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13 Practical Machining Projects

for Students and Beginners ...

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Michael Gilligan26/08/2019 09:54:45
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13800 forum posts
599 photos

Whilst searching to identify the punch that Chis made, I stumbled across this page: **LINK**

https://makeitfrommetal.com/13-practical-machining-projects-for-students-and-beginners/

It's very well presented, and the items are useful.

... and there is much more on the site.

In my opinion: Definitely worth a look.

MichaelG.

.

.

Note: The author is open about his affiliations:

[quote]

Make It From Metal is owned and operated by Jonathan Maes. Make It From Metal is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Make It From Metal also participates in affiliate programs with Bluehost, Clickbank, CJ, ShareASale, and other sites. Make It From Metal is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies.

[/quote]

Graham Meek26/08/2019 11:22:17
107 forum posts
113 photos

Thanks Michael,

A good few ideas on that site, and several useful tools too. There are two items I have been meaning to add to my toolbox for some time, so you have saved me time at the drawing board.

Regards

Gray,

Grotto27/08/2019 08:54:57
118 forum posts
71 photos

Thanks, some interesting tools there, and plans are easy (for me to follow).

I may have a go at his vice brake, bending sheet metal in my vice never turns out well.

Clive Foster27/08/2019 10:21:25
1802 forum posts
59 photos

Grotto

I bought a very similar vice brake tool from Axminster some years ago.

Currently £55 plus postage **LINK** . Decent value.

Works well but there is certain technique to getting the bend just where you want it and at exactly the right angle. Plan a practice run. Having the bending bar made in three unequal sections seems like a good idea to allow bending a small section but in practice I found the geometry usually doesn't work out very well so it could well be less useful than you might expect. Or maybe I just don't do the right things to exploit the feature.

Biggest limitation of this type of bender is that the size of the material is limited by either the depth of the vice or by the width of material that can be passed down the side. There are times when I've contemplated faking up deep leg vice style device to handle longer stuff. I'm sure that if the need to handle long sections were great there is scope for creativity.

Clive

Mick B127/08/2019 14:42:59
1151 forum posts
63 photos

Thanks, Michael - generally I'm mean about spending time on tooling projects when I'd rather be making bits for the railway or toys for the grandkids or gadgets for friends and family; but the hole centres gauge certainly looks useful enough to justify the work.

Jonathan Maes28/08/2019 02:49:40
3 forum posts

Hey, that's my website! How cool is that??

Glad you guys like it, this is where I put my spare effort.

@Clive you're dead on with it taking a bit of practice for getting the vise brake working the way you want it. I do think that it's a cool project though and a handy little tool for the bottom of your chest. Keep in mind that I'm used to working in machine shops with 8-10" vises, if you have a little one you might need to scale it down.

I'd really recommend giving those 123 blocks a go if you have the equipment, the way they bolt together will completely change the way you do surface table inspections.

Michael Gilligan28/08/2019 08:40:46
avatar
13800 forum posts
599 photos
Posted by Jonathan Maes on 28/08/2019 02:49:40:

Hey, that's my website! How cool is that??

Glad you guys like it, this is where I put my spare effort.

.

Welcome aboard, Jonathan

MichaelG.

.

Edit: Regarding the 123 blocks:

"The best thing about it is that the bolt heads are competely inside the blocks ..."

I would just mention that that's how the originals [for metrology, rather than work-holding] were made.

... and it's much easier to do that with Imperial cap-heads than the ugly Metric ones.

* 'though I do like your modified screws *

.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 28/08/2019 08:47:40

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 28/08/2019 09:04:55

Nicholas Farr28/08/2019 08:44:07
avatar
1941 forum posts
922 photos
Posted by Clive Foster on 27/08/2019 10:21:25:

Grotto

I bought a very similar vice brake tool from Axminster some years ago.

Currently £55 plus postage **LINK** . Decent value.

Works well but there is certain technique to getting the bend just where you want it and at exactly the right angle. Plan a practice run. Having the bending bar made in three unequal sections seems like a good idea to allow bending a small section but in practice I found the geometry usually doesn't work out very well so it could well be less useful than you might expect. Or maybe I just don't do the right things to exploit the feature.

