By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Rack operated tailstock

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Peter Spink22/02/2019 20:01:56
avatar
87 forum posts
37 photos

Fed up with twiddling handle so have fancied one of these for some time:

**LINK**

Any disadvantages e.g. lack of self eject?

Possibility of mounting some sort of depth indicator?

Meunier22/02/2019 21:42:32
306 forum posts
1 photos

Peter, my ML7 has the Cowells rack-feed tailstock (already fitted when bought in 1973) and find it very useful. When drilling from tailstock it is easy to take 'pecks' and pull back to clear chips without twiddling handwheel and force applied is better sensed than with a wheel and possibly reduces drill breakages. With benefit of having used it, if starting from scratch today would (gulp - how much) still feel it was well worthwhile. From pics I've seen believe CornishJack/Bill has the same unit. Can't see if the Myford unit has graduated collar, mine has a resettable collar to show advance of quill in 1/8in increments. When ejecting 2MT inserts, just lock tailstock and quill and use a length of 1/4ins rod with a ball on the end and so far have not needed to resort to a hammer.
DaveD

Hopper22/02/2019 23:34:40
avatar
4379 forum posts
92 photos

There was a thread on here a while back about making your own lever-operated version that provides a similar result for a lot less money, if budget is an issue. Geoff Walker did an article about one in MEW a couple of years back with full drawings etc.

Edited By Hopper on 22/02/2019 23:35:18

Ian Parkin23/02/2019 07:11:21
avatar
765 forum posts
185 photos

dsc00689 (medium).jpgHere is one I made for a Colchester student out of a mini steering rack

HasBean23/02/2019 10:27:53
137 forum posts
31 photos

I've had one for a few years now (bought from the 'old' Myford) and prefer it to the handwheel. Mine has a friction collar graduated in MM and sliding stop at the rear with a locking screw. It's a bit of a pain having to use a knocking bar to eject tooling, especially as I'm short of room to the right of the lathe, but I've been meaning to make up a combined drawbar/ejector to get over this (the bits for this are sitting on my bench, have been for four years blush  )

Paul

 

p1000546.jpg

p1000547.jpg

Edited By HasBean on 23/02/2019 10:28:26

Georgineer23/02/2019 11:49:23
340 forum posts
16 photos

Having worked extensively with self-ejecting tailstocks, I regard them as a fiddly nuisance. My home lathe has a lever-operated tailstock, and a 'bopper' of mild steel rod with a lump at the end to give more mass, and stop it sliding right through. It's so much easier and quicker to use when changing tooling.

George

Nick Clarke 323/02/2019 14:17:20
avatar
666 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by Georgineer on 23/02/2019 11:49:23:

Having worked extensively with self-ejecting tailstocks, I regard them as a fiddly nuisance. My home lathe has a lever-operated tailstock, and a 'bopper' of mild steel rod with a lump at the end to give more mass, and stop it sliding right through. It's so much easier and quicker to use when changing tooling.

George

Plus one for non self ejecting tailstocks. they can eject at the most inconveniently with a single moment's inattention and the next time you can't get the *******ing tool out no matter how hard it is wound back in.

Worst thing for me is using lathes at home and in the club workshop which are all different, and if the ejector has moved a bit when you are just trying to get the last bit of a hole cleared by pulling the drill out - the scale on the tailstock spindle says it is ok, but no it isn't! sad

Edited By Nick Clarke 3 on 23/02/2019 14:19:29

Edited By Nick Clarke 3 on 23/02/2019 14:20:53

Peter Spink23/02/2019 16:02:28
avatar
87 forum posts
37 photos

Thanks chaps for all your replies, my mind is made up and I have a birthday coming up!

My tailstock taper is worn (probably because of self ejecting at the wrong moment), so was due for attention.

Will need to break out the grey paint though 😄

martin perman23/02/2019 16:50:50
avatar
1808 forum posts
78 photos

Silly question gentlemen,

Apart from replacing a thread with a rack you still have to twiddle a wheel to move it and surely a thread is a lot more accurate than a rack.

Martin P

Cornish Jack23/02/2019 18:03:14
1083 forum posts
152 photos

Meunier is quite correct - I do have one (Cowells) fitted to my ML7. Excellent as compared to the handwheel and bought it to replace a basic 'home-brew', made because I was fed-up with the original.

rgds

Bill

Michael Gilligan23/02/2019 18:13:08
avatar
15442 forum posts
666 photos
Posted by martin perman on 23/02/2019 16:50:50:

Silly question gentlemen,

Apart from replacing a thread with a rack you still have to twiddle a wheel to move it and surely a thread is a lot more accurate than a rack.

Martin P

.

But [assuming that you are using it as such] it's effectively a pillar drill lain on its back ... and you don't see many of those with a handwheel and screw thread.

MichaelG.

 

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 23/02/2019 18:23:21

Hillclimber28/10/2019 18:18:16
avatar
162 forum posts
37 photos
Posted by HasBean on 23/02/2019 10:27:53:

I've been meaning to make up a combined drawbar/ejector to get over this (the bits for this are sitting on my bench, have been for four years blush )

Paul

Paul, have you completed that drawbar/ejector yet? And do you have any piccies/ drawings?

I acquired one of these a couple of weeks ago. Spent 15 minutes fitting it this morning, and used it for its first job. My first thought was 'why did I not get one of these before'? The second was 'shame it doesn't self-eject, but upside is that it will take a drawbar'. And the final one was, 'I bet you could make a combined drawbar/ejector' - before remembering that google is my friend.

So any and all help welcome with that design.....?

Cheers, Colin

Meunier28/10/2019 19:42:33
306 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by Peter Spink on 23/02/2019 16:02:28:

Thanks chaps for all your replies, my mind is made up and I have a birthday coming up!...../

Did you eventually treat yourself for your birthday Peter and, if so, what was your feedback ?
DaveD

Peter Spink28/10/2019 20:52:51
avatar
87 forum posts
37 photos

Hi Dave,

Yes I did get one and very pleased with it - I too wish I'd bought one years ago.

As regards extraction, so far I must admit to using lump of M12 studding as a rapping bar - crude but works until I get round to making something more sophisticated! smiley

Peter

Rod Renshaw28/10/2019 21:12:48
86 forum posts

I have one these ( same as HasBeans, except mine has 1/16" graduations) and I prefer it to the handwheel. I can estimate a depth to about 1/64" which seems accurate enough for drilling holes. The standard Myford handwheel tailstock has no graduations on the handwheel and the depth has to be estimated from the 1/8" graduations on the barrel itself. The other advantages are that the taper in the barrel is very easy to clean out and one can use a drawbar to secure collets and turrets in the tailstock. I have made a "bumper out" from a length of 1/2" steel bar with a brass tip on one end and a simple, but weighty, steel handle on the other. I keep this loose in the tailstock barrel and I don't miss the self-eject facility. The same bumper out is also useful in the headstock.

Rod

HasBean29/10/2019 11:00:56
137 forum posts
31 photos

Hi Colin,

I'm afraid not, the bits are still sitting on the bench. Work seems to be getting in the way of everything these days sad

Hillclimber29/10/2019 11:53:46
avatar
162 forum posts
37 photos

Paul, I've been busy in the last few weeks finishing small projects that have equally been on or around my workbench, so I could get back to doing the things they were intended to help me with!

If you have a sketched idea kicking around, it would be great to share. Otherwise expect to my thoughts next week or so....

Cheers, Colin

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
Eccentric July 5 2018
Ausee.com.au
Allendale Electronics
Warco
cowells
ChesterUK
emcomachinetools
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest