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DIY Bed Gap

Is this a good idea or not?

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Hopper25/04/2019 23:39:16
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Posted by Terry Kirkup on 25/04/2019 14:33:08:.

Most of the changes I am forced to make are due to steering wobble setting in, immediately cured with new discs, not heavy grooving or scoring.

Again it sounds like you are addressing symptoms and not the root cause. Take a look at your steering rack play, ball joints, tie-rod ends, shock absorbers and suspension bushings etc. If those items are in good condition, a slightly out-of-balance partly worn disc will not cause steering wobble.

Some suspension specialist shops will do a free inspection and give you a report on what items are worn and need replacing. Might give you an idea of which way to proceed.

Terry Kirkup26/04/2019 08:30:47
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Very good Richard, but that picture is actually me

Nigel, I love that!

And Hopper, I don't think that quite explains how brand new discs cure the problem as other issues would surely prevent such an instant fix. I did have a duff wheel bearing once on the van but it manifested itself in other ways too, not just steering wobble. Thank you for the input.

This morning I will speak to the lathe and tell it to relax, it won't be going under the knife after all.

Hopper26/04/2019 08:54:35
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Worn out shock absorbers, or worn out shocker mounting rubber bushings, will allow a slightly out of balance disc to bounce up and down a small but critical amount at speed, creating "steering wobble". When you put new in-balance discs on the problem appears to go away -- until the new discs also inevitably become slightly out of balance due to wear, and the "steering wobble" returns.

Wear in your steering rack, linkages, joints and bushings will also all add up to amplify the effect.

That's been my repeated experience.

Edited By Hopper on 26/04/2019 09:02:52

Terry Kirkup26/04/2019 11:07:38
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I'll watch for that, but I've just renewed the wishbones, track rod ends and anti-roll bar bushes on the van so it's as good as it can be for the time being, cheers Hopper.

Hopper26/04/2019 11:51:46
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Sounds like you've delved into it then. Strange one. I guess if you are going to be doing discs for multiple vehicles every year you might as well notch that lathe bed and do it yourself rather than buy new discs all the time. Could be a lot of metal to remove from that inverted V way with an angle grinder though. Maybe a hacksaw cut at each end of the section you wish to remove then chip out the area in between with a hammer and chisel. Then finish it off with an angle grinder for a smooth finish.

Grindstone Cowboy26/04/2019 11:58:28
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Just a thought, but if you were going to remove a section of the ways for a circulr workpiece (i'e' the brake disc), wouldn't some sort of flycutter / boring head held in the chuck and with the tool appropriately orientated make a neat job of it? Some sort of auto-feed to extend the tool each revolution would be required as well. Difficult maybe, but not impossible?

Terry Kirkup26/04/2019 12:10:42
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Thanks for that thought Rob but the weight of opinion on here is massively in favour of me not touching the thing so I'm running scared now. I'm bowing to all this collective experience. And yes, I think your idea would be difficult for me as a newbie, I think I'm a bit of a "twister" rather than "turner" At least the kids pay for their own discs (usually, eventually!).

Hopper26/04/2019 12:25:38
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Ah well if the kids are footing the bill, no point in good old Dad compromising his nice lathe then. New discs all round. Too easy.

Dave Halford26/04/2019 14:59:33
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Posted by Terry Kirkup on 26/04/2019 11:07:38:

I'll watch for that, but I've just renewed the wishbones, track rod ends and anti-roll bar bushes on the van so it's as good as it can be for the time being, cheers Hopper.

And all of these issues would have been found during the MOT smiley

Hopper27/04/2019 01:43:21
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Ah yes, forgot you guys have annual vehicle inspections! Unlike here where vehicle only has to be inspected and certified safe when put up for sale. Consequently cars driving about with wheels flapping in all directions all over the place. (Guilty as charged, yer 'onor.)

not done it yet27/04/2019 08:55:26
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Posted by Hopper on 27/04/2019 01:43:21:

Ah yes, forgot you guys have annual vehicle inspections! Unlike here where vehicle only has to be inspected and certified safe when put up for sale. Consequently cars driving about with wheels flapping in all directions all over the place. (Guilty as charged, yer 'onor.)

The annual test only relates to road-worthiness on the date of the test. Suspension and steering joints/bushes will always have some degree of wear present, soon after being put to use.

Our car just suffered a complete brake failure less than a week before the annual test - with no advisories last year. Total loss of brake fluid because pipes on both circuits failed simultaneously (or very near to!)

A front disc pad became detached from the backing plate on my previous purchase, even though it had done less than 20 miles since the test. Go figure!

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