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wire bender

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duncan webster07/09/2019 14:46:22
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2232 forum posts
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The bits of wire in the photo are connectors for track circuiting our 5"g track. They are made from 0.8mm stainless MIG wire. I need a couple of hundred for phase 2, and my wrist already hurts from making 10 off with round nose pliers. Anyone know where I can get a little gadget to form the 3mm diameter loops on the ends? The large radius arc comes naturally from being supplied on a coil, and the small angle bend (to get the ends in line) is easy enough with pliers as it's only a small rotationjumpers (small).jpg

Edited By duncan webster on 07/09/2019 14:46:58

3404607/09/2019 15:13:32
738 forum posts
8 photos

Would be interested to know what they are used for ?

Could you use crimp on ring terminals ?

Bill

3404607/09/2019 15:13:32
738 forum posts
8 photos

Duplicating for some reason

Edited By 34046 on 07/09/2019 15:23:54

3404607/09/2019 15:13:33
738 forum posts
8 photos

disgust

Not sure why duplicated 

Edited By 34046 on 07/09/2019 15:23:14

duncan webster07/09/2019 15:26:55
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2232 forum posts
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They are for linking the rails together in track circuits. Copper is a no-no, it corrodes like mad due to galvanic action against the aluminium rails (don't ask how I know). We've tried aluminium wire, but it is too soft, it relaxes under the bolts and comes loose, and is easily damaged giving rise to faults

Ron Laden07/09/2019 15:37:27
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1362 forum posts
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Duncan with so many to do would it not be a good idea to make a tool, need only be simple something like a small block (even a piece of timber) with a dowel pin or similar fitted and a pivoting lever along side which has another dowel. You place the wire between the dowels and pull the wire around to form the loop if you see what I mean.

Edited By Ron Laden on 07/09/2019 15:38:09

Edited By Ron Laden on 07/09/2019 15:51:02

Frank Gorse07/09/2019 15:53:40
26 forum posts

Duncan,in theory it should be the aluminium being attacked by the copper as copper is much higher up the galvanic hierarchy than aluminium - ally boats,particularly in tropical seawater,suffer terrible damage if painted with anti- fouling containing copper. Perhaps there’s something else going on there.?

duncan webster07/09/2019 16:02:20
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2232 forum posts
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Frank, perhaps loose language, something corrodes like mad, we don't have the same problem with SS.

Ron, I want to buy a tool, got far too many other jobs on the go to start making one, I just need pointing at where to get it

Edited By duncan webster on 07/09/2019 16:03:41

Edited By duncan webster on 07/09/2019 16:04:16

DC31k07/09/2019 16:15:21
59 forum posts
Posted by duncan webster on 07/09/2019 16:02:20:

I want to buy a tool, got far too many other jobs on the go to start making one, I just need pointing at where to get it

Put 'wire bender' into Google images. There is one common design that seems to be sold by many people, so make your choice of seller.

If there are many to do, stacking three or more wires on top of each other and pulling the loops all at once will speed things up. This is how small reinforcing bar is bent.

peak407/09/2019 16:41:02
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851 forum posts
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Duncan, can't help with the bender, but as regards the stainless/aluminium interface, make sure you coat it liberally with wax or something similar to keep out any moisture.
As a Landrover owner, having vehicles with aluminium alloy panels, I can assure you stainless and ali are not happy bedfellows. The alloy eventually turns to white dust wherever it's had a stainless nut and bolt through.

Bill

Ian P07/09/2019 20:45:34
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2175 forum posts
90 photos
Posted by peak4 on 07/09/2019 16:41:02:

Duncan, can't help with the bender, but as regards the stainless/aluminium interface, make sure you coat it liberally with wax or something similar to keep out any moisture.
As a Landrover owner, having vehicles with aluminium alloy panels, I can assure you stainless and ali are not happy bedfellows. The alloy eventually turns to white dust wherever it's had a stainless nut and bolt through.

Bill

+1 that SS and ali in contact with each other are not a good idea especially if there is any water involved such as the British climate!

For most SS fixings that I put in aluminium I use Tef-Gel. It is weird stuff that seems to be a mixture of grease and glue and its difficult to clean off things including fingers and hands, I have not found a solvent for it so it stays on threads and reduces the amount of galvanic corrosion.

Ian P

Paul Lousick08/09/2019 00:59:10
1168 forum posts
496 photos

Duncan

Have not seen a cheap shop bought wire bender but lots of simple benders shown on Youtube.

Paul

**LINK**

**LINK**

Michael Gilligan08/09/2019 07:49:42
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14011 forum posts
608 photos
Posted by duncan webster on 07/09/2019 14:46:22:

The bits of wire in the photo are connectors for track circuiting our 5"g track. They are made from 0.8mm stainless MIG wire. I need a couple of hundred for phase 2, and my wrist already hurts from making 10 off with round nose pliers. Anyone know where I can get a little gadget to form the 3mm diameter loops on the ends? The large radius arc comes naturally from being supplied on a coil, and the small angle bend (to get the ends in line) is easy enough with pliers as it's only a small rotationjumpers (small).jpg

.

Two pins [neatly beheaded round nails] in a plank is surely all you need to form the loops.

Make them in groups: Then use angled wire cutters [or perhaps a saw, or a triangular file] to separate the lengths.

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 08/09/2019 07:53:25

Michael Gilligan08/09/2019 09:34:57
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14011 forum posts
608 photos

Posted by Michael Gilligan on 08/09/2019 07:49:42:

.

Two pins [neatly beheaded round nails] in a plank is surely all you need to form the loops.

.

Hang the expense !

It might be better to use five pins, equispaced on a pitch circle

[ less wrapping around each pin would then be required ]

MichaelG.

Brian Oldford08/09/2019 09:56:29
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566 forum posts
4 photos

Forget the track circuits and use axle counters instead. wink

duncan webster08/09/2019 11:03:48
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2232 forum posts
32 photos

I've tried just bending round a nail, it works with copper, but not with SS, too springy. Using pliers you have to grip the wire and then sort of roll it along a flat metal surface. I'm going to try something more akin to a pipe bender, the bending pin on the proprietary ones looks too big. If it works I'll get back

We've looked into axle counters, or just short lengths of track circuit to act as interrupts, in fact the control board has the facility to do that, but can't figure out how to allow for trains being removed/added mid section (either at the normal access via swing link, or just lifted off/on) without a manual intervention. Experiment shows that magnet on the truck and reed switch on the track works well as a train detector, not sure how we'd make an axle detector, a very short length of track circuit isn't all that reliable, the wheel rail contact is not that good with steel wheels on aluminium, our logic allows for that, the section has to be clear for 5 seconds before the signal clears.

On the corrosion issue, we've had SS fishplates and bolts for quite a few years without any issue, and the first phase of signals has been in for nearly as long, Land Rover men have to contend with (road) salt water, perhaps that is more aggressive

Michael Gilligan08/09/2019 11:47:03
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14011 forum posts
608 photos
Posted by duncan webster on 08/09/2019 11:03:48:

I've tried just bending round a nail, it works with copper, but not with SS, too springy. Using pliers you have to grip the wire and then sort of roll it along a flat metal surface. I'm going to try something more akin to a pipe bender, the bending pin on the proprietary ones looks too big. If it works I'll get back

.

Good luck, Duncan

MichaelG.

ANDY CAWLEY09/09/2019 00:31:46
144 forum posts
42 photos

Life would be easier if you were to use annealed or soft stainless wire.

Edited By ANDY CAWLEY on 09/09/2019 00:32:43

Ian Skeldon 209/09/2019 09:41:57
388 forum posts
29 photos

Not cheap but This would solve your problem Duncan.

3404609/09/2019 09:47:59
738 forum posts
8 photos

Stainless steel crimp on lugs with the correct hole size are listed on the internet may be worth considering ?

Bill

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