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Why does the micrometer have a second knurled segment

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Chris TickTock05/09/2019 14:23:02
222 forum posts
8 photos

Hi just thought it time to make sure I can read a micrometer well. So first things first why the ratchet....answer to stop over tightening and ensure even force on jaws. So why have the second knurled segment which is tempting to use...would it not be better not to have this/

Chrismorreandwrightmicrometer.jpg

Clive Hartland05/09/2019 14:28:20
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2481 forum posts
40 photos

Chris. the small ratchet thumbwheel is to give a uniform pressure when measuring close tolerances, Thumb pressure on the large thimble can vary so much as to give odd readings.

Edited By Clive Hartland on 05/09/2019 14:28:36

colin hawes05/09/2019 14:29:35
502 forum posts
18 photos

When you have acquired the skill after frequent use you will find the "second" knurled knob gives a better feel on precision work and also that feel lets you know if a bit of debris is causing a false reading. Colin

Martin Hamilton 105/09/2019 14:35:13
145 forum posts

Because when you hold the mic with 1 hand & use it you have 1 finger which is normally little finger holding the curved body you would not be able to reach the ratchet knob at the end. The large knurled part is also handy when you want to open or close the mic down some distance you run the barrel up or down your arm.

MadMike05/09/2019 14:42:44
196 forum posts

Not wishing to be controversial, but is this a serious question?

Chris TickTock05/09/2019 16:01:44
222 forum posts
8 photos

Thanks Guys 3 helpful answers all helpful especially Martin's point of holding the mic in one hand which being a greenhorn I overlooked.

Chris

Neil Wyatt05/09/2019 17:19:34
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16738 forum posts
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The knurl on the main barrel is for spinning it quickly, as the ratchet can slip if you turn it too vigorously.

I read a test that showed even experienced users get more consistent results with the ratchet. I have also seen equally convincing claims that the opposite is true.

Certainly, the makers insist you should use the ratchet.

Neil

Howard Lewis05/09/2019 17:26:57
2439 forum posts
2 photos

A lot of people say that the Ratchet should be turned until it has clicked three times, to give a consistent pressure.

The narrow knurled ring set into the frame of the micrometer, is used to lock a reading.

In this way, then reading can be retained when the mic is removed; or it can be used a Go/No Go gauge.

Howard

Chris TickTock05/09/2019 17:37:02
222 forum posts
8 photos
Posted by Howard Lewis on 05/09/2019 17:26:57:

A lot of people say that the Ratchet should be turned until it has clicked three times, to give a consistent pressure.

The narrow knurled ring set into the frame of the micrometer, is used to lock a reading.

In this way, then reading can be retained when the mic is removed; or it can be used a Go/No Go gauge.

Howard

Thanks howard I forgot to ask what the narrow ring was for..thanks mate.

Chris

David Standing 105/09/2019 17:39:07
1280 forum posts
46 photos
Posted by MadMike on 05/09/2019 14:42:44:

Not wishing to be controversial, but is this a serious question?

I have suggested useful reading material to Chris on more than one occasion, he has not responded.

Book 6 in the Workshop Practice series, Measuring and Marking Materials, by Ivan Law, would answer this question too.

The preferred option appears to be to bombard the forum with questions instead.

3404605/09/2019 17:47:35
793 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by David Standing 1 on 05/09/2019 17:39:07:
Posted by MadMike on 05/09/2019 14:42:44:

Not wishing to be controversial, but is this a serious question?

I have suggested useful reading material to Chris on more than one occasion, he has not responded.

Book 6 in the Workshop Practice series, Measuring and Marking Materials, by Ivan Law, would answer this question too.

The preferred option appears to be to bombard the forum with questions instead.

You are not being controversial - you raise a valid point .

I think you just have to accept that there are members that do not like or want to, or have a problem with researching info.

So asking a question on the forum is the simpler option.

Not all bad, as often points arise that I have learnt from.

Bill

Howard Lewis05/09/2019 18:18:43
2439 forum posts
2 photos

Chris,

Although quite a bit of money can spent on building up a library of books, it will be money well spent.

None of us know everything, so we need books as a source of information to which we can refer.

Some books will be opened more often than others. That will depend on:

the state of your knowledge

what you want to do

how often you wish or need to perform that task.

