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Cold Blue

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Chris Short 117/03/2019 15:20:50
6 forum posts

i would like to cold blue some of the workshop tools I have made

What make of solution do you recommend from your own experience and where can I get it from

thanks

Mick B117/03/2019 15:39:05
1241 forum posts
70 photos

The best I found was G96 gun bluing paste. Wash everything in very hot detergent water and apply the paste whilst metal's still hot to the touch. Small paintbrush works quite well. Wash off thoroughly and oil up lightly. Wear rubber gloves throughout.

There's also KoldBlak. I found that worked, but less well, and more faffing.

 

Edited By Mick B1 on 17/03/2019 15:39:45

Plasma17/03/2019 16:55:07
338 forum posts
41 photos

I have a few old tools that have a really decorative pattern of blueing.

They look like the marbled paper you see in expensive books.

I've often wondered how that was done as it looks so effective.

AdrianR17/03/2019 17:11:45
272 forum posts
20 photos

Have you read the wiki page It describes several methods, one, Colour Case Hardening sounds like it could be your marbled paper effect.

Lainchy18/11/2019 23:01:02
avatar
157 forum posts
40 photos

Just found this thread... I was interested myself in some bluing, mainly for small tools I make.

...found Abbey Blu Gel on eBay, less than £10 which is what I wanted to spend. I'm not saying it's the answer to all bluing... but for small items, it worked for me.

Clean the part well with 99% IPA... coat, wait, rinse. Repeat 3 times. Works well and is dead easy.

20191118_224131.jpg

Michael Gilligan19/11/2019 07:24:05
avatar
14244 forum posts
627 photos
Posted by Lainchy on 18/11/2019 23:01:02:

Just found this thread... I was interested myself in some bluing, mainly for small tools I make.

...found Abbey Blu Gel on eBay, less than £10 which is what I wanted to spend. I'm not saying it's the answer to all bluing... but for small items, it worked for me.

Clean the part well with 99% IPA... coat, wait, rinse. Repeat 3 times. Works well and is dead easy.

.

That sounds very promising ... Thanks for the reference.

I realise that this is a rather subjective question, but:

How durable would you say it is ?

MichaelG.

Mick B119/11/2019 08:57:47
1241 forum posts
70 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 19/11/2019 07:24:05:
Posted by Lainchy on 18/11/2019 23:01:02:

Just found this thread... I was interested myself in some bluing, mainly for small tools I make.

...found Abbey Blu Gel on eBay, less than £10 which is what I wanted to spend. I'm not saying it's the answer to all bluing... but for small items, it worked for me.

Clean the part well with 99% IPA... coat, wait, rinse. Repeat 3 times. Works well and is dead easy.

.

That sounds very promising ... Thanks for the reference.

I realise that this is a rather subjective question, but:

How durable would you say it is ?

MichaelG.

I think that depends to a considerable extent on conditions. In a dryish place with reasonably stable temperatures and an occasional wipe from an oily rag, it should be good if the layer was sound in the first place.

If you look at the cannon in my album, that was made in 2002 and blued with G96 paste after unsatisfactory results with some liquid cold blues. The photo dates from 2005, and it looks the same today.

Lainchy19/11/2019 09:26:47
avatar
157 forum posts
40 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 19/11/2019 07:24:05:
Posted by Lainchy on 18/11/2019 23:01:02:

Just found this thread... I was interested myself in some bluing, mainly for small tools I make.

...found Abbey Blu Gel on eBay, less than £10 which is what I wanted to spend. I'm not saying it's the answer to all bluing... but for small items, it worked for me.

Clean the part well with 99% IPA... coat, wait, rinse. Repeat 3 times. Works well and is dead easy.

.

That sounds very promising ... Thanks for the reference.

I realise that this is a rather subjective question, but:

How durable would you say it is ?

MichaelG.

Not sure Michael tbh, it's mainly aesthetic for me, and I guess a lot would depend on the surface hardness. The piece I did as a test isn't hardened... it's just a die guide for a tail stock chuck, but it has finished nice. I'm expecting it to provide "some" rust resistance, but only combined with a thin covering of oil. I think I paid £8.55, so at this price, it was worth a shot (pardon the pun)

Michael Gilligan19/11/2019 09:34:08
avatar
14244 forum posts
627 photos

Thanks for that, Lainchy ... I’ve already ordered some, anyway.

