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Rounded Torx Screw Removal

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Blue Heeler16/07/2019 00:35:12
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189 forum posts

I have a rounded Torx Screw in a lathe bit. Any hints on an easy removal method?

Cheers

Jim

Edited By Blue Heeler on 16/07/2019 00:46:25

Dinosaur Engineer16/07/2019 01:46:18
144 forum posts
4 photos

I had a damaged torx screw a few weeks ago on the underside tray of my VW golf. the correct size key was too small and the next std. size key was too big. My initial thought was to drill it out and fit a larger screw ., But I thought one idea was worth a try. I used a small ball pein hammer to spread the metal around the torx insert and then hammered the correct size key in. This worked a treat.

Speedy Builder516/07/2019 07:36:15
1815 forum posts
127 photos

Now the head is "mashed" up, try to ram anything in, even a flat screwdriver bit with some epoxy on the end. Let it set for a day and try that. Failing that, with safety goggles on, smash the insert which will leave the end of the Torx screw proud ?

BobH

Vasantha Abey16/07/2019 07:56:03
16 forum posts

get a concrete drill bit of the smallest size with a carbide tip, grind it carefully, the tip to the screw head diameter, with a positive rake angle or flat rake. Normally the concrete drill tips are with a negative rake, blunted to prevent shatter .

use a silicon carbide grinding wheel for this grinding business. then with slow speed drill out the head only, remove the tip and use a plier to remove the end

If you are an expert in welding, use a very thin welding electrode or may be a mig or tig and build on the screw and then weld a small steel rod end to the screw and you are then in business to remove the screw.

Andrew Evans16/07/2019 07:57:55
261 forum posts
1 photos

Left hand drill bit if you have one.

IanH16/07/2019 08:00:18
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60 forum posts
44 photos

Look up the thread “saving a tool holder” on here to see another way of doing it.

ian

Blue Heeler16/07/2019 08:19:13
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189 forum posts

Appreciate the advice so far all, I will be trying to get it out in the morning.

JohnF16/07/2019 08:35:31
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864 forum posts
102 photos

Use a Dremel or similar with a small cutting disc to make a screwdriver slot, then slightly round the screwdriver to match and it should come out. Did my Screwcutting tool years ago and still use a normal screwdriver because I am unable to purchase a new screw—- 1/8 x 40 Whitworth!

John

Baz16/07/2019 08:40:15
253 forum posts

+1 for the Dremel and thin cutting disk, I have got many screws out successfully this way.

magpie16/07/2019 08:55:56
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401 forum posts
77 photos

I think a lot of the problems with mangled screws, Torx, Phillips, Hex, Etc. is caused by dirt in the recess which prevents the driver from full engagement. Even when the dirt is finally cleaned out, the upper section of the recess has been rounded so there is now less surface area for the tool to grip. I see this happen so often and think when are folk going to learn, clean the dammed recess first.

Having said all of that, I do think that the recess in the Torx screws the Blue Heeler is referring to are often very shallow.

With the tool well supported, try using a small punch to hammer the screw head into shape, the lots of downward pressure whilst turning.

Just my two pennys worth.

Hollowpoint16/07/2019 11:03:43
216 forum posts
28 photos

I had the same problem with a second hand tool. I just hit the carbide tip with a chisel to break it. The screw then just came out by hand.

Howard Lewis16/07/2019 15:54:03
2327 forum posts
2 photos

+1 for "break the tip and remove it". With no load on the screw, it may well be easily removable. If not, at least the circumference of the head is now accessible for gripping in pliers / small mole wrench. Small, because we are talking 2.5mm thread.  Hopefully, this method removes the risk of ruing an expensive tool holder.

Howard

Edited By Howard Lewis on 16/07/2019 15:54:43

Mike Poole16/07/2019 16:06:59
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2106 forum posts
51 photos
Posted by Dinosaur Engineer on 16/07/2019 01:46:18:

I had a damaged torx screw a few weeks ago on the underside tray of my VW golf. the correct size key was too small and the next std. size key was too big. My initial thought was to drill it out and fit a larger screw ., But I thought one idea was worth a try. I used a small ball pein hammer to spread the metal around the torx insert and then hammered the correct size key in. This worked a treat.

Watch out for spline drive on VW, looks like Torx until you find your Torx bits don’t fit.

Mike

old mart16/07/2019 16:23:24
534 forum posts
43 photos

Those torx screws are not all that hard, so drilling the head is possible. Just look at a spare screw profile to see how deep to drill. The edges if the drill will be the worst for wear after hitting the hole in the insert, but its easy to re sharpen a drill.

As for cracking the carbide tip, don't just hit it, put the tool in a vise with the insert away from you and use a drift or chisel to stretch the screw a little. Do not try to knock the insert off, just loosen it. then the screw should turn easily.

peak416/07/2019 20:42:54
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844 forum posts
71 photos
Posted by IanH on 16/07/2019 08:00:18:

Look up the thread “saving a tool holder” on here to see another way of doing it.

ian

The search engine on here's not too bright, try "saving a toolholder" i.e. no space in the last word

Alternatively look HERE

https://www.model-engineer.co.uk/forums/postings.asp?th=135941

Bill

Blue Heeler17/07/2019 01:58:26
avatar
189 forum posts

Cheers all, broke the insert and the screw came out easily with pliers

Vic17/07/2019 09:12:33
2250 forum posts
11 photos
Posted by Hollowpoint on 16/07/2019 11:03:43:

I had the same problem with a second hand tool. I just hit the carbide tip with a chisel to break it. The screw then just came out by hand.

Good idea! You win the cigar! laugh

Hollowpoint17/07/2019 11:59:28
216 forum posts
28 photos
Posted by Vic on 17/07/2019 09:12:33:
Posted by Hollowpoint on 16/07/2019 11:03:43:

I had the same problem with a second hand tool. I just hit the carbide tip with a chisel to break it. The screw then just came out by hand.

Good idea! You win the cigar! laugh

I can't take credit for the idea I'm afraid. My Dad worked as a CNC machinist for a while and he told me this is how the workers dealt with carbide tips on damaged milling cutters.

Edited By Hollowpoint on 17/07/2019 12:01:03

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