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What is this grinder?

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choochoo_baloo16/03/2019 00:13:17
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177 forum posts
25 photos

I was just browsing tool grinders, and came across this design of what looks like a lathe tool grinder. Described as a Ferret Trim Tool. [It's clearly well made].

grinder.jpg

Bill Davies 216/03/2019 00:30:35
79 forum posts
10 photos

I'd agree with the description as a lathe tool grinder. Many years ago, working on a tool grinding section, I used similar grinders for sharpening brazed carbide lathe tools, and one grinder had a diamond wheel, for finishing the tool. The trough is for water, although people seem to deprecate its use now. We didn't allow the work to get too hot before cooling in the water just to keep them cool enough to hold. No gloves were used for holding the tool. I think we had double-ended versions, and although hard to judge, the ones I used was larger (8 inch wheel?).

duncan webster16/03/2019 00:31:29
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2016 forum posts
30 photos

It's exactly what it says it is, a sort of industrial Worden grinder. Most of them are 3 phase, and they are very heavy. I had one which I converted to single phase but it was too heavy to keep moving around. The original size wheels are as easily available as rocking horse droppings, but I've no doubt you could alter the nose arrangement.

Edited By duncan webster on 16/03/2019 00:31:43

Michael Gilligan16/03/2019 07:05:04
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12924 forum posts
555 photos
Posted by duncan webster on 16/03/2019 00:31:29:

It's exactly what it says it is ...

.

... a tool for trimming ferrets surprise

David George 116/03/2019 07:14:38
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753 forum posts
261 photos

Every factory I have worked on had one of these in the turning section for sharpening carbide tools and tips. Diamond wheel and cutting oil in tray, wish I had one now.

David

Andrew Johnston16/03/2019 07:26:29
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4554 forum posts
521 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 16/03/2019 07:05:04:

... a tool for trimming ferrets

I should think so too; you wouldn't want an untrimmed ferret down your trousers.

Andrew

Speedy Builder516/03/2019 07:28:54
1715 forum posts
118 photos

Interesting that there is a reversing switch on it. Is that so that left handed workers can use the other side of the wheel ??

Clive India16/03/2019 09:19:49
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170 forum posts
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 16/03/2019 07:05:04:
Posted by duncan webster on 16/03/2019 00:31:29:

It's exactly what it says it is ...

.... a tool for trimming ferrets surprise

Yes Michael, all ferrets need trimming occasionally.
It could take a while to ferret out one of these tools though.

Perhaps you would want to get into "hobs," "Jills," "gibs" and "sprites" and a "business"

Back to the prologue...

Bazyle16/03/2019 09:48:12
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4484 forum posts
184 photos

Note that it does not have a precision adjustment for angle, no scale, no machined edges to the table, no guide groove in the table. Hence it is for roughing everyday tools from the days when people understood that you didn't need a multi-axis complex table just to grind a basic HSS tool. The precision tools eg for screwcutting would have come from the toolroom.

Funny how everyone thinks they can freehand sharpen a drill or wood chisel (which they can't with anything but bodgers accuracy) but think they need a super doper grinding rest for a left hand knife tool.

fishy-steve16/03/2019 09:58:19
108 forum posts
30 photos
Posted by Speedy Builder5 on 16/03/2019 07:28:54:

Interesting that there is a reversing switch on it. Is that so that left handed workers can use the other side of the wheel ??

I found that side of the wheel very useful for doing the top rake of a right handed tool. That way you can easily keep an eye on the cutting edge and not catch the tool or your fingers on the other side of the wheel.

Using the reversing switch meant the grindng forces are down as are the sparks.

Steve.

Edited By fishy-steve on 16/03/2019 09:59:48

Vic16/03/2019 10:04:31
2016 forum posts
10 photos

These seem to be commonly available in the US.

**LINK**

its a shame UK tool vendors aren’t interested in them.

robjon4416/03/2019 10:17:10
98 forum posts

Hi all, or perchance when grinding the widely prevalent brazed tip tools back in the day all such machines had reversing switches, to follow the perceived wisdom of grinding down from the cutting edge, in the case of a right hand turning tool grind the top face first on the left hand side of the wheel, reverse rotation & touch up front, side & tip radius on the right hand side of the wheel, if tool required more than a lick then the same applies when tidying up any damage on a green grit wheel, I will leave you to figure out where your fingers would be positioned otherwise.

With regard to the trimming of ferrets, in my limited experience their claws may indeed need a clip from time to time however their formidable teeth may present more of a problem, that being said they are as cute & playful a natural born killer as you will meet.

Cheers robjon44

mechman4816/03/2019 11:18:00
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2329 forum posts
375 photos

Back when I taught apprentices the training centre machine section had one similar for lathe tool grinding but, re Bazyle's comment, ours was two sided, had guide grooves, machined edges, precision angle scale. It was a beast with a cast iron base, 3 ph. Just can't recall the maker, maybe look through Lathes.co.uk for picture.

George.

mechman4816/03/2019 11:31:21
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2329 forum posts
375 photos

Found it... Mk1 Abwood... First picture

**LINK**

George.

Clive Foster16/03/2019 12:16:43
1664 forum posts
46 photos

Further to what Bazyle says about angle scales. Normally you'd set the table angle by reference to the existing tool angles or, possibly, a simple sheet angle reference for something special. Once you have the knack its far quicker to loosen the handle, adjust the table so the tool sits properly against the wheel and lock up again than it is to read a scale. Especially as said scale is probably covered in guiding dust, hidden under the table and, if its one of the import style linked to by Vic, not super accurate in the first place.

Generally when it comes to lathe tools sharp beats dead to book angles all the time except for special cases like screwcutting. If I had one I'd probably sort out some sort of rotating cam stop for the three or four table angles I might need.

As the name suggests its designed as a trimming tool to re-sharpen worn tools or sharpen tooling already ground to shape, either in the toolroom or purchased welded tip and brazed carbide on a shank style. Which were once readily available rough ground in a much wider range of tip shapes than can be found today. Georges' Abwood is a toolroom beast. Not shop floor.

Clive.

Edited By Clive Foster on 16/03/2019 12:17:16

not done it yet16/03/2019 13:45:07
2811 forum posts
11 photos

A quick perusal of the popular selling forum shows three such items for sale. So no real mystery about them.

Pete White16/03/2019 14:08:27
50 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 16/03/2019 13:45:07:

A quick perusal of the popular selling forum shows three such items for sale. So no real mystery about them.

Good luck to the sellers at those prices. I personally could think of quite a few better ways of spending my "workshop cash "

Pete

Clive Foster16/03/2019 14:28:23
1664 forum posts
46 photos

Sticker shock indeed. If they really go for that maybe ignoring one for £75 plus about £25 worth of petrol to pick it up about three years back was a mistake. But I've got a couple or three nice flange mount motors of suitable size that owe me nowt up in t'workshop loft so making one wouldn't be too hard if I seriously get the wants.

Abwood double wheel one up too at less. Much better value for money if you have space.

Surprised to see on one picture that there actually is an angle scale visible if the beast is really clean. Which is so not normal.

Clive.

duncan webster16/03/2019 15:42:02
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2016 forum posts
30 photos

That's just silly money, I thought I did well getting £70 for mine. At that price you could get a Worden, granted not built like a battleship, but more functionality

Michael Gilligan16/03/2019 15:59:13
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12924 forum posts
555 photos
Posted by Clive India on 16/03/2019 09:19:49:
.
Back to the prologue...

.

Q. What is this grinder ?

A. The sort of thing that RJH Engineering once made:

**LINK**

https://www.rjhfinishing.co.uk/about

MichaelG.

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