MichaelG.

KEITH BEAUMONT19/11/2019 10:18:20
62 forum posts
15 photos

Hi Plama,

That rainbow marbled finish was obtained by immersing in a molten Sodium Cyanide bath at a high temperature for a few minutes and then a rapid quench in water. This caused a bang and sprayed water all over the place.. The Cyanide was in the size and shape of pidgeon eggs before being molten. I think the process also gave some case hardening to the item.. When I was an apprentice Patternmaker at Drummond Bros, the hardening shop was opposite ours and had the only running water to wash hands etc, for several hundred yards, so we were in there frequently.. I bet the Cyanide process would turn the hair grey of a modern H&S person.

Keith

Lainchy19/11/2019 10:19:33
avatar
157 forum posts
40 photos

No probs Michael.

If you don't have 99% IPA and some protective gloves... source them too. I've seen some youtube videos online, and they all say that it's vitally important that it's 100% degreased. I did the following....

degrease,

apply with a tissue (or brush which is probably easier) and wait 15 seconds or so

rinse (remember that your sink might be metal! - although I think this risk is low)

dry

repeat twice more starting degrease again, so three coats in all, then oil.

Lainchy19/11/2019 10:31:46
avatar
157 forum posts
40 photos

... Great info by the way Keith! I sometimes wonder if H&S is a little over the top, but in the case of that.... I'm sure it would be welcomed!

Stueeee19/11/2019 19:20:34
avatar
31 forum posts

I've had good results using this stuff Weblink It's also available in a bottle, but I've found that the product in a tube keeps better, I've had the same tube for several years now, still works OK for blueing the odd thumbscrew etc.

Neil Wyatt19/11/2019 19:20:40
avatar
Moderator
16740 forum posts
689 photos
76 articles

I used to have some Jenolite(?) Koldblak/Koolblak(?) gel in a tube, it worked well on steel and less well on brass. I used it to black the brass chanins for my crane and found I had to leave the chain to soak for several hours, but they still look black.

Neil

Hollowpoint19/11/2019 21:09:47
240 forum posts
28 photos

I agree with mick. I used to be well into my shooting and g96 is the best, and I've tried plenty. Parts need to be spotless before blueing. Washing with ordinary Wasing up liquid and warm water works for me. Then oil or rub over with renaissance wax.

Vic19/11/2019 22:16:57
2330 forum posts
12 photos

I’ve used Gun Blue liquids like Birchwood Casey with some success on small parts.

Kevin Murrell20/11/2019 07:58:20
31 forum posts
2 photos

I've had repeated good results from the kit I bought from Caswell. Notes and pictures here:

**LINK**

Kevin

Alan Johnson 720/11/2019 13:44:16
78 forum posts
13 photos

Virgin Flaxseed Oil (Linseed Oil) gives a nice durable finish to workshop tools. Clean the tools, rub it on, and bake in a domestic oven. No bad smells either!

Michael Gilligan20/11/2019 15:49:33
avatar
14244 forum posts
627 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 19/11/2019 09:34:08:

Thanks for that, Lainchy ... I’ve already ordered some, anyway.

.

Ordered yesterday, at a very reasonable price ... and arrived this morning.

Fantastic service from: **LINK**

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Abbey-Blu-Gel-Blueing-Gun-Metal-Barrel-Blue-Liquid-Shotgun-Rifle-Airgun-75gm/262286134180

MichaelG.

ega20/11/2019 16:17:20
1335 forum posts
109 photos
Posted by Alan Johnson 7 on 20/11/2019 13:44:16:

Virgin Flaxseed Oil (Linseed Oil) gives a nice durable finish to workshop tools. Clean the tools, rub it on, and bake in a domestic oven. No bad smells either!

Is that the same as raw as opposed to boiled linseed?

An attractive idea as long as the workpiece is not held together with Loctite.

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