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A Unique Word?

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Neil Wyatt26/04/2019 13:12:37
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As topslide is a legitimate word... by extension so is crossslide.

Is it the only word in the English language with three 'esses' in a row?

Neil

Nick Clarke 326/04/2019 13:19:46
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If you allow apostrophes then the possessive form of someone called Bess would be Bess's - and similarly for Tess, however at least one online dictionary hyphenates cross-slide.

Another word with multiple esses is the one you use when you are slamming a quick release bench vice shut and you catch your finger in it - sssssssssssssssssssssss!

Edited By Nick Clarke 3 on 26/04/2019 13:27:15

Mick B126/04/2019 13:51:24
1187 forum posts
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Crossstitch?

Crosssection?

Headmistressship?

Massspectrometer?

Mind you, I had to cheat with t'internet to find 'em, and there were lotsa variants I thought too dodgy... laugh

Phil Stevenson26/04/2019 14:04:34
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Given that there is no definitive authority on language, just traditional bodies who postulate on what is correct, you can make up what you want and call it legitimate. That's how language evolves for better or worse. This lot would say you are "not really" correct Neil. sss

Words with sss are either hyphenated or one s is dropped, vis Mick's examples.

As an aside can anyone guess the (allegedly) only word in the English language with 2 consecutive h's? I hesitate to ask this as someone is bound to know of more than one ....

blowlamp26/04/2019 14:06:14
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Posted by Neil Wyatt on 26/04/2019 13:12:37:

As topslide is a legitimate word... by extension so is crossslide.

Is it the only word in the English language with three 'esses' in a row?

Neil

It'stwowordsisn'tit?

SillyOldDuffer26/04/2019 14:09:39
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Posted by Phil Stevenson on 26/04/2019 14:04:34:.
...
As an aside can anyone guess the (allegedly) only word in the English language with 2 consecutive h's? I hesitate to ask this as someone is bound to know of more than one ....

I know the word but it's withheld due to risk of starting a roughhouse. Oh fishhooks!

not done it yet26/04/2019 15:03:51
3353 forum posts
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Shhhh - keep the noise down!

V8Eng26/04/2019 15:17:36
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Deleted V8.

Edited By V8Eng on 26/04/2019 15:23:36

Mick B126/04/2019 15:59:21
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Posted by Phil Stevenson on 26/04/2019 14:04:34:

Given that there is no definitive authority on language, just traditional bodies who postulate on what is correct, you can make up what you want and call it legitimate. That's how language evolves for better or worse. This lot would say you are "not really" correct Neil. sss

Words with sss are either hyphenated or one s is dropped, vis Mick's examples.

...

But I think even that august body would admit they exist to document, not control, the language - and it's just as well 'cos otherwise every new word would have to submit to their authorisation to join the language.

Language is a living thing, and words are, and mean, whatever the users understand them to. It's understanding what's being referred to that matters. I've sometimes paused to think about 'crossslide' when writing here, and usually decided that it's legit to go ahead, except when I didn't...

Phil Stevenson26/04/2019 15:59:37
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Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 26/04/2019 14:09:39:
Posted by Phil Stevenson on 26/04/2019 14:04:34:.
...
As an aside can anyone guess the (allegedly) only word in the English language with 2 consecutive h's? I hesitate to ask this as someone is bound to know of more than one ....

I know the word but it's withheld due to risk of starting a roughhouse. Oh fishhooks!

I should have seen the worms wriggling in their can! Who am I to say you are right or wrong? I'm doubting the misconception I've been labouring under for years now. My word is ranchhand but I can only find a correct attribution to this spelling in American English. UK English suggests all these words are two words or hyphenated.

Worms back in their can and lid sealed for now.

John Olsen26/04/2019 23:55:43
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So what about a word with three pairs of doubled letters in a row? Can you think of one?

John

blowlamp27/04/2019 00:26:25
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Posted by John Olsen on 26/04/2019 23:55:43:

So what about a word with three pairs of doubled letters in a row? Can you think of one?

John

Closest thing I can think of is Mississippi.

Martin.

Sam Stones27/04/2019 01:30:38
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This might open another tin-of-worms.

Some may have heard/read the word 'and' written consecutively five times in the same sentence.

Sam nerd

Hopper27/04/2019 01:36:04
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Posted by Mick B1 on 26/04/2019 15:59:21:
Posted by Phil Stevenson on 26/04/2019 14:04:34:

Language is a living thing, and words are, and mean, whatever the users understand them to. It's understanding what's being referred to that matters. I've sometimes paused to think about 'crossslide' when writing here, and usually decided that it's legit to go ahead, except when I didn't...

Language is a living thing. But spelling is not language. It's a consciously constructed symbolic system for representing language and thus arbitrarily decided by various authorities such as OED to a large extent. That's why we have so many non-phonetic words, such as phonetic instead of fonetik.

Over time, two words commonly used together tend to be run together, eg awhile, anybody, someone, anytime, backyard, etc and these days even underway. Hence top slide morphing into topslide.

But with crossslide, the triple s is confusing so seems likely to remain as cross slide or cross-slide as is more usual in such cases. Clarity takes precedence over convenience -- in my book anyway!

Geoff Theasby27/04/2019 06:51:59
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At least one club publishes a 'newssheet'.

John Olsen27/04/2019 07:19:58
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The difficulty is that the self constituted authorities are supposedly guided by usage. Usage is of course mostly determined by editors (like Neil?) who in case of doubt, tend to look up their dictionary before wielding the blue pencil. Also teachers tend to insist on dictionary spelling, hence the system has ended up locked into various nonsensical spellings, which can never be changed because those who would like to do so have no say in the system. So we are stuck with absurdities like through, rough, plough and so on, despite the fact that the advantage of our Arabic based letter system is supposed to be that the phonetic nature of spelling means that you can read and pronounce words that you have never previously seen.

Mississippi is not the word I was looking for....

John

Phil Stevenson27/04/2019 07:25:38
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Posted by John Olsen on 27/04/2019 07:19:58:

Mississippi is not the word I was looking for....

John

Bookkeeper is in the middle of the link I posted. Is this the one you're thiking of or is there another?

SillyOldDuffer27/04/2019 09:18:35
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Posted by blowlamp on 27/04/2019 00:26:25:
Posted by John Olsen on 26/04/2019 23:55:43:

So what about a word with three pairs of doubled letters in a row? Can you think of one?

John

Closest thing I can think of is Mississippi.

Martin.

Tried to think of an example unsuccessfully...

surprise

Dave

Mick B127/04/2019 10:15:48
1187 forum posts
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Posted by Hopper on 27/04/2019 01:36:04:
Posted by Mick B1 on 26/04/2019 15:59:21:
Posted by Phil Stevenson on 26/04/2019 14:04:34:

...

But with crossslide, the triple s is confusing so seems likely to remain as cross slide or cross-slide as is more usual in such cases. Clarity takes precedence over convenience -- in my book anyway!

I don't find the triple s confusing; if anything it's clearer as it enables you to deconstruct the word to its components without having to guess which rule from your selected arbitrary authority was used to assemble it...

devil

larry phelan 127/04/2019 12:28:41
501 forum posts
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I seem to remember that someone in "Aliice in wonderland"said of some word,"It means what I want it to mean,neither more nor less"

Seems like a very simple answer ,and suits all situations,something like our "Leaders" like to use.

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