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Mini mill or handtools for this job (rectangle with slots)

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Jim Dalton 102/09/2019 22:54:42
22 forum posts
3 photos

Hello all

The aluminum pieces in the link below look reasonably straightforward to make. Question is, would a pair of these be a realistic diy weekend project and if so, would it be achievable with hand tools?

If a mini mill is called for, would a Sieg x1 or x2 be up to the job?

https://tsoproducts.com/accessories/tds-10-dog-stops-for-20mm-worktops/

Paul Lousick02/09/2019 23:05:34
1286 forum posts
512 photos

Easily made with hand tools if a mill is not available. Any mill would do

Paul

Jim Dalton 102/09/2019 23:07:33
22 forum posts
3 photos

Thanks Paul. How would I go about doing this? Sorry this may be a really basic question.

Michael Gilligan02/09/2019 23:24:16
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14780 forum posts
635 photos
Posted by Paul Lousick on 02/09/2019 23:05:34:

Easily made with hand tools ...

.

dont know ... I've just looked at the photos: **LINK**

https://tsoproducts.com/accessories/tds-10-dog-stops-for-20mm-worktops/

MichaelG.

MadMike03/09/2019 00:08:31
198 forum posts

Jim if you have access to a Sieg mill then I would use it. It will give you a much better finish, repeated accuracy and in a fraction of the time you would take with hand tools. Although I have not made any of these I have recently made some aluminium adjustable brackets of similar proportions and with similar slots. They took minutes on my Sieg.

Paul Lousick03/09/2019 03:32:30
1286 forum posts
512 photos

Jim,

A mill would be the quickest and easiest method but not too hard to do it with hand tools.. Drill a series of holes (smaller than the width of the slot) and use a round file to cut between them. Then use a flat file to finish the slot to width. Or just a hole at either end of the slot, use a round file to make it big enough to insert a hack saw blade and saw down each side of the slot. Finish with a flat file.

Paul.

Michael Gilligan03/09/2019 06:31:57
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14780 forum posts
635 photos
Posted by Paul Lousick on 03/09/2019 03:32:30:

Jim,

A mill would be the quickest and easiest method but not too hard to do it with hand tools.. Drill a series of holes (smaller than the width of the slot) and use a round file to cut between them. Then use a flat file to finish the slot to width. Or just a hole at either end of the slot, use a round file to make it big enough to insert a hack saw blade and saw down each side of the slot. Finish with a flat file.

Paul.

.

Did you look at the fourth picture in the sequence, Paul ?

MichaelG.

Robert Atkinson 203/09/2019 07:18:32
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500 forum posts
21 photos

The slots are undercut so actually quite a challenge to make with hand tools. You would have make a lot to justify buying a mill.

Robert G8RPI.

Michael Gilligan03/09/2019 07:25:35
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14780 forum posts
635 photos
Posted by Robert Atkinson 2 on 03/09/2019 07:18:32:

The slots are undercut so actually quite a challenge to make with hand tools. You would have make a lot to justify buying a mill.

Robert G8RPI.

.

crying 2 ... You spoiled it, Robert

I was hoping that people might be encouraged to look for themselves.

MichaelG.

JasonB03/09/2019 07:26:43
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Moderator
17073 forum posts
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And with the larger slot being in the region of 25mm quite a large cutter for a small machine unless you opt for a smaller one and don't have rounded ends to the larger slot.

Robert Atkinson 203/09/2019 07:28:38
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500 forum posts
21 photos

Just a thought as these in light alloy and are for woodworking use you could just about use a router on lowest speed. Make up a jig in MDF rough out blanks with a hacksaw, chain drill the through slot first.....

Robert G8RPI

Michael Gilligan03/09/2019 07:33:10
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14780 forum posts
635 photos

Frankly ... Given the positive review of this product, and noting that these are really 'setting pieces' not 'clamps' ... I would say they are very good value at the price.

MichaelG.

Diogenes03/09/2019 07:51:52
37 forum posts
6 photos

I don't see why they couldn't be fabricated from two "L" shaped "sides" bridged with stepped ends to keep them rigid.

This would open up far more possibilities, as the steps could be cut with an end mill on any a small mill, or as Robert suggested, a router ( -table?), or you might even find that a suitable extrusion is already available..

not done it yet03/09/2019 08:16:27
3941 forum posts
15 photos

It could be more easily fabricated in two parts with hand tools if only personal use is contemplated. Depends on why the poster might wish to make rather than buy.

Nicholas Wheeler 103/09/2019 09:17:08
305 forum posts
19 photos

They're fairly simple to make, but on such a small mill will take ages compared to the cost of buying them. Time better spent on actually using them.

Derek Lane03/09/2019 10:21:07
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290 forum posts
68 photos

If as you say they will be made from Aluminum and you have a woodworking router you can buy router bit for that purpose but it will take several passes as most of them are designed for thinner material

Paul Lousick03/09/2019 10:25:57
1286 forum posts
512 photos

They are not precision machining jigs so why make them so complex ? They are used on a router/saw table and are located in drilled holes on a wooden top. The stepped slot is not necessary.

A simple slot in a piece of flat bar would be just as good and would not require the stepped location dowel/nut. It could be made from a piece of round bar with a tapped hole. The hand wheel could even be replaced with a standard bolt.

Paul.

clamp e.jpg

Neil Wyatt03/09/2019 10:39:55
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Moderator
17083 forum posts
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In your position, I'd use hand tools.

But I would make the slot the right width to fit the studs and get rid of the awkward step and use washers under the clamp knobs instead.

Alternatively use a wider slot and make stepped washers, if you have a lathe.

<edit> it seems the studs are 'loose' in which case, Paul's alternative will work fine.

Neil

Edited By Neil Wyatt on 03/09/2019 10:41:16

JasonB03/09/2019 10:46:32
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Moderator
17073 forum posts
1839 photos
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If you already have their dogs( or just about any other make) then you need the recess particularly for thin work as the top of the dogs is larger than the spigot that fits in the euro standard 20mm hole of the MFT.

If I were making some I would consider a hard plastic as the bare aluminium will mark work without anodizing to stop it. Also kinder on cutting edges if you have a mishap. I'd also make the dogs with flats to fit into the wider groove so they don't rotate when the knob is tightened.

 

 

Edited By JasonB on 03/09/2019 10:52:35

John Haine03/09/2019 10:58:26
2835 forum posts
141 photos

Corian. Cut with router.

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