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Hardinge HLV-H

Metric thread cutting

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Adam Harris19/03/2019 11:50:51
499 forum posts
26 photos

I was wondering if anyone has calculated a minimum number of simple change gears required to get approximations for a range off mm pitches say M4 - M14 from the imperial gearbox of the Hardinge HLV-H, along the same lines as the John Stevenson (?) method for the Myford. Many Hardinge users are inclined to switch out the set of change gears for Myford gears that are much cheaper (and more available) than Hardinge gears, but even so the perfect set as determined by the manual requires a total of 11 change gears including 77T , 66T and 56T which three are not easily available from Myford. Not too difficult to cut oneself but even so am curious if there is a better simpler Myford-style solution 

Edited By Adam Harris on 19/03/2019 11:52:27

Edited By Adam Harris on 19/03/2019 11:57:11

Edited By Adam Harris on 19/03/2019 11:58:39

Adam Harris19/03/2019 12:20:18
499 forum posts
26 photos

Maybe a better question is what is the formula required to make all the calculations from which to select the best approximations and what information is needed to feed into that formula? A problem is that the Hardinge gearbox is not driven by external gears in order to generate normal imperial pitches, but since I know the perfect change gear settings for a given metric pitch generated, presumably with the correct formula one can easily work backwards from this.....

Edited By Adam Harris on 19/03/2019 12:26:22

Bikepete19/03/2019 13:30:06
235 forum posts
34 photos

Yup here you go, complete with charts to print out etc.

**LINK**

Read the whole thread, as it goes through a few different variations. I bring up using Myford gears at the bottom of the first page. All works perfectly and have cut many a thread with this set-up (on a narrow bed HLV-BK, but pretty sure HLV-H is the same). Uses the original (imperial) banjo so all you need is the Myford changewheels.

Adam Harris19/03/2019 14:47:03
499 forum posts
26 photos

Pete that is just exactly what I was looking for! Thank you very much indeed. It takes for the common metric range M5-M14 total only 8 Myford gears (as opposed to 11), means I only have to make up 1 myself (the 47T) as opposed to 3, only then pin it to the 37T, and I avoid the cost of the 127T which is £26.50 from RDG (actually rather cheap).

Does the compound 37T/47T stay the same position throughout for all those threads (37T on 2nd inside position, 47T on 1st outer position)?

Bikepete19/03/2019 15:12:11
235 forum posts
34 photos

Glad it hit the spot . But all kudos should go to the original poster in that thread - very clever chap.

IIRC I had no need to pin the 37-47, as on mine one of the original Hardinge banjo studs included a sleeve with long key onto which I could mount both gears rigidly together. Of course what you have on yours may differ.

Pretty sure I bought my 47 T gear - might be worth a hunt around for sellers unless you really fancy making it.

On the second question about the 37/47 - I think that's the case but am away from my workshop just now so can't get a visual reminder. Pretty sure I had the same question and scribbled something about it on the threading chart which I printed out to make it completely clear (e.g. which way round the 37/47 goes) - far too easy to forget these details if time elapses between set-ups... but it's easy enough to experiment and get it clear once you have the gears.

You'll also have spotted the photo of the set-up for 2 mm pitch on the second page of that thread...

Adam Harris19/03/2019 15:22:21
499 forum posts
26 photos

I'm guessing the composite position on the basis that in the original Hardinge change gears the big 127T goes on the 1st outer and its smaller companion takes the 2nd inner position. My Hardinge is devoid of sleeve or banjo!

Yes in that photo the bigger does go on the outer. Does the compound always stay in that orientation?

Edited By Adam Harris on 19/03/2019 15:22:57

Edited By Adam Harris on 19/03/2019 15:25:30

stuart froud08/01/2021 08:59:36
2 forum posts

Hello to all.

We are based in Billingshurst and are trying to find someone who can refurb/repair our two Hardinge hlv-h lathes.

In the past (Years ago) we used ZMT, but it appears they no longer operate.

I just thought on the off chance someone in this forum may be able to assist?

Thomas Keating Limited

Thank you.

Pete Rimmer08/01/2021 19:35:03
1053 forum posts
69 photos

What sort of work needs doing to the machines Stuart, and over what time frame?

Edited By Pete Rimmer on 08/01/2021 19:35:11

stuart froud15/01/2021 14:24:03
2 forum posts

We have 2 Hardinge Super Precision manual lathes:

S/N KL1-2124

S/N HLV-H249

With the follow issues:

  • Feed not working
  • Screw cutting feed selection knob broken
  • Top slide locking cam shaft broken
  • General service required

Looking to find someone 'handy' as recently understand from Hardinge in Europe that they do not have any one in the UK, plus parts/spares a bit limited.

Ideally the sooner the better

Many thanks.

Howard Lewis15/01/2021 14:44:39
5241 forum posts
13 photos

You may not find just one person who could / would carryout all the repairs on your lathes, but on this Forum there will be more than sufficient expertise to solve the problems on each machine, given time.

Especially now that the country is in lockdown.

Howard

Pete Rimmer15/01/2021 14:53:32
1053 forum posts
69 photos
Posted by stuart froud on 15/01/2021 14:24:03:

We have 2 Hardinge Super Precision manual lathes:

S/N KL1-2124

S/N HLV-H249

With the follow issues:

  • Feed not working
  • Screw cutting feed selection knob broken
  • Top slide locking cam shaft broken
  • General service required

Looking to find someone 'handy' as recently understand from Hardinge in Europe that they do not have any one in the UK, plus parts/spares a bit limited.

Ideally the sooner the better

Many thanks.

The top slide locking cam breaks because the top slide base is prone to becoming bowed which causes unwanted rotation of the slide under load so it requires more and more clamping until the cam bolt shears. Ask your operator if this has been the case? This will require scraping of the top slide, and a new cam bolt made, as I have done on mine.

Feed not working I take it is the electrical feed to the carriage from the tailstock control? That would need diagnosing as would the feed selection knob (i.e. is it just the knob or the selector behind). Neither should pose too much of a problem to a competent person.

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