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Bench block for small parts - ice hockey puck

Cheap product with many uses

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Robert Atkinson 215/09/2019 10:39:57
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1209 forum posts
20 photos

I thought this was well known, but have found no reference on here so I'll give this tip. Ice hockey pucks are cheap, a handy size and made from hard rubber. They make great bench blocks when hand filing or fitting small parts. Enough friction to stop the work piece moving, but won't damage surfaces (or tools if ou do slip. can be easily drilled, V slot cut or similar to locate parts. Also firm enough for backing up when driving small pins or collars etc. The rubber has filler and is quite "dead" so no bounce.
Put one no the cup of your trolley jack to stop slipping and damage.
They can be bought on ebay or Amazon as well as sporting goods stores. I tend to buy a few when I visit North America to save postage.

Robert G8RPI

ega15/09/2019 11:03:52
2539 forum posts
201 photos

I wonder whether, with a suitable slot, they would be heavy enough to make a stand for a mobile phone?

Robert Atkinson 215/09/2019 11:34:15
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1209 forum posts
20 photos

Plenty heavy enough to support a phone.

I do understand the urge to hit a "smart" phone with hammer but don't see why you need a holder to do itdevil

Bazyle15/09/2019 16:39:39
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6324 forum posts
222 photos

How machineable are they? Say if one needed something like a big pipe adaptor or a bung. Big BSP fittings are expensive.

OuBallie16/09/2019 02:42:32
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1166 forum posts
662 photos

Been using them for years.

Geoff - Hadn't thought of using one for phone support 👍

Massimo Dalmonte16/09/2019 08:54:06
33 forum posts
18 photos

Hi Robert G8RPI,

soon after reading your post, I bought 6 (4 of them will be used to make levelling feet for my milling machine) smiley.

Cheers,

Massimo

David Banham 120/09/2019 19:39:34
1 forum posts

The Toronto Society of Model Engineers web site resources page www.tsme.ca/resources has a Tips section.

The May2019 page has a tips sheet covering three items:

- Materials to validate CNC machining

- The good old hockey puck

- A very short rule

The use of a hockey puck for various activities in the workshop is discussed.

Michael Gilligan21/09/2019 20:40:20
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20183 forum posts
1053 photos

Wow ... I hadn't realised how economically priced they can be: **LINK**

https://www.amazon.co.uk/AYNEFY-Hockey-Classic-Training-Accessory/dp/B07V1QZWJH/ref=asc_df_B07V1QZWJH

MichaelG.

Donovan Kaardal11/09/2020 15:33:14
24 forum posts
46 photos

Hockey pucks are great - and they machine beautifully. I'm making some feet for my surface grinder right now.

foot.jpg

Michael Gilligan11/09/2020 16:26:25
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20183 forum posts
1053 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 21/09/2019 20:40:20:

Wow ... I hadn't realised how economically priced they can be: **LINK**

https://www.amazon.co.uk/AYNEFY-Hockey-Classic-Training-Accessory/dp/B07V1QZWJH/ref=asc_df_B07V1QZWJH

MichaelG.

.

I’ve just re-visited this thread, and that ^^^ link ... which had some very negative reviews !!

Thus demonstrating ... “if it seems too good to be true; it probably is”

MichaelG.

Thor 🇳🇴11/09/2020 16:37:12
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1630 forum posts
46 photos

I used hockey pucks to make levelling feet for my lathe several years ago. Here is a photo of I took during the fabrication (not yet finished):

hbm_08s.jpg

The pucks are easy to machine and has served me well for many years.

Thor

Raymond Anderson11/09/2020 17:20:34
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785 forum posts
152 photos

Sacrilege.... Hockey pucks are for HOCKEY. only joking, fine to see they have a few other uses in addition to their main purpose. Another area at which the little buggers really excel at is... demolishing parts of the human body. [ been there ] smiley

Nicholas Wheeler 111/09/2020 17:21:57
930 forum posts
87 photos

Screwed to a chunk of motorcycle tyre, they make good silencers for small bells. The good thing about this method is that the silencer does not have to be removed, just rotated around the ball of the clapper. Particularly handy for cramped bellfries with poor access

john halfpenny11/09/2020 20:49:07
236 forum posts
24 photos

I have use them for years as jack packers on my car lift and trolley jack (in a sensible and appropriate manner)

Georgineer13/09/2020 12:43:49
577 forum posts
32 photos
Posted by Nicholas Wheeler 1 on 11/09/2020 17:21:57:

Screwed to a chunk of motorcycle tyre, they make good silencers for small bells. The good thing about this method is that the silencer does not have to be removed, just rotated around the ball of the clapper. Particularly handy for cramped bellfries with poor access

Nick, can you explain this a bit more, please? I've used the traditional leather buffer for half-muffling tower bells (tenor 17 cwt) but can't visualise the setup you are describing and whether it would do the same job.

George B.

Nicholas Wheeler 113/09/2020 13:24:01
930 forum posts
87 photos
Posted by Georgineer on 13/09/2020 12:43:49:
Posted by Nicholas Wheeler 1 on 11/09/2020 17:21:57:

Screwed to a chunk of motorcycle tyre, they make good silencers for small bells. The good thing about this method is that the silencer does not have to be removed, just rotated around the ball of the clapper. Particularly handy for cramped bellfries with poor access

Nick, can you explain this a bit more, please? I've used the traditional leather buffer for half-muffling tower bells (tenor 17 cwt) but can't visualise the setup you are describing and whether it would do the same job.

George B.

George, this is to completely silence the bell for training and/or use with a simulator, it does not replace leather muffles. This LINK shows how the tyres are used; we've just added the pucks for durability as after three years use on light bells the tyres are rather, er, tyred.

Heavy bells are best sillenced in traditional ways, either by tying the clapper, or fitted wooden blocks. Your tenor suggests that this would be your best option

Nicholas Wheeler 113/09/2020 14:48:51
930 forum posts
87 photos

I remembered I had this pic of a finished silencer

Silencer.jpg

you can just see the cross cut into the tread, which fits tightly over the flight of the clapper. Once fitted, it's simply rotated to bring it into/out of use. This is a ring of 6 with a 6cwt tenor and access is poor, so going from open to silenced with just a twist of the silencer is a real boon

Georgineer13/09/2020 20:35:41
577 forum posts
32 photos

Thanks Nick, that's much clearer. For single silent practice we have a wooden stay which clamps round the clapper and holds it central, but that changes the handling of the bell. Your idea could be ideal for one of the lighter bells.

George B.

Nicholas Wheeler 113/09/2020 21:32:21
930 forum posts
87 photos
Posted by Georgineer on 13/09/2020 20:35:41:

Thanks Nick, that's much clearer. For single silent practice we have a wooden stay which clamps round the clapper and holds it central, but that changes the handling of the bell. Your idea could be ideal for one of the lighter bells.

George B.

I should point out, that the only part of it that was my idea was how to attach the pucks. And you're right, stationary clappers on small bells does change the handling. That is how we do ours, but they're much bigger.

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