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Scraping

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Pete Rimmer26/06/2019 19:49:32
332 forum posts
11 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 26/06/2019 14:43:32:

Posted by Martin Kyte on 26/06/2019 12:41:11:

... so in order to indicate the purpose it's better use the term frosting.

.

Martin,

Have you considered the wide range of available definitions of 'frosting' ?

angel MichaelG.

It's subjective, I would call frosting a decorative process, flaking an oil-retention process and scraping a fitting & alignment process but that doesn't mean the next guy agrees just like different people would call my bacon roll a cob a barm or a teacake. What counts is whether or not it's done appropriately IMO.

HOWARDT26/06/2019 21:17:48
419 forum posts
14 photos

I’ve always called it scraping, whatever it’s end purpose was, after all you wouldn’t want to make the surface worse than it was prior to further working. Even f you are breaking the surface to create an oil receptive one you would still need to check the dimensional/geometrical accuracy of the finished mating parts.

Mark Rand26/06/2019 23:14:54
711 forum posts
Posted by Pete Rimmer on 26/06/2019 19:49:32:

It's subjective, I would call frosting a decorative process, flaking an oil-retention process and scraping a fitting & alignment process but that doesn't mean the next guy agrees just like different people would call my bacon roll a cob a barm or a teacake. What counts is whether or not it's done appropriately IMO.

Connelly Refers to the 'half moon' oil retention process as frosting and the 'blocks of squares' decorative process as flaking.

Personally, I think he's got that bass-ackwards, but he wrote a book and I didn't.

Any company that puts half moon type gouges on the visible (and thereby subject to dust and grit) surfaces of ways should be sued for sabotaging their own products...

ronan walsh27/06/2019 01:28:57
530 forum posts
32 photos

I think scraping as a process has been put up on a pedestal and is being worshipped as a "long lost black art" by some. I think its like filing or hand fitting or something similar, not a process that is to be feared or to be overawed by. But to be undertaken with patience and common sense.

Pete Rimmer27/06/2019 06:09:23
332 forum posts
11 photos
Posted by Mark Rand on 26/06/2019 23:14:54:

Connelly Refers to the 'half moon' oil retention process as frosting and the 'blocks of squares' decorative process as flaking.

Personally, I think he's got that bass-ackwards, but he wrote a book and I didn't.

Any company that puts half moon type gouges on the visible (and thereby subject to dust and grit) surfaces of ways should be sued for sabotaging their own products...

I guess that I call flaking an oil retention process because Biax produce a tool for doing it and call it a flaker :D

Michael Gilligan27/06/2019 06:43:24
avatar
13253 forum posts
578 photos
Posted by ronan walsh on 27/06/2019 01:28:57:

I think scraping as a process has been put up on a pedestal and is being worshipped as a "long lost black art" by some. I think its like filing or hand fitting or something similar, not a process that is to be feared or to be overawed by. But to be undertaken with patience and common sense.

.

Hence my reference to the Whitworth book, which contains a clear concise description.

MichaelG.

Iain Downs27/06/2019 07:45:22
468 forum posts
351 photos

I've done some scraping. Well, I've tried to do some scraping. I've done quite a bit of work on my CMD10/X1 and that may have been one of the things which significantly improved it.

I've also had some success in scraping in the bearings of my steam engine.

However, my attempts at making a straight edge against a surface plate have cost me many hours of effort and resulted in going round in circles trying to get a consistent surface.

I think that there are some techniques which are quite hard to pick up without some kind of personal tuition.

That's what I've found anyway. The basic idea is simple, but getting to a 'professional level' is difficult. I've asked before on this forum if any time-server engineers would provide a course or tuition.

Iain

George Scopel30/06/2019 17:52:32
8 forum posts
2 photos

Thank you to all the replies and advise .. I will follow certainly look through the you tube for hints before I start scraping

Regards

George

Pete Rimmer30/06/2019 18:05:46
332 forum posts
11 photos

Where are you George? I have taught the basics of scraping to several people and they have taken it from there to improve their machines. My time is precious but if you're near North Kent and desperate to learn I could find a few hours spare.

Kiwi Bloke07/07/2019 09:52:28
187 forum posts
1 photos

One often sees deep crescent 'oil pockets' applied to the upper face of horizontal sliding ways. If these surfaces can be exposed in use, the pockets can accumulate fine, abrasive crud, not just oil. My belief is that the pockets should be a feature of the upper surface only, the lower being smooth, so the way wipers can keep the muck out. The problem is that visible crescents = $$$ of added showroom appeal. This isn't to say that the lower surface shouldn't be scraped, just that one should aim for a relatively smooth surface.

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