By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale July 23rd

Mystery Tooling

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Andy Carlson14/08/2019 14:00:02
77 forum posts
41 photos

A little puzzle for a rainy day.

I bought a circa 1930 Faircut lathe at the weekend. It came with a bunch of tooling, some of which I understand and some of which I dont.

This one is probaby the oddest.

p1060860.jpgp1060859.jpg

Bizibilder14/08/2019 14:06:51
avatar
60 forum posts
7 photos

Drill grinding jig.

Derek Lane14/08/2019 14:11:41
avatar
200 forum posts
48 photos

Plus one for drill sharpening jig I have one made by eclipse and if you need them I also have instructions for it's use

Dave Halford14/08/2019 14:11:57
439 forum posts
4 photos

Is there a tool post grinder to go with it?

Diogenes14/08/2019 14:19:08
25 forum posts
6 photos

It's a Reliance Drill Grinding Jig - there's at least one thread on here, I think, and a discussion and possibly instructions here;

www.lathes.co.uk/reliance/

A 'net search should throw up quite a bit more information ..it's safe to say that drill grinding attachments are er, widely discussed.. A search incorporating something like "Reliance Drill Jig Harold Hall" might yield something useful.

peak414/08/2019 17:06:05
avatar
813 forum posts
67 photos

Andy, here's one of the threads about sharpening initiated by me.
I quite like the Reliance; it certainly works better than the cheaper far eastern imports.

Bill

p.s. Andy, check your inbox.

Edited By peak4 on 14/08/2019 17:08:38

Andy Carlson14/08/2019 17:52:36
77 forum posts
41 photos

Thanks all - clearly not much of a mystery item at all then. I might even have figured it out if I could get past my assumption that the tooling that I bought with the lathe was tooling for the lathe.

Once cleaned up, the drill grinding jig should be handy now that I know what it is. I have been grinding drills by eye so far.

I dont think there is any evidence of grinding appliances having been used on the lathe but it's difficult to be certain.

The other three items that puzzled me are probably also not much of a mystery - I think I have a tentative explanation for each one but let's see what others think.

p1060858.jpgp1060861.jpgp1060862.jpg

Richard brown 114/08/2019 17:55:46
100 forum posts
31 photos

Hand turning rest

Potts milling attachment

And dont know

Andy Carlson14/08/2019 18:22:02
77 forum posts
41 photos

> Hand turning rest

That was my thought. It does seem an odd shape though compared with the graver rests that are used on watchmakers' lathes. Is it intended for hand gravers or some other tool?

> Potts milling attachment

Having looked at the lathes.co.uk page on these, I suspect mine is 'inspired by' rather than from Potts. Mine has a 1MT taper to take the tool and generally seems lower grade than the Potts products as well as lacking any sort of maker's identification. I need to figure out some sort of practical power source and drive arrangement for this.

> And dont know

I managed at least one mystery for one person then.

Michael Gilligan14/08/2019 18:33:01
avatar
13823 forum posts
603 photos
Posted by Andy Carlson on 14/08/2019 18:22:02:

... I need to figure out some sort of practical power source and drive arrangement for this.

.

I recommend that you get a copy of 'Milling in the Lathe'

MichaelG.

.

Edit: this is it ...

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Milling-Lathe-Edgar-T-Westbury/dp/B00133ZQRU

 

 

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 14/08/2019 18:35:32

old mart14/08/2019 21:04:07
444 forum posts
42 photos

I used to have a cheap copy of that sharpener, I gave up using it as I couldn't manage to get both flutes to match exactly.

Nigel Graham 214/08/2019 21:31:50
359 forum posts

No. 3 looks as if it's to fit T-slots. Not a rather crude travelling-steady, perhaps? The paint seems to match that on the hand-turning rest.

Andy Carlson14/08/2019 22:00:35
77 forum posts
41 photos

I dont think the paint will tell us much. The lathe is over 80 years old and has been painted on more than one occasion. The same green is under the current darker green on the machine itself.

