise, you will need to count how many turns of the handle are needed to rotate then table by a set number of degrees, such 90 degrees., and multiply by 4.

22.5 turns for a quarter turn means 90:1. 18 turns would mean 72:1, and so on. To be absolutely certain, keep counting the turns until the Zero graduation returns to the datum point. Bit of a PITA, but necessary to find the ratio. The higher the ratio the greater then resolution.

Mounting a set of division plates meant for a table with one ratio, onto one with a different ratio will mean that the chart supplied with the table will not apply, and a calculator or a spreadsheet will be needed, to arrive at the turns / holes for a given number of divisions. It can be done. When errors were evident in the Vertex HV6 chart, a spreadsheet brought to light other errors and omissions, so in the end it was time well spent.

Howard

JasonB11/12/2019 06:54:01
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Far simpler way than Howard's is to look how many degrees on the handwheel, you are likely to find it is 5deg

360/5 =72 Simples.

Michael Gilligan11/12/2019 08:01:05
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14599 forum posts
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Posted by ChrisB on 09/12/2019 14:43:35:

[…]

I disassembled the table and cleaned it from the grease and re-lubricated it. Looks fine to me.

[…]

20191209_130102.jpg

.

Gear Ratio ?? ... Mmm


Counting the teeth is [would have been?] another easy option.

angel MichaelG.

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