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Parting off tool - straight or angled.

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3404631/01/2019 17:54:10
580 forum posts
6 photos

Arceurotrade list a horizontal and also an angled ( uphill ) parting off tool for the Sieg sc3 lathe.

Advice please on which one members would use.

Thanks

Bill

HOWARDT31/01/2019 18:14:57
426 forum posts
14 photos

I use the 1.5 x 10 M42 plain with angled sides. Much stronger than the plain hss bit.

XD 35131/01/2019 18:23:00
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1295 forum posts
111 photos

I will assume that the horizontal tool is the HSS unit and the angled tool is the carbide insert type they have listed ?

JasonB31/01/2019 18:28:55
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Moderator
15743 forum posts
1646 photos
1 articles

Do you mean the holders? if so the angled one saves having to grind the top of the tool, just touch up the end on a grinder. Down side is that if you advance the tool for a deep cut then that means ctr height has to be reset so pros and cons for each.

John Haine31/01/2019 18:32:16
2575 forum posts
133 photos

When asking questions of this sort about items available on the web it makes it much easier if links can be provided so people can see what is being asked about rather than having to guess.

3404631/01/2019 18:34:16
580 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by XD 351 on 31/01/2019 18:23:00:

I will assume that the horizontal tool is the HSS unit and the angled tool is the carbide insert type they have listed ?

The catalogue lists a HSS blade only, It is the quick change tool post system with various holders.

The same blade fits either holder and they list two options on the holder.

One is horizontal and the other one has the blade inclined upwards at 4 degrees.

The catalogue just says horizontal or angled.

I ask because the unimat only had a horizontal blade so confused by this choice.

Thanks

Bill

3404631/01/2019 18:40:00
580 forum posts
6 photos

Model 000 Parting Tool Holder - Angled

This is the angled 4 degree one - the other is identical but horizontal

Best I can do from their on line catalogue

Bill

3404631/01/2019 18:42:43
580 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by John Haine on 31/01/2019 18:32:16:

When asking questions of this sort about items available on the web it makes it much easier if links can be provided so people can see what is being asked about rather than having to guess.

Agreed - but as I am as thick as two short planks when it comes to computers I struggle.

Sorry, but I have no idea what a link is or how to do it.

I have cut and posted an image - that is the limit of my expertise..

3404631/01/2019 18:45:56
580 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by JasonB on 31/01/2019 18:28:55:

Do you mean the holders? if so the angled one saves having to grind the top of the tool, just touch up the end on a grinder. Down side is that if you advance the tool for a deep cut then that means ctr height has to be reset so pros and cons for each.

Jason thanks - yes I mean the holders as the blades are the same.

Sorry if it is a daft question to some members m but I am still wearing L plates in this hobby

Bill

 

Edited By JasonB on 31/01/2019 18:54:59

peak431/01/2019 18:54:19
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786 forum posts
67 photos

Well according to the catalogue, the angled one isn't suitable for use with mini-lathes as it raises the cutting edge to high.

Other than that, flat for brass, angled for steel maybe. ????

Bill

3404631/01/2019 19:01:45
580 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by peak4 on 31/01/2019 18:54:19:

Well according to the catalogue, the angled one isn't suitable for use with mini-lathes as it raises the cutting edge to high.

Other than that, flat for brass, angled for steel maybe. ????

Bill

Hello Bill

Just what I wanted to know.

Many thanks indeed, so I will order the horizontal one.

I was confused as it is showing in the mini lathe section in the catalogue they sent me today with some other items.

Thanks to all who kindly posted.

Bill

peak431/01/2019 19:28:00
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786 forum posts
67 photos

Bill double check yourself from this link

 

Note: This tool holder is not suitable for Mini-Lathes since the 4° angle raises the tool too high for these machines. Please choose the Horizontal parting tool holder 090-070-00356 for use with Mini-Lathes.

 

I'm not familiar with Seig stuff, so I don't know what defines a Mini-Lathe.

Bill

Edited By peak4 on 31/01/2019 19:28:29

3404631/01/2019 19:37:01
580 forum posts
6 photos

Bill.

Double checked as suggested and more than happy with the info in the link.

The paper catalogue which they sent, they did say it was last years as all they had, does not tell you that.

Mini lathes in their catalogue is the sc2 and sc3.

Bill, I am most grateful to you for taking the time to look and sort.

Well pleased

Bill

not done it yet31/01/2019 23:57:55
3148 forum posts
11 photos

I bought a QCTP set and regretted it. The parting tool holder was angled. It never gets used now and eventually the holder will likely get butchered to accommodate some other cutter.

Hopper01/02/2019 07:42:50
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3651 forum posts
72 photos

I always use my HSS parting tools dead horizontal, on steel, brass or whatever. No angle ground on the top of the blade either. No problems at all, parting up to 2" diameter steel on an 80-year-old hobby lathe. The do work best inverted and in a rear toolpost though. Seems to let the chips fall out without jamming up the works.

dscn1078.jpg

larry phelan 101/02/2019 10:59:02
458 forum posts
11 photos

Hi Hopper,

I too always use the parting off tool mounted in the rear toolpost,but never tried parting off as shown in your picture !! I seldom use a steady but I can see how useful it could be when dealing with big dia bars.

Thanks for the post.smiley

Hopper01/02/2019 11:36:54
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3651 forum posts
72 photos
Posted by larry phelan 1 on 01/02/2019 10:59:02:

Hi Hopper,

I too always use the parting off tool mounted in the rear toolpost,but never tried parting off as shown in your picture !! I seldom use a steady but I can see how useful it could be when dealing with big dia bars.

Thanks for the post.smiley

You're welcome. Yes, handy when dealing with bar too big to fit up the chuck or spindle hole. Also means you part off exactly how much you need for the job in hand from the end of your piece of stock. So you can even machine the job to finish where it sticks out of the steady, then part it off to final length. That way you don't end up with a box full of noggin ends that were left in the chuck after parting off the job.

Even when parting off, or knurling, shorter jobs, putting the steady between the tool and the chuck takes strain off the headstock bearings and spindle, which are  a tad undersized on the aged Drummond Flagellator and prone to shimmying about a bit if pushed.

Edited By Hopper on 01/02/2019 11:39:00

Brian John01/02/2019 13:01:07
1450 forum posts
579 photos

Why should the rear tool post give a better result then the standard tool post ?

Hopper01/02/2019 13:07:00
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3651 forum posts
72 photos

Hi Brian. Long time no see.

For one thing, the chips fall out of the groove and don't jam up between the sides of the groove and the tool.

For another, more widely debated, thing, forces on the headstock bearings are downwards towards the more solid lower half of the headstock rather than the flimsier top bearing covers.

mgnbuk01/02/2019 13:12:47
507 forum posts
10 photos

Why should the rear tool post give a better result then the standard tool post ?

When the parting too is inverted in the rear tool post, if it digs in it can "escape" into fresh air, whereas a front mounted tool will get dragged into (and under) the workpiece and probably break was the reason I recall being given.

Isn't the idea with the angled holder to give easier sharpening of the tool blank ? The top rake is provided by the tool holder, so only the front face of the tool blank requires grinding. On a "flat" holder, top rake as to be ground in, which can lead to more wastage on the tool blank when regrinding is required.

Nigel B

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