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Motorcycle 'blipping'...

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Former Member03/06/2019 14:52:26

[This posting has been removed]

Russell Eberhardt03/06/2019 15:21:34
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2494 forum posts
85 photos

I used to have to blip the throttle while changing down and double declutching on vintage cars without synchromesh. Blipping while stationary might be necessary on a racing bike with "cold" plugs to prevent oiling.

I suspect most riders just like the noise!

Russell

Vic03/06/2019 15:36:12
2309 forum posts
12 photos

Russell has it right. It’s just mental thing with bike riders, they all seem to do it.

Fowlers Fury03/06/2019 16:17:58
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326 forum posts
72 photos

Not with modern bikes I suppose but with my old Brit bike, when stopped and ticking over you had to blip the throttle once after pulling the clutch lever to free the clutch plates in order to engage 1st.

Irrelevant addition follows:-
Multi-plate clutch with cork inserts running in oil - terrible combination. Adjust clutch push rod when cold & clutch wouldn't release when hot, adjust when hot & it would slip when cold......or was it t'other way round??
I once rebuilt the clutch plates with new cork inserts supplied by spares seller which were composition i.e. like cork table mats. Five miles from home and the plates were seized together necessitating bike rescue. Once home I acquired numerous bottle corks and had to slice them all to fit but no more trouble.

John Reese03/06/2019 16:27:24
791 forum posts

Rednecks do it in cars.

Barrie Lever03/06/2019 16:44:36
323 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by Haggerleases on 03/06/2019 14:52:26:

Can anyone tell me why it is that motorcycles are seemingly unable to achieve a stable tickover? Every time I see a motorcycle stationary with it's engine running, or slowing down, the rider seems to have to 'blip' the throttle repeatedly.

A modern superbike engine is a masterpiece of combustion engineering, they will sit ticking over for ages and then just pick up as if nothing happened, some of the engines have such a huge rev range that the bikes can touch 100mph in first gear.

Blipping on down changes does seem to make matching the engine speed to the next gear a little easier, I think it might be because the RPM is decreasing from the blip as the clutch is re-engaged making the final matching of RPM easier than if the engine RPM was too low.

2 strokes are another thing regarding staionary blipping, that is to keep the engine from gassing up, there is nothing like the sound of a 2 stroke 500 GP bike being warmed up in the pits.

B.

colin brannigan03/06/2019 16:45:11
57 forum posts
12 photos

Sorry my attempt to add a photo failed.

 

Edited By colin brannigan on 03/06/2019 16:51:59

Mike Poole03/06/2019 17:00:25
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2155 forum posts
52 photos

A bike that is properly set up and in good condition will idle quite happily, worn carbs make achieving a slow idle very difficult. If the engine is tuned and has lightened flywheels/crank then it can be impossible to get a slow speed idle. As said above it is just nice to do it. As bikes tend not to have heavy flywheels it is useful to blip the throttle when changing down as the engine slows very quickly when the throttle is closed and so blipping the throttle matches the engine to the road speed and makes a much smoother downchange.

Mike

Edited By Mike Poole on 03/06/2019 17:01:10

ronan walsh03/06/2019 17:37:07
539 forum posts
32 photos

Because Amal carbs , as fitted to older british bikes, are made of metal that makes lead look like through hardened die steel. They wear quickly, so if you set up tick over when the engine is cold, the tick over is too high when the engine warms up. Then if you adjust the tick over when the engine is hot, it won't tick over when cold.

But with modern bikes with fuel injection, electronic ignition and all sorts of electronics monitoring everything 200 times a second, blipping is not needed.

Former Member03/06/2019 18:02:48

[This posting has been removed]

Chris Evans 603/06/2019 18:33:26
1491 forum posts

I've ridden bikes for 55 years and still do. I think Haggerleases comments have very little grounds for reality. I and most others I know ride sensibly and with a desire to ride again tomorrow.

Mike Poole03/06/2019 18:42:18
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2155 forum posts
52 photos

A bike is not just transport, it is very satisfying to push the bike and yourself and explore the limits, you may say that should be done on a racetrack but to my mind that is a different experience. With a modern sports bike capable of near 200mph there are not many people who would be safe at that speed and nobody if you are sharing the road with other users. Speed limits are very artificial and implemented for a variety of reasons. The IOM TT course is a closed road where In normal times some speed limits apply, an average speed of over 130mph through many towns and villages shows what the machines and riders can do. Fans can taste the experience on Mad Sunday when the mountain section is made one way and no speed limit, most people do survive this and I would say this is some of the best fun you can have without getting undressed. Well it is if you’re a bikersmiley

Mike

JA03/06/2019 19:07:04
793 forum posts
44 photos
Posted by ronan walsh on 03/06/2019 17:37:07:

Because Amal carbs , as fitted to older british bikes, are made of metal that makes lead look like through hardened die steel. They wear quickly, so if you set up tick over when the engine is cold, the tick over is too high when the engine warms up. Then if you adjust the tick over when the engine is hot, it won't tick over when cold.

I got the tick over back on my two old British bikes by fitting new AMAL carburettors. They are being made again and the same rubbish die-casting alloy appears to be used. Someone will have the same problem in about 30 years time. The alternative to AMAL is to fit a Japanese Makuni. They are made from good aluminium and are altogether better designed and made.

JA

Paul Kemp03/06/2019 19:28:44
313 forum posts
14 photos
Posted by Chris Evans 6 on 03/06/2019 18:33:26:

I've ridden bikes for 55 years and still do. I think Haggerleases comments have very little grounds for reality. I and most others I know ride sensibly and with a desire to ride again tomorrow.

Try driving London bound on the M2 / A2 in the morning and the opposite way in the evening! I unfortunately have to do this fairly regularly and having ridden bikes myself I still have palpitations watching the antics, get on centre white line between lanes, open throttle and try to weave between anything that may be in your path - it's worse on the multi lane sections if you are in a car at 60 (you can rarely get to 70 and more often 15 is optimistic!) but at 60 you can have the pleasure of being both undertaken and overtaken by bikes on either side between the adjacent cars - not even waiting for a gap! I have had my mirror clouted twice in the last fortnight and saw one come to grief. Maybe things are different in your neck of the woods! I rode bikes for many years and did a few track days but the way bikers behave now scares me!

Paul.

Bill Phinn03/06/2019 19:29:26
210 forum posts
41 photos
Posted by Haggerleases on 03/06/2019 14:52:26:

Can anyone tell me why it is that motorcycles are seemingly unable to achieve a stable tickover? Every time I see a motorcycle stationary with it's engine running, or slowing down, the rider seems to have to 'blip' the throttle repeatedly.

 

I think the question has been answered satisfactorily already, but I'll add my two penn'orth.

In the days when I used to ride motorbikes (ranging from 50cc to 1000cc) I always blipped the throttle on change downs (for reasons given here), but only ever used to blip the throttle when stationary on the rare occasions when there was a temporary fuel/carb/ignition/breathing problem that meant the engine wouldn't idle steadily and was at risk of cutting out.

As Barrie says, two strokes benefit more than four strokes from being blipped at idle. My memory is hazy, but my feeling was that doing this minimised the chances of the engine "bogging" when power was suddenly called for when you became mobile again. Certainly bogging is sometimes a problem with two stroke garden machinery (which I have a quite a lot of), but I've learned to adjust the factory carb settings to minimize this and create virtually instant throttle response from idle on all the two stroke equipment I own.

Edited By Bill Phinn on 03/06/2019 19:30:34

David Davies 803/06/2019 20:03:49
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45 forum posts

For what it's worth I believe that the AMAL GP carburettor, as fitted to racing bikes (Manx Norton, AJS 7R etc), had no stop screw for the slide. The rider had to keep the engine running in the paddock by blipping the throttle whilst warming up prior to the race. The slide was hanging on the cable, which had to have some slack to accommodate handlebar movement so if the twistgrip was released the throttle was well and truly shut.

Rumour also has it that the British motorcycle industry would not pay AMAL enough for them to improve on the inferior metal used for the carbs of production bikes. If the slide had been made of a dissimilar metal that would have helped. In the (impoverished) past I have skimmed AMAL slides and fitted a brass sleeve to them in an effort to improve the fit in an otherwise worn out body.

I don't blip my BMW R75/7 which is 43 years old, has the original Bing CD carbs and ticks over like a watch.

None of this is really relevant to the OP but there you go!

Cheers

Dave

Roddy Scott03/06/2019 22:44:02
4 forum posts

I'm fairly sure the original question is a little tongue in cheek but as a biker I wonder the same thing. Usually, if it's a modern bike it's 'look at me' (not realising how irritating they are to others) but a very small number of bikes do not idle too well. High lift, long duration cams in a tuned engine can make idle a little erratic but they're few and far between on the roads.

Mostly it's 1 imho

not done it yet04/06/2019 05:40:28
3494 forum posts
15 photos

Some modern machines have automatic ‘blippers’ when changing gear. Just another bit of expensive electronic wizardry available to the serious bike riders. Matching engine revs to gear ratio can be important at high speed. Little different from ABS, traction control, etc on modern superbikes.

Pete Rimmer04/06/2019 05:55:10
446 forum posts
18 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 04/06/2019 05:40:28:

Some modern machines have automatic ‘blippers’ when changing gear. Just another bit of expensive electronic wizardry available to the serious bike riders. Matching engine revs to gear ratio can be important at high speed. Little different from ABS, traction control, etc on modern superbikes.

I never heard of this. I don't deny that there might be some kind of aftermarket 'blipper' but I never heard of it and know of no factory bike that has the feature nor would I find it desirable.

For fast up-changes you can get quick-shifters, those are quite common but they simply kill the ignition momentarily - usually around 30ms - and I'm sure you can get some which cause a backfire when the change is done because I've followed bikes that backfired on every change though the one I had on my landspeed bike for a while didn't cause it.

There is unit designed for disabled bikers that power-shifts up and down, I don't know if perhaps that has a blipper function for the down-shifts. It's a large ungainly solenoid that most people would not put on their bike if they didn't have to.

colin wilkinson04/06/2019 07:39:20
57 forum posts

Pete, Ducati V4 has auto blipper and cornering ABS, BMW S1000RR has auto blipper as well. Yamaha R1 is rumoured to be using a seamless shift gearbox from next year as used on MotoGP M1. Colin

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