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Ian P22/03/2019 11:08:14
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2093 forum posts
89 photos

In a way a blame myself.

I was the first to reply to a recent question and instead of asking the poster for clarification I gave an answer based on my possibly flawed understanding of what was required. The thread I refer to is about powering a pillar drill from a DC motor.

The actual reason for using the motor is probably because the poster already had it, from a practical point of view it would be a bad choice unless one had no access to mains power. The concept of using a higher speed motor than the one already installed seems bizarre anyway.

The thread has the potential to run and run, drift off into wild blue yonder and ultimately, other than increasing website/forum traffic, serves little or no purpose.

Exchange of ideas is a good thing but the OP has now replied so what is the point of forum members adding more and more off topic and mostly irrelevant information?

I too am guilty of adding comments to threads which probably add to the topic drift and which are of no interest to the original member, but I am far from alone!

I was just going to add to the thread concerned (it now contains several glaring errors/misunderstandings) but I have refrained on a pot calling the kettle black rules.

Ian P

3404622/03/2019 11:18:03
462 forum posts
3 photos

I am one of the members who replied after the OP said thanks for replies.

I only replied as I thought an alternative relatively inexpensive option may be of interest that I have on my 12v motor. I did ensure that my reply was on topic.

Bill

Hopper22/03/2019 11:44:42
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3651 forum posts
72 photos

Often the discussion moves on to other related, and not so related, topics from the original question. Those posting and replying to such posts are obviously interested so why should they not continue the discussion? Often some quite interesting stuff comes to light. (Not sure about this specific thread, motors and electrickery are not my thing, but speaking in general here.) The OP does not have to continue to read on after their initial issue has been addressed, and likewise nobody else has to read it if they are not interested. Hard to see any harm in that.

SillyOldDuffer22/03/2019 11:52:34
4396 forum posts
956 photos

Depends on what you think the forum is for. If it's meant to a Reference Work where a clear question gets a clear answer, then it's badly adrift. To achieve reference quality would require much more discipline and that's not what I want. I have books for that.

I don't think the forum should be at all formal. More like what happens when a group of friends meet in a bar to discuss items of common interest. Personality is allowed. One might be Deadly Serious, another a Clown. Some will have the wrong end of the stick, others incomprehensibly expert. Quite often the bloke who knows the right answer is too shy to speak up until he's had a few. A fair amount of rubbish will be talked, there might be hissy fits, offensive remarks and misunderstandings but on the whole there's much value in the exchange. In my mind forum threads don't have to have ends, rather they can develop as conversations.

On the whole I've mostly found the wandering nature of threads valuable because of the cross-fertilisation, and I think the informality encourages people to join in. But I do sympathise with those irritated by the more extreme ramblings! Sorry when it was my fault!

Dave

Brian Wood22/03/2019 12:00:02
1904 forum posts
37 photos

I wholeheartedly agree with Ian P in his comments; like him I wonder at the sprawl that sometimes occurs well after the actual topic is done and dusted.

Hopper makes a pertinent point that, on occasion, other interesting material [unrelated to the topic] gets added, but because of that it very soon becomes invisible and cannot be traced with ease. I don't know how that can be prevented other than to make a copy of it right away on discovery and keep it somewhere that you can access at will.

Brian

Phil Whitley22/03/2019 12:11:08
839 forum posts
105 photos

A conversation, which is what we have here, is a living animate thing, with as many different opinions and nuggets of information as there are people involved in it. In a good conversation everyone involved should go away that little bit wiser than when they joined it. Every day is a school day. Sometimes the topic wanders, as the core subject is pulled to and fro, and people are reminded of usefull things they learned, and wish to pass on to others. By this method, knowlege advances! Specialisation is for Insects! (R Heinlein)

not done it yet22/03/2019 12:30:28
3008 forum posts
11 photos

It's not only the original poster that might read the thread later. Later, more lucid explanation or alternatives could help those that actually search the threads before they find a need to post a question.

Doing a search often finds things that are obvious - like rotabroach sizes - without posing a question on the forum.

