By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Oct 22nd

Coke for brazing purposes

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Nick Clarke 323/10/2019 09:26:08
avatar
404 forum posts
12 photos

In older copies of the magazines it was always mentioned to pack work being brazed well with coke before brazing with paraffin blowlamps. Even as recent as the earlier Don Young and Tubal Cain articles.

Is there any reason why this is not used today? (or is it?) as coke or breeze is still available and as a way to generally heat a workpiece together with more localised heating it seems like it could still be useful.

SillyOldDuffer23/10/2019 10:02:58
4779 forum posts
1011 photos
Posted by Nick Clarke 3 on 23/10/2019 09:26:08:

In older copies of the magazines it was always mentioned to pack work being brazed well with coke before brazing with paraffin blowlamps. Even as recent as the earlier Don Young and Tubal Cain articles.

Is there any reason why this is not used today? (or is it?) as coke or breeze is still available and as a way to generally heat a workpiece together with more localised heating it seems like it could still be useful.

Is coke generally available? Last time I looked to buy some it was unobtainium in small quantities. (I did find a local coal merchant selling it by the ton.) Coke was common when domestic gas was made by baking coal but we all burn natural gas now. Now coke is specially made for steelworks etc and doesn't seem to be sold as ordinary fuel in bags. Or at least I couldn't find any!

Coke being porous and mostly carbon makes it a good insulator for hot work. Good stuff if you can find it. I'd look at Vermiculite instead, not because it's marvellous or cheap, but because it's available.

Dave

Mike Poole23/10/2019 10:59:33
avatar
2146 forum posts
52 photos

I suppose breeze blocks will soon be a thing of the past as one of the major ingredients was ash from coal fired power stations.

Mike

Clive Brown 123/10/2019 11:08:17
278 forum posts
7 photos

A benefit of using coke would be the extra heat generated by its combustion. This might be less useful now with the availability of poweful propane torches, compared with the fearsome 5 pint blowlamp of old.

not done it yet23/10/2019 11:12:10
3475 forum posts
15 photos

More ash and alkalis, but charcoal might be a reasonable substitute these days, if you really want to go that route for brazing. Arrange to do your brazing after the BBQ?

Vic23/10/2019 11:14:09
2298 forum posts
11 photos

Blacksmiths use Coke “beans”.

**LINK**

An alternative may be lumpwood charcoal?

Bazyle23/10/2019 12:28:30
avatar
4758 forum posts
187 photos

Coalite is a brand named supply of coke, in fact any of the 'smokeless' bagged fuel on garage forecourts will be coke. Coke is used in steelmaking instead of coal after driving off the sulphur and hydrocarbons that would contaminate the steel. These are the same constituents that cause smoke, smog and smells that the use of smokeless fuels avoids in clean air zones.

It was used as an insulator primarily in boilermaking but with the sort of advantage of also burning. if there was enough draught. In the 'fifties before north sea gas made gas heating cheaper than coal probably 95% of model engineers had coal and coke at home already. Charcoal would not be very good as it would catch and burn too readily.

Nick Clarke 323/10/2019 16:18:37
avatar
404 forum posts
12 photos
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 23/10/2019 10:02:58:
Is coke generally available? Last time I looked to buy some it was unobtainium in small quantities. (I did find a local coal merchant selling it by the ton.)

This is where I have seen it - close to me, but perhaps not to you.

LINK

Nick

julian atkins23/10/2019 20:24:28
avatar
1219 forum posts
353 photos

Hello Nick,

Go down to your local builders merchants and buy some Thermalite blocks or equivalent. Very cheap, and can be cut up if required with an old wood saw.

The 5 pint paraffin blow lamp used by Don Young on the only 2 boilers he ever made is a fearsome beast! I doubt if Don did use coke as a surround for his 2 boilers. I used a 5 pint paraffin blow lamp on the first joints on my first miniature locomotive boiler until I bought my Sievert set (propane). The heat output from a 5 pint paraffin blow lamp is quite something.

You would not want raw coke igniting when silver soldering a boiler. You want clean joints and heat that is controlled where you want it to be.

You need to take some of what Don Young wrote with a pinch of salt (hefty doses in places)! Don's 5"g LNER K1/1 boiler was probably silver soldered up in the works of J Samuel White. Don's 5"g IW O2 "Fishbourne" boiler was probably done by him with the old 5 pint blow lamp, but the loco never had a steam up on a track when completed, and was sold in the late 1960s (to Canada) and has never been seen since. Neither boiler ever had a club boiler certificate.

Don's only other loco was his 5"g Railmotor No.1 and Alec Farmer of Reeves made the boiler for Don.

Cheers,

Julian

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
Warco
Eccentric July 5 2018
TRANSWAVE Converters
Meridienne; London MES
cowbells
Eccentric Engineering
Ausee.com.au
ChesterUK
emcomachinetools
Allendale Electronics
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest