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print-offable and laminatable chart

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Guy Lamb03/02/2019 12:30:58
34 forum posts

Please forgive me if I've posted this in the wrong section, though it is in question form but, could someone suggest where I could look for a printable chart of screw cutting gear ratios for my Myford ML7 ? My machine didn't have a table on the inside of the guard as is usual practice. Trawls on'tinterweb have been fruitless

Guy

Chris Evans 603/02/2019 12:39:23
1376 forum posts

I am not a Myford man but a search on here should come up with spread sheets giving you what you need. It has been discussed several times.

Roderick Jenkins03/02/2019 13:01:07
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1688 forum posts
431 photos

Guy,

These are from Bradley's Series 7 Manual:

myford imperial.jpg

myford metric.jpg

 

changewheel setups.jpg

HTH,

Rod

Edit:  Forgot to add the setups

Edited By Roderick Jenkins on 03/02/2019 13:08:04

Edited By Roderick Jenkins on 03/02/2019 13:08:55

Vic03/02/2019 13:38:26
1992 forum posts
10 photos

Well done Rod, that’s a comprehensive answer!

Brian Oldford03/02/2019 13:51:24
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476 forum posts
4 photos

Or try http://metal.duncanamps.com/software.php

John Purdy04/02/2019 22:37:15
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142 forum posts
45 photos

Guy

I found that the chart in the gear cover was hard to read with the lighting in my shop so I printed it out 8 1/2 x 11, laminated it, and it hangs on the wall behind the lathe were I can read it while standing it front of the lathe.

I have it as a PDF file and can send it to you if you pm me your e-mail address. You can then print it out and laminate it.

John

dscn3168.jpgdscn3169.jpg

Lambton05/02/2019 09:06:28
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669 forum posts
2 photos

Guy.

Mau I suggest that you obtain a genuine Myford handbook for your lathe. Obtainable from "new" Myford or even as a PDF from the net. The handbook tells you all you really need to know about using and maintaining the lathe.

Eric

Neil Wyatt05/02/2019 11:47:43
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Moderator
15700 forum posts
659 photos
73 articles

You could buy Brian's book and rip the pages out, but he would probably come around and confiscate your lathe as punishment

Neil

norm norton05/02/2019 14:46:46
90 forum posts
5 photos

I love the last line in the chart showing what you need for 569 TPI (!!!) Can't think of an immediate use for that..

Out of interest, what is the finest thread used on a practical object that is known of?

Norm

not done it yet05/02/2019 15:10:12
2715 forum posts
11 photos

Only the last line? I reckon the last 15 lines are likely never used for threading! Anyone on here cutting threads of more than 60tpi?

Question might be: Is 1.8 thou per rev a small enough increment for all power feed uses? I would have though it would be - at least for most jobs.

Bob Mc05/02/2019 15:13:54
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120 forum posts
22 photos

Micrometer...? dont know

John Purdy05/02/2019 17:50:11
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142 forum posts
45 photos

The last half dozen or so lines on the inch chart are intended as fine feeds. I only added the TPI out of curiosity!  120 TPI is UNF 000 and 160 is 0000 but obviously a thread of 569 TPI is a little over the top and not much practical use, at least for the kind of work we do!

John

Edited By John Purdy on 05/02/2019 18:05:18

mark costello 105/02/2019 21:13:57
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498 forum posts
12 photos

What would be the thread depth for 569 tpi? Where can I get a tap?

SillyOldDuffer05/02/2019 21:31:36
3993 forum posts
810 photos
Posted by norm norton on 05/02/2019 14:46:46:

I love the last line in the chart showing what you need for 569 TPI (!!!) Can't think of an immediate use for that..

Out of interest, what is the finest thread used on a practical object that is known of?

Norm

My best offer is 508tpi on a micro-adjuster. I found this on the Kozak website:

Our imperial sized matched set micro positioning adjustment screws and unbraked bushings deliver precision smooth movements in the most demanding OEM applications. These matched sets provide the smoothest and most precise movements in the industry with sub micron resolution not commonly found in direct drive hardware offering 127 TPI (.0079" per rev.), 200 TPI (.005" per rev.), 254 TPI (.0039" per rev.), and 508 TPI (.0019" per rev.), taking ultra fine to new industry levels.

Not sure how standard the threads are - they also say 'Note: Kozak Micro cannot guarantee that our screws and bushings will be compatible with screws and bushings sold by other manufacturers. '

Dave

Michael Gilligan05/02/2019 21:55:03
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12776 forum posts
554 photos

Oh, of course ... 508tpi is [very nearly] 0.05mm pitch

I was surprised to see how moderately-priced they are !

MichaelG.

.

http://catalog.kozakmicro.com/viewitems/imperial-us-screw-bushing-matched-sets/ial-us-screw-bushing-matched-sets-1-4-508-tpi-sets

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 05/02/2019 21:55:36

Mike Poole05/02/2019 22:34:44
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1811 forum posts
44 photos
Posted by mark costello 1 on 05/02/2019 21:13:57:

What would be the thread depth for 569 tpi? Where can I get a tap?

I think you might have to make one, at least the gear train has already been worked out for youwink 2

Mike

norm norton06/02/2019 09:56:06
90 forum posts
5 photos
Posted by John Purdy on 05/02/2019 17:50:11:

The last half dozen or so lines on the inch chart are intended as fine feeds.

Very rude of us John to find humour in your fine feed numbers and I apologise for starting it. What you have listed is a perfectly logical way of showing the fineness of feed.

But I like that idea that at 569 TPI my Myford Series Seven might do better than the 'world's finest known thread' of 508 TPI. I might have a try, should I sharpen the 60 degree Whitworth tool first?

Brian Wood06/02/2019 11:00:22
1853 forum posts
36 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 05/02/2019 11:47:43:

You could buy Brian's book and rip the pages out, but he would probably come around and confiscate your lathe as punishment

Neil

Sacrilege indeed, but it would be your lathe I would impound for the suggestion !!

Brian

Michael Gilligan06/02/2019 11:37:44
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12776 forum posts
554 photos
Posted by norm norton on 06/02/2019 09:56:06:
... should I sharpen the 60 degree Whitworth tool first?

.

dont know unlikely

... but you might check the angle.

MichaelG.

John Purdy06/02/2019 20:20:55
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142 forum posts
45 photos

Norm

Yes your tool will have to be very sharp. The theoretical tip radius for a 569 TPI Whitworth thread is only .000247" and the flat on a 60deg. tool for a UN thread is .000225" wide!    Good luck measuring that, at least with our normal measuring kit.   About all you could do is to sharpen it to as fine a point as you can and as the theoretical thread depth for a sharp Whitworth thread is only .00173' and a 60 deg. one is .0016 there wouldn't be much of a tip load!

John

 

Edited By John Purdy on 06/02/2019 20:38:11

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