Andy Carruthers22/03/2019 13:39:13
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233 forum posts
23 photos

I have the view that everyone should be welcome to contribute regardless of skill, knowledge and experience - everyone wants to belong to "something" and IMHO it's not for anyone to be excluded

Threads which meander are usually more informative than a straightforward answer. I have learnt an enormous amount perusing various threads which don't immedately answer my specific question but spark further interest

Bazyle22/03/2019 14:08:06
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4582 forum posts
185 photos

I just can't resist adding a comment so that others benefit from my superior intellect. I'm just so generous. cheeky

Andy Carruthers22/03/2019 16:10:58
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233 forum posts
23 photos

I'm glad you said that Bazyle, you are now my go-to guy

Howard Lewis22/03/2019 18:03:08
2035 forum posts
2 photos

Some posts do drift, well off, topic, (Guilty as charged, too! ) But, on or off topic, the info that comes to light is almost always interesting. Only problem is that I can rarely remember which topic it was that contained the info now needed!

Keep the info coming, on topic, if possible; not too far off if possible!

Howard

Words I forgot to post, now included!

Edited By Howard Lewis on 22/03/2019 18:04:39

Roger Williams 222/03/2019 18:51:27
330 forum posts
2 photos

Silly old duffer , +1

Steve King 522/03/2019 21:39:39
47 forum posts
76 photos
Posted by Ian P on 22/03/2019 11:08:14:

In a way a blame myself.

I was the first to reply to a recent question and instead of asking the poster for clarification I gave an answer based on my possibly flawed understanding of what was required. The thread I refer to is about powering a pillar drill from a DC motor.

The actual reason for using the motor is probably because the poster already had it, from a practical point of view it would be a bad choice unless one had no access to mains power. The concept of using a higher speed motor than the one already installed seems bizarre anyway.

The thread has the potential to run and run, drift off into wild blue yonder and ultimately, other than increasing website/forum traffic, serves little or no purpose.

Exchange of ideas is a good thing but the OP has now replied so what is the point of forum members adding more and more off topic and mostly irrelevant information?

I too am guilty of adding comments to threads which probably add to the topic drift and which are of no interest to the original member, but I am far from alone!

I was just going to add to the thread concerned (it now contains several glaring errors/misunderstandings) but I have refrained on a pot calling the kettle black rules.

Ian P

Totally disagree

As somebody new to the hobby of metalworking lathe turning and general workshop engineering I have learnt lots from this post.

Robin Graham22/03/2019 22:50:51
545 forum posts
124 photos

Having no background in mechanical engineering I think I would have given up metal mangling a long time ago if it wasn't for this forum. I've sometimes asked questions which have been answered in the first few replies, but have then meandered on for several pages. I actually like it when then happens because my question has sparked a discussion, so it's not only me who's interested. I usually glean some unlooked for knowledge as well.

When I ask a question on a Linux forum which I use, I get instructions from a guru to execute a command and post the output. I do that and I'm instructed to execute another command. Whoo-hoo, problem solved, then I have to tick a box which effectively closes the topic - but I didn't learn anything.

Carry on wittering is what I say!

Robin

blowlamp22/03/2019 23:21:38
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1193 forum posts
82 photos

Remember to set your onions 2 to 4 inches apart, in rows 10 to 12 inches apart.

Martin

Michael Gilligan22/03/2019 23:27:20
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13235 forum posts
578 photos
Posted by blowlamp on 22/03/2019 23:21:38:

Remember to set your onions 2 to 4 inches apart, in rows 10 to 12 inches apart.

.

dont know Interesting advice

Theory would suggest that this might result in a non-circular cross-section.

MichaelG.

Robin Graham23/03/2019 00:03:09
545 forum posts
124 photos
Posted by blowlamp on 22/03/2019 23:21:38:

Remember to set your onions 2 to 4 inches apart, in rows 10 to 12 inches apart.

 

Martin

Would that be for small, medium, or large onions? You need to be more specific Martin.

  It always worries me when a recipe specifies something like two medium onions. I reckon the gravitational force on a medium onion should be about 1 Newton, but I may be wrong.

