By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale May 23

What is a good quality lathe paint

To spray up the lathe after being sand blasted

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Grant Allen 119/03/2019 15:49:43
48 forum posts
5 photos

I'm looking for a good make brand of paint for repainting my myford after being sand blasted. Would I also require a good etch primer any advice gratefully received.

David George 119/03/2019 16:33:50
avatar
787 forum posts
282 photos

Hi Grant The original finish on the Myford was done by filling the castings and smoothing with filler and repeated to look smooth. The filler is quite thick to look corect and if you sandblast the castings you will have to repeat this to get same Finnish. I would look at sanding and filling any damage and spraying on top of original filler.

David

Andrew Tinsley19/03/2019 16:36:27
881 forum posts

You would not believe how thick the filler can be! I followed David's advice and then used Paragon paint. Take a look at their web site it is full of good advice.

Andrew

Pete Rimmer19/03/2019 16:36:40
312 forum posts
7 photos

I had my lathe cabinet sand blasted, but no other part of the lathe. Hopefully you understand what bits absolutely MUST be protected Grant.

Apart from that any good enamel paint will do the job. I use Arcforce enamel off ebay along with their grey zinc phosphate primer.

Grant Allen 119/03/2019 17:00:15
48 forum posts
5 photos

I thought that it would of had filler, I assume its car body filler ? I know that any machine face is precious is there anything else I should watch out for. I will certainly be looking at those paint suppliers you have all mentioned.

Stueeee19/03/2019 17:26:17
avatar
20 forum posts

+1 for Arc force paint. I use Arc Force paint on my machines too. They will do any BS or RAL colour. I've recently painted this newish to me lathe as part of the restoration process. This is BS Dark Admiralty Grey.

It is basically a spray paint but does brush on OK for smaller stuff. Available here -usual disclaimer.

**LINK**

Plasma19/03/2019 18:12:14
246 forum posts
34 photos

To make the castings look good lots of P38 body filler and elbow grease is required.

It's more like dealing with car bodywork than engineering machinery.

I would not grit blast anything, preferring thinners and flap wheel grinding discs to strip away the old finish. Blasting in my opinion is just not worth the effort and risk of something getting damaged either in transit or in cleaning.

I use Teamac plant and machinery enamel paint on my machines but there's no reason the other enamels mentioned here won't compare just as well.

Grant Allen 119/03/2019 18:25:50
48 forum posts
5 photos

From your advice on here I wont be blasting it I knew it would take it back to metal but looking at the amount of filling to get that smooth finish I'm just going to flap wheel it. Looking at the enamels it brings back memories of the tractor we had and the new Hudson autocycle I restored.

Joseph Noci 119/03/2019 19:20:41
476 forum posts
817 photos

Interesting that you folk recommend enamel paint - in our hemisphere, enamel paint is a generic name for the type of paint used in household applications - gloss and semi-gloss for doors, door frames, exterior facia boards, etc. This tends to be a turpentine solvent based paint and does certainly not stand up to machine lubrication oils and water soluble coolant, etc. Strictly utilitarian , white goods, and never on machines! So, your enamel must be something else..

My machines, generally 'green' - use a 2 part acid etch primer, and a two part epoxy base paint. Tough as nails, withstands all oils, turpentines, thinners, etc, and very scratch resistant.

Joe

side-1.jpg

front1058.jpg

Grant Allen 119/03/2019 19:37:31
48 forum posts
5 photos

It had crossed my mind, acid etch primer brilliant stuff had good results in the past.

Mike Crossfield19/03/2019 20:00:38
186 forum posts
10 photos

Tractol enamel is superb for machinery. Tough as old boots. High pigment content and slow drying, so you can get a good finish using brush application. Spaying even better. Available in a huge range of colours. Ferguson grey is a good match for Myford grey. Smith and Allen is a very helpful UK stockist.

Rockingdodge19/03/2019 21:22:24
avatar
83 forum posts
10 photos

+1 for Tractol, used it to restore my Denham Junior and Record vice.

Vic19/03/2019 22:16:22
2043 forum posts
10 photos

I've used ready mixed filler on metal before.

**LINK**

then a couple of coats of Primer Filler then top coat.

Peter F19/03/2019 23:47:25
98 forum posts
23 photos

I'd use a 2k Acrylic gloss top coat automotive paint on top of 2k filler primer, this gives a very tough gloss top coat that looks like powder coating.

Peter F19/03/2019 23:49:36
98 forum posts
23 photos

Joseph Noci, what Lathe is that in your photo?

Chris Evans 620/03/2019 07:49:46
1413 forum posts

Stueee, I dream of owning a DSG

Back to original post. Plus 1 for Tractol paint.

Russ B20/03/2019 08:11:45
536 forum posts
20 photos

I used a company on ebay called Paints4trade, very knowledgeable, they can make anything you want. You can also get Toluene and other useful solvents for cleaning really stubborn grease/grime stains.

The enamel paint I bought was specifically for plant and machinery and was Xylene based. Just go easy on the Xylene and Toluene as they are a bit toxic, affects the nervous systems etc. Well ventilated area needed!

Tractol is a Xylene based enamel paint too.

 

Edited By Russ B on 20/03/2019 08:13:15

David Standing 120/03/2019 09:08:44
1206 forum posts
45 photos
Posted by Peter F on 19/03/2019 23:49:36:

Joseph Noci, what Lathe is that in your photo?

Maximat V10-P

SillyOldDuffer20/03/2019 11:17:20
4291 forum posts
911 photos
Posted by Joseph Noci 1 on 19/03/2019 19:20:41:

Interesting that you folk recommend enamel paint - in our hemisphere, enamel paint is a generic name for the type of paint used in household applications - gloss and semi-gloss for doors, door frames, exterior facia boards, etc. This tends to be a turpentine solvent based paint and does certainly not stand up to machine lubrication oils and water soluble coolant, etc. Strictly utilitarian , white goods, and never on machines! So, your enamel must be something else..

...

'Enamel' is another of those words that's bent it's meaning over time and space. Originally 'enamel' was a baked on coating, heatproof, very hard and durable, applied to domestic ovens and cast-iron baths etc. Usually but not necessarily white. Expensive, can be done on a small scale, but really needs a largish kiln. Still found on posh cookware.

Later 'enamel' came to include 'hard wearing paints that look like real enamel', or, less desirably, 'any soft paint that looks a bit like real enamel'. Usually in the UK the hard wearing definition is what's meant, but what's available ranges between high-performance 2-part paints, and cheaper, less tough, mixtures. It is also possible to buy 'enamel' paints that aren't hard-wearing at all, making Grant's question a good one.

Dave

David Standing 120/03/2019 11:46:10
1206 forum posts
45 photos
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 20/03/2019 11:17:20:
Posted by Joseph Noci 1 on 19/03/2019 19:20:41:

Interesting that you folk recommend enamel paint - in our hemisphere, enamel paint is a generic name for the type of paint used in household applications - gloss and semi-gloss for doors, door frames, exterior facia boards, etc. This tends to be a turpentine solvent based paint and does certainly not stand up to machine lubrication oils and water soluble coolant, etc. Strictly utilitarian , white goods, and never on machines! So, your enamel must be something else..

...

'Enamel' is another of those words that's bent it's meaning over time and space. Originally 'enamel' was a baked on coating, heatproof, very hard and durable, applied to domestic ovens and cast-iron baths etc. Usually but not necessarily white. Expensive, can be done on a small scale, but really needs a largish kiln. Still found on posh cookware.

Later 'enamel' came to include 'hard wearing paints that look like real enamel', or, less desirably, 'any soft paint that looks a bit like real enamel'. Usually in the UK the hard wearing definition is what's meant, but what's available ranges between high-performance 2-part paints, and cheaper, less tough, mixtures. It is also possible to buy 'enamel' paints that aren't hard-wearing at all, making Grant's question a good one.

Dave

Dave, I would have to put my pedant hat on, and challenge you on that.

The first type you refer to has traditionally been referred to as stove enamelling. It still very much exists, and sits side by side with other (non baked) enamels.

Whilst I agree that the second is a catch all encompassing many types of 'enamel', it is still true that there is a separation, as there always has been, between baked stove enamel, and air drying (all the others).

You haven't even mentioned powder coating, which probably sits uncomfortably between the other two categories wink

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Eccentric July 5 2018
TRANSWAVE Converters
Warco
Eccentric Engineering
Ausee.com.au
ChesterUK
Allendale Electronics
emcomachinetools
Sarik
Subscription Offer

Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest