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Guess the Chemical?

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Neil Wyatt27/07/2019 16:48:17
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For a bit of fun, here are some excerpts from a Manufacturer's Data Sheet. Can anyone guess the chemical?

SECTION 4: First aid measures
4.1 Description of first aid measures
If inhaled
If breathed in, move person into fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration.
In case of skin contact
Wash off with soap and plenty of water.
In case of eye contact
Flush eyes with water as a precaution.
If swallowed
Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Rinse mouth with water.
4.2 Most important symptoms and effects, both acute and delayed
The most important known symptoms and effects are described in the labelling (see section 2.2) and/or in
section 11
4.3 Indication of any immediate medical attention and special treatment needed
No data available
SECTION 5: Firefighting measures
5.1 Extinguishing media
Suitable extinguishing media
Use water spray, alcohol-resistant foam, dry chemical or carbon dioxide.
5.2 Special hazards arising from the substance or mixture
No data available
5.3 Advice for firefighters
Wear self-contained breathing apparatus for firefighting if necessary.
SECTION 7: Handling and storage

7.2 Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities
Store in cool place. Keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place.

8.2 Exposure controls

Eye/face protection
Use equipment for eye protection tested and approved under appropriate government standards such as NIOSH (US) or EN 166(EU).
Skin protection
Handle with gloves. Gloves must be inspected prior to use. Use proper glove removal technique (without touching glove's outer surface) to avoid skin contact with this product. Dispose of contaminated gloves after use in accordance with applicable laws and good laboratory practices.
Wash and dry hands.
Body Protection
Impervious clothing, The type of protective equipment must be selected according to the concentration and amount of the dangerous substance at the specific workplace.

JasonB27/07/2019 16:53:12
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Does it begin with M?

John Rutzen27/07/2019 17:07:15
105 forum posts
1 photos

Common Salt?

SillyOldDuffer27/07/2019 17:08:49
4687 forum posts
1010 photos

Glycerol?

lfoggy27/07/2019 17:09:35
72 forum posts
5 photos

Those are all generic warnings so could be almost anything. I was going to guess sodium chloride as well but I will say sodium bicarbonate.

Robert Atkinson 227/07/2019 17:16:54
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Could be anything. I've noticed that a lot of Safety Data Sheets tend to err to the "safe" side with all sorts of over the top precautions. Not really helpful. Amongst other thingss if you put lots of nonsense on a well esablished materail it "dilutes" th importance of the precautions and can cause them to be ignored on worse materials.
Once had a customer send a sample of liquid they wanted us to test on a disenser we made/ They sent the MSDS and the health and safety officer said it was too dangerous. The MSDS required gloves, face mask and respirator. It was labeled light mineral oil (liquid parraffin in UK). Strangely enough the safety officer was happy for us to use baby oil!!!

Robert G8RPI.

Brian Baker 127/07/2019 17:19:24
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89 forum posts
13 photos

Some alcholic beverage?

BB

not done it yet27/07/2019 17:20:21
3339 forum posts
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Posted by JasonB on 27/07/2019 16:53:12:

Does it begin with M?

Milk?

ChrisB27/07/2019 17:39:40
397 forum posts
162 photos

Acetone or MEK

Nicholas Farr27/07/2019 17:47:36
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1975 forum posts
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Hi, it seems to reflect some white powder that was used by the company I used to work for many years ago. The powder was called Hydros, which I guess is a hydrogen compound. I never did know what it's exact definition was, but it was mixed with water and went into the process after being through an acid scrubbing process. Horrible smelling stuff and would take your breath away and would burn off rust, but any iron alloy that it came into contact with, would rust as soon as you let it dry. One danger side of it was, it was spontaneously combustible if it got damp, and that did happen once with a major fire ensuing as result with the fire brigade and chemical unit attending.

Regards Nick.

Edited By Nicholas Farr on 27/07/2019 17:52:59

SillyOldDuffer27/07/2019 18:09:50
4687 forum posts
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Posted by lfoggy on 27/07/2019 17:09:35:

Those are all generic warnings so could be almost anything.

Not quite, for example the Firefighting measures include: 'Suitable extinguishing media. Use water spray, alcohol-resistant foam, dry chemical or carbon dioxide.' So it burns, and can be put out by water. That eliminates all non-combustibles like Common Salt, but also Fats and Oils. The warning about alcohol resistant foam indicates this is an alcohol or something like an alcohol, perhaps a ketone.