Robin

Edited By Robin Graham on 23/03/2019 00:14:09

Andy Carruthers23/03/2019 03:37:45
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233 forum posts
23 photos

Can anyone explain why we need two clairvoyant onions? does the recipe also include eye of bat?

I'll get my cloak...

Edited By Andy Carruthers on 23/03/2019 03:38:27

Mick B123/03/2019 06:28:57
1069 forum posts
59 photos
Posted by Roger Williams 2 on 22/03/2019 18:51:27:

Silly old duffer , +1

And another. Makes me wonder how many interesting threads I've missed because the first subject didn't twang my tines...

Joseph Noci 123/03/2019 06:35:16
483 forum posts
819 photos

Ian P : I too am guilty of adding comments to threads which probably add to the topic drift and which are of no interest to the original member, but I am far from alone!

Hopper: Often the discussion moves on to other related, and not so related, topics from the original question. Those posting and replying to such posts are obviously interested so why should they not continue the discussion?

If the Post originator has had his question answered to some sort of usefulness, or considers advise given to have settled his mind, then by all means drift away...But , if not, it is rather selfish to just take the topic off in an irrelevant direction, just because it 'stimulates' the rest of the folk, while ignoring the poor chap who asked the question in the first place

SOD: Depends on what you think the forum is for. If it's meant to a Reference Work where a clear question gets a clear answer, then it's badly adrift. To achieve reference quality would require much more discipline and that's not what I want. I have books for that.

I would not think advice as to the use of a motor on a drill press to be reference work - the fellow was merely asking...

I don't think the forum should be at all formal. More like what happens when a group of friends meet in a bar to discuss items of common interest. Personality is allowed. One might be Deadly Serious, another a Clown. Some will have the wrong end of the stick, others incomprehensibly expert. Quite often the bloke who knows the right answer is too shy to speak up until he's had a few. A fair amount of rubbish will be talked, there might be hissy fits, offensive remarks and misunderstandings but on the whole there's much value in the exchange. In my mind forum threads don't have to have ends, rather they can develop as conversations.

And while the rest of the group gets sloshed, the chap who entered with a request for knowledge leaves the pub...

Brian Wood: Hopper makes a pertinent point that, on occasion, other interesting material [unrelated to the topic] gets added, but because of that it very soon becomes invisible and cannot be traced with ease.

Howard Lewis: Some posts do drift, well off, topic, (Guilty as charged, too! ) But, on or off topic, the info that comes to light is almost always interesting. Only problem is that I can rarely remember which topic it was that contained the info now needed!

Robin Graham: Having no background in mechanical engineering I think I would have given up metal mangling a long time ago if it wasn't for this forum. I've sometimes asked questions which have been answered in the first few replies, but have then meandered on for several pages. I actually like it when then happens because my question has sparked a discussion, so it's not only me who's interested. I usually glean some unlooked for knowledge as well.

If the question has been answered, then you no longer have the podium, so anything goes..I guess..But I don't consider is remotely good manners to kick the chap off the podium, with his query still hanging, while you pursue your own agenda - if you want to do that, start your own driftable topic..

When I ask a question on a Linux forum which I use, I get instructions from a guru to execute a command and post the output. I do that and I'm instructed to execute another command. Whoo-hoo, problem solved, then I have to tick a box which effectively closes the topic - but I didn't learn anything.

You did not learn because you chose not to - you asked a question how to fix the problem and got the good answer. If you wanted to know 'why' then you could ask more, or better still, follow SOD's advice and get some reference material...There is no excuse for not using your brain..

If someone asks how to thread on the lathe, many will chip in with the ideal way, other ways, right and wrong ways, from the front, from the back, etc, etc - The question will have been answered, but the true newbie will be NONE THE WISER till he tries, makes mistakes and LEARNS. And no doubt many will propose that he review some reference material, such as the various lathe screwcutting books and booklets, etc. That's how you learn..

I for one do not appreciate excessive topic drift while my query remains in the cold..

My 1 Namibian Dollar's worth..

​​​​​​​Now all have your go at me...

Joe

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