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Suggestions to pack round DC motor so bracket holds

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Chris TickTock02/12/2019 17:36:52
356 forum posts
25 photos

Hi I have a small 3mm ish gap between my 75 mm Dia DC motor and the 77 Dia mm bracket I have to hold it. There will be some torque but not too heavy duty. Obviously I wish to pack out the motor so when I tighten the metal clamp it holds the motor without turning when used.

I am thinking of some type of rubber tape or self adhesive tape but thought I would see if any one has any ideas.

Regards

Chris

Emgee02/12/2019 17:46:39
1405 forum posts
212 photos

You could use 3 or 4 (120 or 90 degrees) packing pieces between the 2 diameters, wood should be OK for small motor,

Emgee

bill ellis02/12/2019 18:03:12
71 forum posts
2 photos

A bit of old rubber matting or cushion flooring would be my choice, I'd steer clear of anything metal. Just ensure any cooling ducts are not blocked.

Mike Poole02/12/2019 18:19:05
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2446 forum posts
53 photos

A piece of inner tube could do the job but they are getting rare with even motorcycles using tubeless tyres, could be worth a cheeky visit to your favourite tyre fitting place.

Mike

Nimble02/12/2019 18:59:05
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33 forum posts

Hi Chris,

A possibility would be to use insertion rubber, available in a number of widths and thicknesses and available in nitrile and neoprenr which should prevent stickiness developing if there is any stray oil about.

Neil

Chris TickTock02/12/2019 19:26:42
356 forum posts
25 photos

Thanks Guys some really good ideas. Not sure what insertion rubber is but will find out.

Regards

Chris

Brian Oldford02/12/2019 19:27:29
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598 forum posts
4 photos

Would it be possible to wind a number of layers of self-amalgamating rubber tape around the motor body making sure you don't obstruct any ventilation holes?

 

Edited By Brian Oldford on 02/12/2019 19:27:40

peak402/12/2019 19:54:33
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1046 forum posts
98 photos

Go-cart tyres are a useful source of rubber; competition dry track ones being slicks give a nice even surface and the belting internally provides useful reinforcement.

Bill

Edited By peak4 on 02/12/2019 20:24:05

Chris TickTock02/12/2019 20:20:41
356 forum posts
25 photos
Posted by Brian Oldford on 02/12/2019 19:27:29:

Would it be possible to wind a number of layers of self-amalgamating rubber tape around the motor body making sure you don't obstruct any ventilation holes?

Edited By Brian Oldford on 02/12/2019 19:27:40

Hi Brian, yes it is certainly possible, I have just looked up what amalgamating means which I have understood to mean it bonds to itself to form one. Now that's fine but it would have to grip the body once the clamp was tightened. I suspect it would work. I am minded to use neoprene eithing from a sheet or washers as this material should stay consistent as it is often used for gaskits.

Chris

Grindstone Cowboy02/12/2019 20:38:04
217 forum posts
18 photos

+1 for the wood idea. A very handy source is coffee stirrers from your local coffee shop.

Michael Briggs02/12/2019 21:27:42
176 forum posts
9 photos

+1 Emgee, I like simple effective solutions.

Chris TickTock02/12/2019 21:35:12
356 forum posts
25 photos
Posted by Michael Briggs on 02/12/2019 21:27:42:

+1 Emgee, I like simple effective solutions.

Can anyone advocating the use of wood here give a reason why it might be better than for instance neoprene?

chris

Paul Kemp02/12/2019 21:43:12
391 forum posts
18 photos
Posted by Chris TickTock on 02/12/2019 21:35:12:
Posted by Michael Briggs on 02/12/2019 21:27:42:

+1 Emgee, I like simple effective solutions.

Can anyone advocating the use of wood here give a reason why it might be better than for instance neoprene?

chris

Assuming this is for your grinder 'project' it's probably a good idea to have the motor (thus the wheel) mounted rigidly in relation to the rest / what you are trying to grind (or lap).

Paul.

Chris TickTock02/12/2019 21:49:55
356 forum posts
25 photos
Posted by Paul Kemp on 02/12/2019 21:43:12:
Posted by Chris TickTock on 02/12/2019 21:35:12:
Posted by Michael Briggs on 02/12/2019 21:27:42:

+1 Emgee, I like simple effective solutions.

Can anyone advocating the use of wood here give a reason why it might be better than for instance neoprene?

chris

Assuming this is for your grinder 'project' it's probably a good idea to have the motor (thus the wheel) mounted rigidly in relation to the rest / what you are trying to grind (or lap).

Point taken that a rigid mount is important. However once clamped up neoprene I think would also be firm. There also exists if I use wood an increased risk of causing damage to the motor body as the load will be concentrated on the few points that the wood is positioned.. I agree I am being speculative but will try the neoprene first and the wood as my fall back position.

Thanks for all posts...appreciated

Chris

Paul.

Ian P02/12/2019 22:42:48
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2324 forum posts
95 photos
Posted by Chris TickTock on 02/12/2019 21:35:12:
Posted by Michael Briggs on 02/12/2019 21:27:42:

+1 Emgee, I like simple effective solutions.

Can anyone advocating the use of wood here give a reason why it might be better than for instance neoprene?

chris

Using natural resources is better for the environment.

IanP

Ian P02/12/2019 22:47:06
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2324 forum posts
95 photos
Posted by Chris TickTock on 02/12/2019 21:49:55:
Posted by Paul Kemp on 02/12/2019 21:43:12:
Posted by Chris TickTock on 02/12/2019 21:35:12:

Point taken that a rigid mount is important. However once clamped up neoprene I think would also be firm. There also exists if I use wood an increased risk of causing damage to the motor body as the load will be concentrated on the few points that the wood is positioned.. I agree I am being speculative but will try the neoprene first and the wood as my fall back position.

Thanks for all posts...appreciated

Chris

If the motor has a cylindrical body and no other mounting features than presumably the manufacturer will have designed the outer casing to withstand being clamped or held so no need to take any special precautions.

Ian P

not done it yet03/12/2019 09:45:30
4168 forum posts
15 photos

I think a better solution would be to make a proper bracket/holder to suit the motor and application. Rather than bodging something.

Michael Gilligan03/12/2019 10:06:30
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15024 forum posts
645 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 03/12/2019 09:45:30:

I think a better solution would be to make a proper bracket/holder to suit the motor and application. Rather than bodging something.

.

dont know What have you got against a simple bushing ?

Engineers have been using them since Noah was a lad.

MichaelG.

Ian P03/12/2019 10:20:52
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2324 forum posts
95 photos

I have nothing whatsoever against bushings if they are fit for purpose, although I would not describe go-cart tyres, inner tube rubber, amalgamating tape, Neoprene insertion ('insulation'?) rubber or strips of wood as being simple in the context of a holding the motor and therefore spindle of a grinding tool accurately located.

Maybe I have the wrong end of the stick and the motor being clamped carries a pulley for a belt drive so a resilient mount might be very appropriate.

Ian P

Michael Gilligan03/12/2019 10:28:35
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15024 forum posts
645 photos
Posted by Ian P on 03/12/2019 10:20:52:

I have nothing whatsoever against bushings if they are fit for purpose,

.

Ian, [for clarity]

My question was specifically a response to ‘not done it yet’

MichaelG.

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