Whatever it is it's relatively harmless. It's not Chlorine Trifluoride!

Dave

Robert Atkinson 227/07/2019 18:32:26
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Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 27/07/2019 18:09:50:
Posted by lfoggy on 27/07/2019 17:09:35:

Those are all generic warnings so could be almost anything.

Not quite, for example the Firefighting measures include: 'Suitable extinguishing media. Use water spray, alcohol-resistant foam, dry chemical or carbon dioxide.' So it burns, and can be put out by water. That eliminates all non-combustibles like Common Salt, but also Fats and Oils. The warning about alcohol resistant foam indicates this is an alcohol or something like an alcohol, perhaps a ketone.

Whatever it is it's relatively harmless. It's not Chlorine Trifluoride!

Dave

Sorry Dave see MSDS for salt from Fischer scientific similar firefighting (just plain foam though). I've never seen salt burn!

https://fscimage.fishersci.com/msds/21105.htm

Robert G8RPI.

 

Edited By Robert Atkinson 2 on 27/07/2019 18:43:53

Bizibilder27/07/2019 18:43:52
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60 forum posts
7 photos

Distilled (or deionised) water.

SillyOldDuffer27/07/2019 20:42:53
4687 forum posts
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Posted by Robert Atkinson 2 on 27/07/2019 18:32:26:
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 27/07/2019 18:09:50:
Posted by lfoggy on 27/07/2019 17:09:35:

Those are all generic warnings so could be almost anything.

Not quite, for example the Firefighting measures include: 'Suitable extinguishing media. Use water spray, alcohol-resistant foam, dry chemical or carbon dioxide.' So it burns, and can be put out by water. That eliminates all non-combustibles like Common Salt, but also Fats and Oils. The warning about alcohol resistant foam indicates this is an alcohol or something like an alcohol, perhaps a ketone.

Whatever it is it's relatively harmless. It's not Chlorine Trifluoride!

Dave

Sorry Dave see MSDS for salt from Fischer scientific similar firefighting (just plain foam though). I've never seen salt burn!

https://fscimage.fishersci.com/msds/21105.htm

Robert G8RPI.

Edited By Robert Atkinson 2 on 27/07/2019 18:43:53

Glad I'm not a fire-fighter. Spraying water on molten Sodium Chloride generates Hydrogen Chloride and the reaction is violent. I believe a cupful of molten salt tipped into a bucket of water goes bang.

Similarly spraying a lot of water onto red-hot coke normally puts the fire out. Obviously water is safe. Or is it? Not if the amount of water is kept low relative to the amount of coke. In suitable proportions and when hot enough, Carbon reacts with the water and converts it into a mixture of Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide. Which can go bang, and is toxic!

Don't think either disaster is likely to happen in my workshop! I reckon MSDS appear over-cautious in the face of common sense because they're covering what might happen in an industrial context. World of difference between salt on the dining table and several tons caught in a fierce fire, fire-brigade on the way.

Dave

Richard brown 127/07/2019 20:49:34
101 forum posts
31 photos

Marmite

Ian Johnson 127/07/2019 23:51:13
137 forum posts
32 photos

MSDS sheets are designed to scare people to death! And as others have said, this one could be anything, so I'll guess at weak Acetic Acid, it's what I pour over my chips. I prefer to call it by its proper name - Vinegar!

Sillyolddufferr mentions Sodium, I was an apprentice on the Sodium plant, if you melt salt (Sodium Chloride) you split it into its metallic compound Sodium and Chlorine gas (that's the Chloride). It was an interesting if scary place to work, watching the process guys on top of the cells puddling the molten sodium by hand! then It was cast into large ingots or transferred into a special heated road barrel. The plant was decommissioned in the 90's.

You put out a Sodium fire with salt, lots of salt!

Robin Graham28/07/2019 01:05:53
582 forum posts
129 photos

+1 for water - it's got to be nuts of Neil wouldn't have posted. Had a look at the MSDS for Cleanline deionised water:

Ingestion: Rinse mouth thoroughly with water. Give plenty of water to drink. Get medical attention if any discomfort continues.

Robin.

Ed Duffner28/07/2019 01:45:00
730 forum posts
61 photos

nitrocellulose lacquer?

Ed.

Alan Charleston28/07/2019 06:53:20
76 forum posts
19 photos

Ethanol?

Alan

Raymond Anderson28/07/2019 07:05:15
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723 forum posts
140 photos

No idea what it could be but... I know what it is not and that is... Chlorine Triflouride smile

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