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Silent compressor problem

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daveb24/09/2019 22:16:18
623 forum posts
10 photos

I have a Bambi silent compressor. I used it recently for about 10 minutes and the compressor unit is running VERY hot. The oil level seems OK. Is this a fault or do they normally run hot?

Thanks. Daveb.

pgk pgk24/09/2019 22:34:46
1912 forum posts
288 photos

My dental compressor was bambi and I was never aware of it running hot.

pgk

Trevor Drabble24/09/2019 23:14:20
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211 forum posts
5 photos

Have you tried talking to Bambi in Birmingham ?

Trevor.

Brian Sweeting24/09/2019 23:40:40
443 forum posts
1 photos

Could be the compressor starter or capacitors at fault.

Robin25/09/2019 01:03:18
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355 forum posts

Mine got horribly hot for no good reason I could see and stopped working. I bought another one. The hot one cooled down and worked for another 2 years, still going strong.

Robert Atkinson 225/09/2019 07:16:33
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770 forum posts
17 photos

A company I worked for used lots of these and they should not run too hot to hold your hand on. Have you checked the oil level?
If that is OK the next thin to check is the capacitor (or thermal time delay relay if fitted, but most of these except the very small ones used a capacitor)

Robert G8RPI.

Roger Woollett25/09/2019 10:19:11
119 forum posts
4 photos

I have had this problem with a Bambi compressor. I decided the motor was only suitable for a quite low duty cycle. I had been using too much air and it got very hot.

Because of this the rubber diaphragm in the regulator failed. The first time this happened I got a replacement from Bambi. When that failed I found that it is a standard item. Machine Mart had them but I found one a lot cheaper on eBay.

Howard Lewis25/09/2019 12:26:58
3605 forum posts
2 photos

I had experience of a Bambi which seized, despite the oil level being OK. They do not seem to be intended to run on a high duty cycle. We wired the replacement into a timer circuit, so that it was only available for short set periods.

Is yours delivering air, satisfactorily?

This new one stopped delivering, and rattled. Cover off. A welsh washer, was no longer retained because the 1/4 UNF bolt had broken off, at the thread run out. Hard to remove the remains, but finally done. Made a guide "bung", drilled and tapped 1/2 UNF, and screwed in a stud with 1/2 UNF outer thread and 1/4 UNF internal thread at the outer end. Sealed welsh washer with Hylomar, topped up the oil (A colleague had tried running it the cover off - BAD move, but he won't rust! ) Compressor still performing happily some two years later.

Howard

Emgee25/09/2019 13:59:15
1715 forum posts
231 photos

Howard

Please explain what a welsh washer is used for, term I have never heard of.

Emgee

Mike Poole25/09/2019 14:06:13
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Moderator
2743 forum posts
64 photos

Try welch washer.

Mike

Neil Wyatt25/09/2019 17:36:27
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Moderator
18232 forum posts
714 photos
77 articles

Or even welch plug...?

Neil

daveb25/09/2019 22:37:20
623 forum posts
10 photos

Oil level is 1/2 way up the sight glass. After 10 minutes running the casing is much too hot to touch. Motor cuts off when pressure in tank reaches 100PSI. No noises except click when motor starts, very slight vibration when running. I haven't used it much, I bought it to use with my Bridgeport Spraymist coolant system, don't think it was running hot then. There is an external capacitor, I will replace it and see if matters improve.

Many thanks, help most appreciated.

Daveb

Brian Sweeting26/09/2019 00:13:21
443 forum posts
1 photos

Remember that these compressors are refrigerant compressors that are supposed to be cooled by the flow of refrigerant through them.

You should find somewhere in the instructions of your unit the recommended duty cycle. This should be designed to not overheat the motor by running too long and also not starting the motor more than a set number of times per hour.

Michael Gilligan26/09/2019 07:02:03
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16366 forum posts
714 photos
Posted by Brian Sweeting on 26/09/2019 00:13:21:

Remember that these compressors are refrigerant compressors that are supposed to be cooled by the flow of refrigerant through them.

You should find somewhere in the instructions of your unit the recommended duty cycle. This should be designed to not overheat the motor by running too long and also not starting the motor more than a set number of times per hour.

.

dont know What exactly do you mean by these compressors, Brian ?

MichaelG.

.

https://www.bambi-air.co.uk/

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 26/09/2019 07:02:32

BOB BLACKSHAW26/09/2019 09:23:52
338 forum posts
68 photos

I have a Jun Air the same type as the Bambi with similar problems.

I found CJS DIRECT COMPRESSERS 01213270395 Jeremy Foster very helpful, he sent me the manual for mine which is over 40 years old, I can strip it down and look for the problem.

Bob

Chris Gunn26/09/2019 10:26:06
337 forum posts
24 photos

The Bambi compressors are not all designed for continuous use, some were designed for applications where small amounts of air are needed intermittently. The manual states that the machine "can get quite hot in operation", and also "not to let the oil get hotter than 100 degrees c", which is also quite hot. I have a copy of the manual if anyone wants one, please send a pm.

Chris Gunn

Brian Sweeting26/09/2019 14:19:57
443 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 26/09/2019 07:02:03:
Posted by Brian Sweeting on 26/09/2019 00:13:21:

Remember that these compressors are refrigerant compressors that are supposed to be cooled by the flow of refrigerant through them.

You should find somewhere in the instructions of your unit the recommended duty cycle. This should be designed to not overheat the motor by running too long and also not starting the motor more than a set number of times per hour.

.

dont know What exactly do you mean by these compressors, Brian ?

MichaelG.

.

**LINK**

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 26/09/2019 07:02:32

Sorry, should have added "hermetic" type.

Howard Lewis26/09/2019 21:54:00
3605 forum posts
2 photos

The Bambi that I dealt with was a reciprocating piston type, not a diaphragm type, hence the oil sight glass, mentioned.

They do seem to be low duty cycle machines.

A welsh or welch washer is a slightly convex disc, usually of steel. When placed in a recess, (shouldered hole ) only slightly larger in diameter than itself,, and pressed or hammered into place, it expands and seals.

The one on the Bambi had been clamped in place by a long 1/4 UNF bolt, which had broken at the thread run out.

Refrigerator compressors tend to run hot if the reed valves leak

Howard

daveb30/09/2019 17:46:23
623 forum posts
10 photos

Bambi compressor BB24V

Thanks everyone. Capacitor seems OK, I fitted a new one, no difference. I previously used it with my Bridgeport Spraymist system, the air usage of which is fairly low. I noticed the compressor getting hot when I was blowing out some carburettor drillings which emptied the reservior two or three times, perhaps I'm expecting too much of it.

Daveb

Emgee30/09/2019 18:05:20
1715 forum posts
231 photos
Posted by Howard Lewis on 26/09/2019 21:54:00:

A welsh or welch washer is a slightly convex disc, usually of steel. When placed in a recess, (shouldered hole ) only slightly larger in diameter than itself,, and pressed or hammered into place, it expands and seals.

Howard

Thanks Howard, welch washer known to me as a "core plug", as used to blank off bores to water passages on IC engines blocks.

Emgee

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