I went out to the shed to try out my theory of what the third thing is for. A couple of photos to see if you agree. On the other hand it is quite wide for that job and it does look pretty blunt.

p1060865.jpgp1060866.jpg

Kiwi Bloke14/08/2019 22:24:23
227 forum posts
1 photos

Close... I think you're implying a parting tool. Thanks to the set-up pic, you've provided the clue - it's a travelling steady. Clever design for its simplicity.

Edited By Kiwi Bloke on 14/08/2019 22:24:55

Andy Carlson14/08/2019 22:43:02
77 forum posts
41 photos

Hmm... so you're thinking that I need to slacken the bolts and pivot the thing upwards so that the work sits in the cutout.

I think that could work but it's puzzling why the pointy end is set at or near centre height just now because I dont think it would be much use as a steady like that. A contemporary illustration would clinch it so maybe one will turn up one day.

Based on the fact that it's cast iron I'm guessing it's a bought item rather than something improvised by the owner (or at the very least a bought casting). I'm not sure if any of these things were Faircut made accessories or picked up as after market add-ons.

Interesting stuff. You just dont get all of these talking points with a brand new lathe.

Edited By Andy Carlson on 14/08/2019 22:44:16

peak414/08/2019 23:50:35
avatar
813 forum posts
67 photos

Re the travelling steady, is the blade made of bronze under all the crud, rather than steel?

It's not dissimilar in design to that of the Smart and Brown one.

Try this Google Search, when I've just done it, the first two images are of ebay items, there's also the Colchester one further on

Bill

Andy Carlson15/08/2019 13:57:45
77 forum posts
41 photos

I think I'm conviced that it is intended to be a steady.

I cleaned off the pointy bit and it looks like a bright steel of some sort. Checked with a magnet too and it's definitely ferrous. That seems non-ideal for a steady. The corners seem to have been given a very slight chamfer which would also indicate against it being a cutting tool.

I am wondering if some or all of these things are 'projects' and were actually made on the lathe - maybe the original owner bought some castings and did some self help to get more tooling.

DC31k16/08/2019 06:50:52
52 forum posts
Posted by Kiwi Bloke on 14/08/2019 22:24:23:

Thanks to the set-up pic, you've provided the clue - it's a travelling steady. Clever design for its simplicity.

It is a bit of an unusual travelling steady as it is bolted to the crosslide. To make it work, one would need to put the cut on with the topslide.

Michael Gilligan16/08/2019 07:42:34
avatar
13823 forum posts
603 photos
Posted by DC31k on 16/08/2019 06:50:52:
Posted by Kiwi Bloke on 14/08/2019 22:24:23:

Thanks to the set-up pic, you've provided the clue - it's a travelling steady. Clever design for its simplicity.

It is a bit of an unusual travelling steady as it is bolted to the crosslide. To make it work, one would need to put the cut on with the topslide.

.

Perhaps it is intended as a 'follower rest'

[similar function to the 'box tool' on a capstan lathe]

MichaelG.

.

Edit: Here's a baby version for the Sherline lathe:

https://www.sherline.com/product/1090-lathe-follower-rest/

... includes a useful description and instuctions 

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 16/08/2019 07:56:58

Andy Carlson16/08/2019 13:49:21
77 forum posts
41 photos
Posted by DC31k on 16/08/2019 06:50:52:
Posted by Kiwi Bloke on 14/08/2019 22:24:23:

Thanks to the set-up pic, you've provided the clue - it's a travelling steady. Clever design for its simplicity.

It is a bit of an unusual travelling steady as it is bolted to the crosslide. To make it work, one would need to put the cut on with the topslide.

Yes I see what you mean. I had another look at the saddle assembly today and the headstock side of the saddle is almost flush with the edge of the cross slide so I don't think there is anywhere obvious to attach the kind of travelling steady that I'm familiar with.

Still, using the topslide should work OK - certainly better than not having a travelling steady at all.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
ChesterUK
Advertise With Us
Eccentric Engineering
TRANSWAVE Converters
Meridienne oct 2019
Ausee.com.au
Warco
Eccentric July 5 2018
emcomachinetools
Allendale Electronics
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest