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Danny M2Z04/04/2019 06:43:23
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736 forum posts
278 photos

Using the 'Three Wire' method of accurately measuring threads used to drive me to exasperation until I learned (on a gunsmith's forum) that a dob of grease on the threads makes this task much easier.

It was on this forum (or in a MEW) that I learned the trick of using a bit of 'Blu Tack' or a piece of Plasticine to hold a pin for a simple but quite accurate wobbler for locating a centre pop hole under my mill prior to drilling a hole.

There must be many other such simple hints and tips out there, so how about sharing them around?

Regards * Danny M *

Hopper04/04/2019 07:44:52
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3651 forum posts
72 photos

Grind the tip of a centre drill down to about half its usual length to (mostly) prevent it snapping off in the job.

IanT04/04/2019 09:49:58
1266 forum posts
128 photos

Depth of small holes - drop a suitable drill (shank first) into the hole - and then push down and tighten a 2" toolmakers clamp to it. Pull it out and measure it.

Having cut material close to a scribed line, place a toolmakers clamp (or one at each end) right on the line - then drop it in the vice and clamp up. Assuming the top of your vice jaws are parallel to the cutting action (and they should be) then this will quickly allow the piece to be trimmed to size for most purposes. Remove the clamp(s) before cutting....

Use the front curve of the grinding wheel to sharpen the cutting face of your tool - then hone this face. The concave shape obtained from the wheel will make honing not only easier but also very quick...it's also much safer practice to use the front of the wheel..

You can quickly put good 'squares' on the end of 1/8" regulator rods and similar parts by holding them in a square collet block and using a piece of short round stock approximately half the height of the block to roll/guide a file over the end of the rod. Very quick and simple to set up.

Atlantic rebuild 006.jpg

IanT

SillyOldDuffer04/04/2019 10:42:58
4415 forum posts
957 photos

Three of IanT's ideas are new to me, and the drill depth/clamp trick would have prevented the muddle I got into on Monday! I love this forum.

Thanks, Dave

Danny M2Z05/04/2019 00:11:56
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736 forum posts
278 photos
Posted by IanT on 04/04/2019 09:49:58:

Having cut material close to a scribed line, place a toolmakers clamp (or one at each end) right on the line - then drop it in the vice and clamp up. Assuming the top of your vice jaws are parallel to the cutting action (and they should be) then this will quickly allow the piece to be trimmed to size for most purposes. Remove the clamp(s) before cutting....

I really like this one Ian. It's going to come in handy when I am making model fuel tanks to a precise capacity for team racing purposes as I can adapt it for bending the flanges.

* Danny M *

Alan Waddington 205/04/2019 00:38:32
430 forum posts
86 photos

Don’t wear slippers when welding 👍

XD 35105/04/2019 04:30:35
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1274 forum posts
100 photos
Posted by Alan Waddington 2 on 05/04/2019 00:38:32:

Don’t wear slippers when welding 👍

I only ever wear my safety thongs for welding !

You can use Blu tack to hold the wires as well , just set them up on the thread and pinch them between thumb and forefinger then with the other hand stab a glob of Blu tack on one end of the wires , plasicine also works as does the centre out of a fresh slice of bread rolled up into a ball just make sure you clean and oil the wires after as they will rust - don’t ask how i know this , i just do 😳

If you need a simple gauge to check the angle of the point of a drill bit you are grinding you can use two hex nuts clamped together flat to flat , this gives you a vee with 120deg inc angle - close enough to 118deg to get you by .

I found recently that the WD40 cans that come with the fold out nozzle / tube this cap will fit the old style cans if you drill out the hole in the actuator cap for the can push valve tube to match the larger one on the old style spray cap. when you push the new cap on it will spray a little but push down on the actuator button and it will click into place and stop spraying - i know you get a tube with the old style cans but it is not as long as the fold out one and always seems to fall out and get lost . Still experimenting with this stuff for a cutting fluid when parting off steel - so far I can’t fault it !

If you have an old ipad , iphone or android phone that still works don’t throw it out instead reset it or at least delete as many things off it as you can that you don’t want laying around or could get into the wrong hands and then download a few of the apps that are available for machining and engineering and keep this in the workshop as your little machinists calculator !

Cheap plastic magnifying devices ( magnifying glass) are a godsend if your eyesight isn’t as good as it used to be , i leave a few laying around for reading the markings on drill bits and taps and if you get the ones with a little light built in its even better !

I use magnets to hold the leather cover i use on my lathe bed when machining cast iron but i soon got tired of cleaning the magnets afterwards , i use some little ziplock bags and place the magnet inside , once I’m done i take the magnet out of the bag and the cast iron chips fall off the bag into the bin and a quick wipe cleans the bag for re use . I use a magnet in the handle of my chip brush to stick it to my lathe belt guard as well - works a treat !

AdrianR05/04/2019 08:06:46
229 forum posts
19 photos

I only ever wear my safety thongs for welding !

That is an image I really dont want seared into my imagination.

