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Dialect expressions

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Brian Sweeting13/04/2019 23:45:08
354 forum posts
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After working in and moving to Devon came across...

Where you to? As in, where do you come from/live?

Back along. As in, a while ago.

Danny M2Z14/04/2019 01:20:22
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736 forum posts
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Avabluddygoodaymate - Nowurries, she's apples

* Danny M *

Sam Stones14/04/2019 01:40:13
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625 forum posts
210 photos

Would 'Alafotgu!' interpret to mean 'I shall have for to go!' in old and posh English?

Sam smile d

martin perman14/04/2019 08:45:20
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1591 forum posts
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Pretty accurate for me, I was brought up in south london and live in east anglia and thats where it put me.

Martin P

john carruthers14/04/2019 08:53:21
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In the (former) Kent coal field there's a mix of Welsh, Yorkshire, Gerodie and Kent spoken.
In a study by the local uni Aylesham was found to have a distinct dialect of its own.
Alleys are 'jitties'. Lunch taken to work can be 'snap' , 'bait' or 'scran'.

Guy Lamb14/04/2019 10:29:16
55 forum posts

Working on the Clyde in the last century I was often asked " furry boots ?", it took some time to translate this into " from where about do you come ?"

Guy

Nick Clarke 314/04/2019 10:50:49
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288 forum posts
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Having grandparents from Ireland, Scotland, Burton and Hampshire (note all those produce alcohol including English wine!) but growing up in Nottingham and Lincolnshire tea was always 'stewed' to make it while everywhere else it seems to have been 'brewed' and when 'stewed' it was past its best.

Robert Dodds14/04/2019 10:51:50
258 forum posts
29 photos

Thanks Neil,

That got me right to the doorstep!

Bob D

Nick Clarke 314/04/2019 10:54:58
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288 forum posts
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Posted by john carruthers on 14/04/2019 08:53:21:

In the (former) Kent coal field there's a mix of Welsh, Yorkshire, Gerodie and Kent spoken.
In a study by the local uni Aylesham was found to have a distinct dialect of its own.
Alleys are 'jitties'. Lunch taken to work can be 'snap' , 'bait' or 'scran'.

In he mining parts of Nottinghamshire a packed lunch was always 'snap' - perhaps a term miners took around the country with them? And Wakefield's Army Stores had 'snap tins' in their window that used to puzzle me as a child as they didn't seem to snap in any way.

And to add to jitties, alleys and ginnels, when I was growing up they were always 'entries'

Edited By Nick Clarke 3 on 14/04/2019 10:56:28

Mick B114/04/2019 11:14:09
1077 forum posts
60 photos
Posted by Nick Clarke 3 on 14/04/2019 10:50:49:

Having grandparents from Ireland, Scotland, Burton and Hampshire (note all those produce alcohol including English wine!) but growing up in Nottingham and Lincolnshire tea was always 'stewed' to make it while everywhere else it seems to have been 'brewed' and when 'stewed' it was past its best.

There must be variations even within that. When I were in Nottin'am in 70s, yer mashed tea.

Neil Wyatt14/04/2019 12:40:35
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Posted by Nick Clarke 3 on 14/04/2019 10:54:58:

And to add to jitties, alleys and ginnels, when I was growing up they were always 'entries

You need to try the dialect map!

Lanes where I come from.

Neil

IanT14/04/2019 13:05:12
1266 forum posts
128 photos

It managed to pin me down quite well Neil.

Of course, a level of "contamination" tends to occur over many years. I grew up using the term 'Alleyways' but after many years of contact with my mate from Yorkshire - I've started to use some of his expressions - such as 'Snicket'....

IanT

Danny M2Z14/04/2019 15:41:11
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736 forum posts
278 photos

The question on cars puzzled me, Sedan vs saloon, what century we talking about????

If it's got a roof it's a car. If it ain't got a roof it's a sports car. If it ain't got a boot but can carry a few jumbucks in the back with a few Kelpies then it;s a ute. Simples!

Guy Lamb14/04/2019 17:51:38
55 forum posts
Posted by IanT on 14/04/2019 13:05:12:

It managed to pin me down quite well Neil.

Of course, a level of "contamination" tends to occur over many years. I grew up using the term 'Alleyways' but after many years of contact with my mate from Yorkshire - I've started to use some of his expressions - such as 'Snicket'....

IanT

In my part of the world (South Lakes) a back alley is 'Ginnel' or 'Lonnin (g)'.

Guy

bricky14/04/2019 19:06:11
373 forum posts
47 photos

When going to the schoolboys international at wembley we stopped in a park and had our sandwiches.A park keeper was brushing up leaves and he shouted to his mate we, have a gang of Lincolnshire yellow belleys.He must have served in bomber county to know the dialect that we then spoke,sadly it is dissapearing fast like all dialects which are usually spoken amongst manual workers who are nearly extinct.

Frank

martin perman14/04/2019 19:20:28
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1591 forum posts
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Many years ago the University of East Anglia went around the Norfolk and Suffolk counties filming and recording the the people particularly the older population to keep the dialect alive.

Anybody know what a Tater Trap is

Martin P

bricky14/04/2019 22:56:09
373 forum posts
47 photos

Is it a spud clamp.

Frank

martin perman15/04/2019 09:38:15
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1591 forum posts
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Posted by bricky on 14/04/2019 22:56:09:

Is it a spud clamp.

Frank

Its Suffolk for your mouth smiley

Martin P

Rob Rimmer15/04/2019 11:30:04
98 forum posts
1 photos

I'm pretty sure this one is specific to the area of the Fylde coast known as the Moss, but any ideas what a snotgobbler is? I'll post the answer later...

Rob

Alistair Robertson 115/04/2019 16:45:58
45 forum posts
6 photos

An expression that is used in the local north east Scotland and probably a lot further afield is "A sooter's bairn is aye the worst shod" (A shoemaker's children are often in the poorest shoes) Meaning that things to be done at home are often neglected but carried out for someone else! That probably applies the whole world over!

Buchanman.

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