By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Oct 11th

Rotary table + cross slide ....... why ?

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
BW03/02/2019 07:56:18
244 forum posts
40 photos

What would you use this for please ? Am puzzled.

https://www.chronos.ltd.uk/cgi-bin/sh000001.pl?WD=rotary%20table&PN=SCT-Rotary-Tables%2ehtml#a40314002A

Bill

Edited By JasonB on 03/02/2019 08:04:49

Brian G03/02/2019 08:37:34
586 forum posts
25 photos

A cross slide on top of a rotary table would simplify milling a rectangular object with rounded corners or perhaps a flycrank as a single operation (rotate around one centre, traverse, rotate around the other centre, traverse). I had been considering making a slide to fit my rotary table for this very reason. You could also make a slot with rounded ends whose radius didn't match any of your cutters.

On the other hand I have no idea what you could do with the other version that has a rotary table on top of a cross slide that you couldn't do with a rotary table on a milling machine. It might be useful as as a vertical slide on a lathe, or at some other angle on a sine bar?

Brian

Jeff Dayman03/02/2019 08:38:15
1621 forum posts
40 photos

Quite handy for connecting rods and other linkage parts, for rounding ends and transitioning to side profiling without setting up again.

Also deals with any setups where people make top sub-plates for work holding on their rotary tables.

Will take up a lot of Z height though, if the mill is on the small side in Z already.

A bit beyond my budget though.

Michael Gilligan03/02/2019 08:48:20
avatar
13974 forum posts
605 photos

Bill

Have a look at the BCA pages on lathes.co.uk

... or the description of any horological style mill/jig-borer

It should soon become apparent what this contraption is attempting to emulate.

MichaelG.

.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/bca/

https://www.chronos.ltd.uk/wp-content/uploads/taspecs.jpg

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 03/02/2019 08:59:13

IanT03/02/2019 09:35:38
1310 forum posts
132 photos

This is about the best explanation I've seen - covers the essential details...

https://rick.sparber.org/rtcs.pdf

Regards,

IanT

John Haine03/02/2019 09:48:35
2600 forum posts
133 photos

Looks good on a shelf? Funny that the dimensioned drawing seems to show a machine vice rather than a coordinate table, but 6 inches height? and by the time you've added some clamps on the table you've run out of space for any but small parts, or you add a vice and lose more height!!

Silly idea IMHO - most parts are dimensioned relative to orthogonal XY coordinates, but with this the coordinates rotate!

JasonB03/02/2019 10:16:03
avatar
Moderator
16227 forum posts
1712 photos
1 articles
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 03/02/2019 08:48:20:

It should soon become apparent what this contraption is attempting to emulate.

MichaelG.

.

The one in question is the opposite way round to the BCA substitute - RT under the cross slides

Michael Gilligan03/02/2019 10:16:40
avatar
13974 forum posts
605 photos
Posted by John Haine on 03/02/2019 09:48:35:

Funny that the dimensioned drawing seems to show a machine vice

.

dont know ... I carefully selected the drawing that shows the rotary table atop X & Y slides

MichaelG.

Michael Gilligan03/02/2019 10:18:00
avatar
13974 forum posts
605 photos
Posted by JasonB on 03/02/2019 10:16:03:
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 03/02/2019 08:48:20:

 

It should soon become apparent what this contraption is attempting to emulate.

MichaelG.

.

The one in question is the opposite way round to the BCA substitute - RT under the cross slides

.

But the one I linked [previously mentioned in Brian G's post] isn't !!

MichaelG.

.

P.S. ... for the reason of understanding the usage; does it really matter in what order the axes are stacked ?

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 03/02/2019 10:36:34

not done it yet03/02/2019 10:34:38
3339 forum posts
11 photos

All it needs is a tilting vice under, or on, it and most angles could be covered! As well as using up even more vertical work space.smiley

Brian G03/02/2019 10:41:24
586 forum posts
25 photos

To be fair to the device, I had only considered milling. Used with a rigid pillar drill (i.e. not my one), the second type could be a useful substitute for a jig borer. A tiny version would go nicely with our recently acquired Proxxon drill - the one in the link appears to be bigger than either the drill or my budget

Brian

Michael Gilligan03/02/2019 10:50:27
avatar
13974 forum posts
605 photos
Posted by IanT on 03/02/2019 09:35:38:

This is about the best explanation I've seen - covers the essential details...

https://rick.sparber.org/rtcs.pdf

.

Nice find, Ian yes

**LINK** for convenience.

MichaelG.

John MC03/02/2019 11:47:31
avatar
181 forum posts
24 photos

I have a Pollard Corona drill that has an X-Y table with an old Ortec DRO fitted, bolted permanently to the work table. Extremely useful, with a trued up vice and an edge finder I rarely mark out before drilling now. If the X -Y+rotary table had more travel I think I would buy one to extend the versitality of the set up I have described.

John

Chris Trice03/02/2019 11:50:35
avatar
1362 forum posts
9 photos

The SCT version lower down on the same Chronos page has an embarrassingly off centre tee slot for an advertising photo.

Paul H 103/02/2019 13:47:46
28 forum posts

Thank you for the link. Taking a look at the https://rick.sparber.org site reveals lots of other interesting stuff to look at. He has a lot on building the Gingery Shaper for instance.

IanT03/02/2019 14:34:18
1310 forum posts
132 photos

Yes Paul - there is a ton of stuff on Ricks' site (which might not be too obvious on first sight) - and it's very well worth a browse. I first "found" him when looking for a 'Shaper' vice - he has some interesting ideas in this area - and many other topics.

Regards,

IanT

Mike E.03/02/2019 15:01:25
192 forum posts
1 photos

I have a Palmgren rotary table with the x & y cross slides. When I was young, all I had was a drill press, and paired with the x/y rotary table served me admirably for light milling and making custom spool hubs for the chopped bikes I worked on back in the early 1970's. Would have loved to have had a mill back then.

BW04/02/2019 09:39:16
244 forum posts
40 photos

Thanks for all the info.

Bill

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Eccentric Engineering
Ausee.com.au
TRANSWAVE Converters
ChesterUK
cowbells
Meridienne oct 2019
Eccentric July 5 2018
Warco
Allendale Electronics
emcomachinetools
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest