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Getting rid of the garage door...........

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Andrew Johnston25/05/2019 13:00:38
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4649 forum posts
522 photos

You need to be careful, removing the garage door may be seen as a change of use by the local council. As far as I'm aware there's nothing to stop you fitting out a workshop in a garage. But removing the door and replacing it with a wall/window may be seen as an attempt to convert the garage to a habitable room, in which planning permission is required.

Andrew

Georgineer25/05/2019 13:52:37
237 forum posts
13 photos
Posted by OuBallie on 25/05/2019 11:51:12:

I converted my Up & Over into a side hinged door, and released all the space it needed to swing up.

I replaced mine with a pair of traditional, side-hung wooden doors, and it's a huge improvement. I only need to open one most of the time and access is so much more convenient. They are held by locking sliding stays which stops them opening much more than 90 degrees, so they don't flap about in the wind. And I can sling a tarpaulin over the tops to make a sun or rain shelter when needed.

Inside I have done as others have, and constructed a stud wall to make an insulated 'snug' for clean and warm work. I made the wall very substantial so I can hang pretty much whatever I want on it without any danger of it letting go.

George

Phil Whitley25/05/2019 18:46:36
835 forum posts
105 photos

one of my doors was an up and over, swapped it for a s/h roller shutter, cheap, and more secure, and plenty for sale!

Morty25/05/2019 18:49:12
17 forum posts

Hi Everyone!

Once again, thanks for the interest in My thread, it is really great to recieve such sound and useful advice!

Geoff, thanks for the warning about the door springs, I fitted this door as a replacement many Years ago so I was aware of potential dangers, but thanks anyway!

John H :- Notedwink!

I omitted to mention that We unfortunately have a shared drive, which consequently entails parking My car tight up against the garage door to allow the neighbour access to Their parking space, this was the reason for fitting a side entrance door to save having to move the car to access the garage (the car has to be moved onto the road,if I can find a space anywhere!)

So Basically, the main garage door is rarely used, it was opened a couple of weeks ago to get My lathe in, the last time it was opened was to paint it, seven years ago!!

The only other large piece of equipment left to come in will be a mill, I thinking table top,at the most a Centec 2, which will be pulled in before any door alterations take place.

As for projects,I think stationary engines and large static veteren vehicles (up to 1/8 scale ) will be My maximum, so not a problem there.

Looking outwards from the garage,I really think a 'U' shaped layout will work best for Me, with a bench across the garage doorway, lathe to my left, mill maybe on the bench in left-hand the corner at 45deg, Bench in front of Me with vice on right hand side, then the entrance door and finally,on My right,the grinder and hot work bench.

Cupboards under the long bench will take care of tooling stoage, plus My Lathe (Super 7) is on a Myford stand,so storage in there too, plus there will be room above the lathe for shelving or shadow boards for lightweight storage.

The roof above the working area will be insulated and panelled off,at the far end of the garage left open for roof storage of long stock items.I hav'nt got a scrap bin,not made any(yet!)

We are not planning on moving in the future,but I know things can change,so everything I'm thinking of doing (including a full upvc panel with top window),could be reversed if necessary.

Howard. duckboards were My thought too,or rubber matting(found a relatively cheap supply on Ebay,thought of lining the cupboard shelves as well)

As for lighting, I'm thinking 3x 5' tube fittings. plus lamps for the machines will give Me what I need.

Andrew:-

I did have a look online as to planning considerations,two things I found were if a brick wall were used,additional footings could be required, not a problem with a upvc unit, the other thing was loss of car parking space,not an issue because We have never had a car in it! But I will check before moving forward.

Once again,many good ideas to consider, I know that setting up a workshop is always a 'work in progress', but planning as much as possible in advance is always a good idea!

Again, many thanks to Everybody for their help and advice, I am overwhelmed by the helpfulness and friendliness of Your responses!

Cheers, Pete

Edited By Morty on 25/05/2019 18:54:23

Edited By Morty on 25/05/2019 18:56:12

Will Bells25/05/2019 19:42:50
152 forum posts
7 photos

Hi Pete - slight variation on the themes above, but my two penny worth .....

I kept my up and over doors and skinned them on the inside and added insulation between them. I then added additional rubber sealing all around the gaps. They still open normally.