In the UK thongs (flip flops) are not foot ware, imagine backless buggie smugglers face 7

Mick B105/04/2019 08:52:30
1079 forum posts
60 photos

If you use a vertical slide for milling in the lathe, set it square to the bed by bringing the vice up to the front face of the chuck jaws before you tighten it. Saves a lot of clock-faffing.

IanT05/04/2019 09:28:29
1266 forum posts
128 photos

'Magnets' sparked a thought or two...

Lidl periodically sell magnetic strip 'Toolholders' that are about 18" long and not expensive. The first one I purchased was used as intended and screwed to the side of my bench and holds small hand tools that I don't mind getting slightly magnetised.

The second one (they are easy to sneak into the shopping cart!) was screwed under the shelf over my 'sitting' work bench and hold small jam-pots pinched from NT Cafes (my wife likes Cream Teas) that are popped underneath. They have things like Trefolex (cutting paste) in them - very handy when tapping at the bench.

But the third one never actually got installed anywhere. It's currently still in it's hard plastic wrapper and clinging to the side of my filing cabinet. It gets used to sweep up the floor around my hand shaper (to pick up the bits that didn't drop into my apron). I just need to get one that works for brass chips now...

IanT

Neil Wyatt05/04/2019 09:31:03
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Moderator
16098 forum posts
675 photos
73 articles
Posted by XD 351 on 05/04/2019 04:30:35:

I only ever wear my safety thongs for welding !

crook

Too much information...

IanT05/04/2019 09:36:10
1266 forum posts
128 photos

PS I have thought about screwing it to a wooden strip and adding a handle to make a magnetic broom. But like so many things, I've not quite got around to it yet - and it really doesn't get in the way stuck to the cabinet. I guess it will depend on how long I can still get down to sweep up!

IanT

Ian S C05/04/2019 11:47:02
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7390 forum posts
230 photos

I'v got a couple of telephone magneto magnets on the end of a broom stick, first assembled to pick up nails after a roofing job at our museum at Homebush. Ian S C

homebush logo.jpg

A Smith05/04/2019 12:05:35
28 forum posts
2 photos

Magnets are great for collecting steel swarf -as mentioned above. Like many others, I put the magnet inside a plastic bag that can be turned inside out to remove the bits without them sticking to the magnet.

More of a health & safety thing - wear gloves when MIG welding, you can sunburn the back of your supporting hand if you don't - guess how I know!

Andy

John Reese05/04/2019 17:05:35
746 forum posts
Posted by A Smith on 05/04/2019 12:05:35:

More of a health & safety thing - wear gloves when MIG welding, you can sunburn the back of your supporting hand if you don't - guess how I know!

Andy

And don't wear V-neck T shirts when welding.

XD 35105/04/2019 23:53:36
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1274 forum posts
100 photos
Posted by AdrianR on 05/04/2019 08:06:46:

I only ever wear my safety thongs for welding !

That is an image I really dont want seared into my imagination.

In the UK thongs (flip flops) are not foot ware, imagine backless buggie smugglers face 7

Borat does welding !

I wonder which version (footware or clothing ) came first ?

On a more serious note i was once stick welding a broken car seat frame for a friend and i was starting to chip the slag off and the next thing i hear a crash followed by screaming - he had turned up in bare feet and was standing a few meters away , a piece of slag had landed between his toes and proceeded to burn its way into his foot !

With welding the ray burn ( same as sunburn only it burns deeper ) is only one concern as it also causes skin cancer so proper welding gloves , welding jacket ( leather type ) or heavy cotton overalls ( coveralls ) , trousers ( old pair of jeans are good ) and leather boots ( I wear steel cap boots ) never wear runners ( joggers ) as hot metal or slag will burn straight through them .

one tip with the jeans , coveralls or other trousers is if they are too long and you need to roll the legs up roll them up so excess is on the inside of the trouser leg so it doesn’t create a catch point for sparks and slag to fall into .

ken king, King Design06/04/2019 10:18:17
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125 forum posts
228 photos

To hold up drawings which I need to refer to in the workshop, I've screwed worn-out hacksaw blades to the front edges of shelves, using the convenient end holes, then use a couple of fridge magnets or similar. Ladyshave items include magnetic labels which work well too. Trust me on this.

Roger Williams 206/04/2019 10:33:47
331 forum posts
2 photos

Put a blob of red paint by the zero on the lathe crosslide dial, so easy to return it back without looking at the numbers when screwcutting.

Ian Welford06/04/2019 13:30:41
277 forum posts

woodworkers smocks with the pockets at the back don’t gather as much swarf when milling!

although leather aprons work well for MIG they don’t protect your upper arm just beyond the glove cuff. highly embarrassed by the resultant burn which I spotted when showering later!

Ian

Ian Welford06/04/2019 13:39:35
277 forum posts

Ask at chemists for old tablet pots . Some are exactly the right size internally for magnets from speakers or old microwaves then attach a handle and you have a swarf retriever. If you make it so the magnet can slide in the container you can dump the swarf into the bin by retracting the magnet away from the end face by pulling up the handle. More complicated to describe than to make.

Ian

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