Biggest limitation of this type of bender is that the size of the material is limited by either the depth of the vice or by the width of material that can be passed down the side. There are times when I've contemplated faking up deep leg vice style device to handle longer stuff. I'm sure that if the need to handle long sections were great there is scope for creativity.

Clive

Hi, I've used one from Waco for dedicated use in my Flypress **LINK**. Jonathan's one could adapted in just the same way, I would think. I've found using it in this way, is much more successful and better control. I like the Machinists hammer, and the depth gauge adaptions look very neat also.

Regards Nick.

P.S. click on the next photo in my link, to see a birds eye view of the backstop arrangement.

Edited By Nicholas Farr on 28/08/2019 08:47:20

Michael Gilligan28/08/2019 09:00:23
avatar
13800 forum posts
599 photos

Again regarding 123 blocks

Here's a link that I posted in 2018, which is worth a read:

Edit: Found it idea ... This is the best write-up I have seen:

**LINK**

Clive Foster28/08/2019 10:01:49
1802 forum posts
59 photos

Nicholas

Great idea to mount a that vice mounting Vee block bender in a press. Considering the Heath Robinson work around I used when doing that would have been much more satisfactory I feel really stupid.

No excuses for me either as we had a small bench top screw press with a similar set up, albeit with a loosely fixed blade and simple Vee block, in the lab workshop back in 1972 when I joined RARDE. First job. Used it a lot for alloy sheet chassis sections et al.

The bender is well worth making for vice use alone but if you have a press seriously consider figuring out an adapter fitting. Some jobs will go better in the vice some in the press. I imagine a couple of suitably sized bars for the magnets to grab, one fixed to the base and one fixed to the ram would do. Or use the Vee base and make a set of blades with a simple pin in slot carrier to go on the ram like the one at RARDE had.

Over to you Jonathon.

Micheal

Interesting history on the 1-2-3 blocks but I think incomplete. Certainly such connect together spacer systems were considered a normal thing at RARDE when I joined. One of the machine shop apprentice training scheme projects I think. Don't know for sure 'cos I was a scientist trainee, not shop.

I associate easy commercial availability with the lower cost import tooling boom. As I recall matters there were at least two or three vendors at the first Sandown Park Model Engineer exhibition. Don't recall when I got my set but showing them to a couple of the older guys at RARDE got a "Oh hum, whats new" reaction and a general agreement that such things were around in WW2. The only surprise was that they hadn't been generally commercially available, like Vee blocks, for years. Presuambly back in the day folk either made their own or they came down from the toolroom.

Clive

Neil Wyatt28/08/2019 15:42:49
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Moderator
16432 forum posts
685 photos
74 articles
Posted by Jonathan Maes on 28/08/2019 02:49:40:

Hey, that's my website! How cool is that??

Glad you guys like it, this is where I put my spare effort.

@Clive you're dead on with it taking a bit of practice for getting the vise brake working the way you want it. I do think that it's a cool project though and a handy little tool for the bottom of your chest. Keep in mind that I'm used to working in machine shops with 8-10" vises, if you have a little one you might need to scale it down.

I'd really recommend giving those 123 blocks a go if you have the equipment, the way they bolt together will completely change the way you do surface table inspections.

Some great builds Jonathan - the sort of thing we ought to see in MEW!

Funnily enough, an article in the issue we are printing this week mentions a magnetic vice brake, I must admit I hadn't come across one before - then two in a week or so!

Neil

Jonathan Maes31/08/2019 03:03:00
3 forum posts

Some great builds Jonathan - the sort of thing we ought to see in MEW!

Funnily enough, an article in the issue we are printing this week mentions a magnetic vice brake, I must admit I hadn't come across one before - then two in a week or so!

Neil

Thanks Neil, right now I'm working on a few how-to videos for a new YouTube channel I'm (eventually) launching, but I'm also working on putting together some build videos on some different projects I do. I do this for a living, so a lot of the stuff I'm not allowed to post publicly (something about governments not wanting their prototype additively manufactured exoskeletons and whatnot on public display, etc etc) but in between I do make a fair bit of tooling. Definitely want to do a series on designing machining fixtures too. Provided I can work up enough energy, that is. I got three kids and spare time is on short supply.

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