I then added additional insulated panels on the inside. These were made in two parts per door so that I could manoeuvre them and they were well sealed, but made to be removed for occasional machines to be installed when required, although this is not quick. This does have the added advantage that nobody is going to break in via those doors without working for it and making a lot of noise !!

The whole garage is insulated and is kept toasty warm and condensation free all year round. No regrets.

- Will

peak425/05/2019 20:04:10
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743 forum posts
65 photos

And another variation on the theme of keeping the a door, but in this case replacing it with a sectional, rather than an up and over.

A sectional door works in a similar fashion to a roller shutter, but without needing the headroom for the roller. Thus ut can be opened without any need for you to move the car.

I've just moved house and had a second garage built, the original one having a pair of conventional up and over doors. I.e. I can't park close to them, whilst being able to open the doors.

The new garage has a vertical opening sectional door 40mm thick and insulated. It suppresses noise to save disturbing the neighbours, as well as allowing close parking.
You might find that with one of those, the door does actually get used in the summer. It's also very good for blowing out dust with a garden leaf blower, though my neighbours are more distant than yours.

Mine came from GarageDoorsOnLine who were friendly, helpful and well priced.

https://www.garagedoorsonline.co.uk/shop/Sectional+Door

Bill

Neil Wyatt25/05/2019 23:10:42
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15986 forum posts
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Posted by Andrew Johnston on 25/05/2019 13:00:38:

You need to be careful, removing the garage door may be seen as a change of use by the local council. As far as I'm aware there's nothing to stop you fitting out a workshop in a garage. But removing the door and replacing it with a wall/window may be seen as an attempt to convert the garage to a habitable room, in which planning permission is required.

Andrew

No it doesn't, as long as you don't plan to make it a separate residence.

www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200130/common_projects/25/garage_conversion

I commend the planning portal to anyone with planning queries.

Neil

not done it yet26/05/2019 07:21:16
2933 forum posts
11 photos

My workshop is virtually sealed and light-tight. At least 100mm insulation all round, except thinner on the access door. The lighting costs are less than the otherwise heating needs, by far.

I use a desiccant dehumidifier (only one, currently) as a heat source and for humidity control during the cooler months. Can be cooler in summer months, too. I have a fridge ‘cooling panel’, waiting in the wings, should I need to install it for summer cooling duties.

I had to move in my Centec 2B after dismantling it (too heavy, otherwise!). Nothing wider than 250mm for a 2/2A or 225mm for a 2B, I think. Stand is a different matter, dependent on type!

I have a sectional door. A roller shutter, if space permits, would allow greater roof storage. My lighting is totally of LED type.

A solar powered installation should be considered for the household - can still be viable even with ‘feed in tariffs’ no longer available. No ‘regulation need’ for a ‘certified’ PV installer or new kit, now that the FITS have gone. Only real difficulty is fixing panels to the roof - and at least getting the electrical installation signed off by a qualified electrician.

Cooling and lighting, in a PV-installed dwelling, could cost virtually nothing on the leccy bill during the spring to autumn period.

Malcolm Jones 126/05/2019 08:08:40
13 forum posts
4 photos

Neil it right you do not need planning permission to convert a garage in to habitable space but you will need Building Regulation approval.

Malcolm

Morty26/05/2019 11:05:58
17 forum posts

My Wife may turn it into a permanent residence...............................surprise!

Pete

John Haine26/05/2019 11:50:17
2512 forum posts
132 photos

On the question of access, my workshop (a subdivision of the garage) has a standard door - 800 mm? - and both a Myford S7 on stand and a VMB went in through the door (VMB then got poppeed on a home made wooden stand).

Neil Wyatt26/05/2019 12:18:11
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15986 forum posts
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Posted by not done it yet on 26/05/2019 07:21:16:

A solar powered installation should be considered for the household - can still be viable even with ‘feed in tariffs’ no longer available. No ‘regulation need’ for a ‘certified’ PV installer or new kit, now that the FITS have gone. Only real difficulty is fixing panels to the roof - and at least getting the electrical installation signed off by a qualified electrician.

Still available, just no longer as generous as they were (by a country mile).

Neil

Samsaranda26/05/2019 12:50:08
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697 forum posts
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Was under the impression that feed in tariffs no longer available for new PV installs after the end of March 2019, I had my installation completed in Dec 2018 and was urged to make sure it was before end of March 2019 because fits for new installs ceased to be available then. I may be wrong, always am according to wife, worth checking before committing to a project.

Dave W

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