As an instance, if you bash on regardless, you could spend more on replacing broken Taps, and spoiled workpieces, than if you had bought a book on Taps and Dies, and how to use them. Which just happens to be No 12 in the Workshop Practice series of books.

Other than for interest, there is not much point in buying books on the vertical milling machine, if you don't have one. Some of the info MAY be useful if you use a vertical slide to do a little milling in the lathe.

L H Sparey's "The Amateur's Lathe" is often cited as a good starting point, (Although this heavily features the 7 Series Myford, because this was almost the standard machine, when the book was written ) just as is Ian Bradley's "The Amateur's Workshop" and Tubal Cain's "Model Engineer's Handbook". This latter sees a lot use by me, and I've been in Engineering since 1958!

When you find a need for a book, buy it. You will refer to it more than once, although some less than others, but it will be there when you need info on that subject.

Find your local Model Engineering Society, and join it. There will be folk there prepared to guide you on your machine, or show you how on theirs.

You ask questions, in the hope of gaining knowledge, not to be laughed at. If I need information about my eyes, I ask an Opthalmist. I am an Engineer, not a medic. Should I wreck the control board on the mini lathe, I shall consult someone with good knowledge of electronics.

Keep climbing the learning curve.

Howard

Chris TickTock05/09/2019 21:30:41
222 forum posts
8 photos
Posted by David Standing 1 on 05/09/2019 17:39:07:
Posted by MadMike on 05/09/2019 14:42:44:

Not wishing to be controversial, but is this a serious question?

 

I have suggested useful reading material to Chris on more than one occasion, he has not responded.

Book 6 in the Workshop Practice series, Measuring and Marking Materials, by Ivan Law, would answer this question too.

The preferred option appears to be to bombard the forum with questions instead.

 

Thanks MadMike, May I in return to your reading recommendation suggest you read the bible and turn the other cheek the next time I post not to your obviously elevated taste.

Chris

Edited By Chris TickTock on 05/09/2019 21:45:57

Edited By Chris TickTock on 05/09/2019 21:49:40

Paul Kemp05/09/2019 21:57:45
316 forum posts
14 photos
Posted by Chris TickTock on 05/09/2019 21:30:41:
Posted by David Standing 1 on 05/09/2019 17:39:07:
Posted by MadMike on 05/09/2019 14:42:44:

Not wishing to be controversial, but is this a serious question?

I have suggested useful reading material to Chris on more than one occasion, he has not responded.

Book 6 in the Workshop Practice series, Measuring and Marking Materials, by Ivan Law, would answer this question too.

The preferred option appears to be to bombard the forum with questions instead.

Thanks MadMike, I will endeavor to make all future posts at your elevated level.

Chris

Chris,

With the greatest respect I have followed many of your question posts and the answers which seem to be perfectly valid. However the way your responses read to me seem to dispute most suggestions as not appropriate according to your answers already gained from your valued advisor. I am sure you do not really intend to come across as I interpret your responses and there is nothing wrong with questioning to properly evaluate a method or process but the way you do this perhaps does not encourage people to respond?

Paul.

Alan Waddington 205/09/2019 22:13:53
448 forum posts
86 photos

The second knurled grip is designed to afford the user better purchase when using the micrometer as a hammer during squaring operations and such like.

Michael Briggs05/09/2019 22:55:25
168 forum posts
9 photos

That’s a new one to me Alan, I thought the second knurled grip was to provide additional functionality as a G clamp. devil

paul rayner05/09/2019 22:56:25
134 forum posts
40 photos
Posted by Alan Waddington 2 on 05/09/2019 22:13:53:

The second knurled grip is designed to afford the user better purchase when using the micrometer as a hammer during squaring operations and such like.

well you learn something new every day, I didn't know you could use them as a hammer as well. I just use mine as a G cramp!surprise

Michael Briggs05/09/2019 22:58:47
168 forum posts
9 photos

Photo finish Paul, let’s call it a draw

paul rayner05/09/2019 23:15:33
134 forum posts
40 photos
Posted by Michael Briggs on 05/09/2019 22:58:47:

Photo finish Paul, let’s call it a draw

nah you win by exactly 60 seconds

paul rayner05/09/2019 23:18:03
134 forum posts
40 photos

or a C spanner smiley

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