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nylon gib strip grub screws?

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Peter F14/01/2019 23:48:47
98 forum posts
23 photos

Hi, I've been searching for where to buy this style of grub screw, they have a nylon 'pellet' in them, or at least that's the description of them I can find, does anyone know any other names these go by? I might be searching for the wrong name.gggggg.jpg

Brian Sweeting15/01/2019 00:11:44
349 forum posts
1 photos

Try "self locking grub screws" to get started.

Some similar here - **LINK**

Waggonerman15/01/2019 00:13:08
7 forum posts
2 photos

These used to be known as ‘Wedgelock’, now mostly replaced by ‘Loctite’ type threadlockers due to cost of manufacture, still useful for adjustment screws that need some resistance to vibration.

Also used to be a nylon inserted strip type call ‘Longlock’ these were more expensive still but held well over a longer thread length.

Michael Gilligan15/01/2019 00:20:41
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13111 forum posts
571 photos

Peter,

They are also known as wedglok: **LINK**

https://www.fastenerdata.co.uk/thread-patch-pellet-tip

MichaelG.

.

Waggonerman beat me to it.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 15/01/2019 00:21:44

Peter F15/01/2019 00:45:24
98 forum posts
23 photos

Thanks, that's the kind of thing I'm looking for, they only have one size though, and doing a google search, They seem to be the only place in the UK that sells them.

Michael Gilligan15/01/2019 00:54:55
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13111 forum posts
571 photos

What size are you looking for, Peter ?

MichaelG.

Peter F15/01/2019 01:01:53
98 forum posts
23 photos

Michael, I was looking for m6 x12mm specifically, but if I could find somewhere that sells these maybe some m5 too

BW15/01/2019 02:57:45
211 forum posts
37 photos

I have seen a note somewhere where a chap made a diy version by drilling a hole through the screw and depending upon size of hole used some fishing line or whipper snipper cable as the plug.

A letter in one of the recent magazines ? Cannot remember.

Bill

Alan Charleston15/01/2019 04:58:37
72 forum posts
19 photos

Hi Peter,

Would wrapping a grubscrew in teflon tape give the same effect? You may need to roughen the thread surface by gripping it hard in a pair of pliers to stop the teflon slipping and experiment with the number of turns of tape but it should be possible to end up with a screw which is resistant to vibration turning.

Regards,

Alan

not done it yet15/01/2019 07:59:21
2933 forum posts
11 photos

Hardened grub screws? Easy enough to drill if not, but still possible. Air Arms trigger adjusting screws are restrained by an acetal pip, which may be easier, than nylon, to machine.

Michael Gilligan15/01/2019 08:07:00
avatar
13111 forum posts
571 photos

Peter,

You might find a few hints in this previous thread:

**LINK**

https://www.model-engineer.co.uk/forums/postings.asp?th=99448&p=2

MichaelG.

.

Specifically my link to this alternative with similar functionality:

https://nylok.com/products/nylok-blue-patch

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 15/01/2019 08:12:21

ega15/01/2019 18:08:36
1159 forum posts
95 photos
Posted by BW on 15/01/2019 02:57:45:

I have seen a note somewhere where a chap made a diy version by drilling a hole through the screw and depending upon size of hole used some fishing line or whipper snipper cable as the plug.

A letter in one of the recent magazines ? Cannot remember.

Bill

This idea was also presented on the Practical Machinist website and I can vouch for its efficacy. The screws are best drilled using a simple jig to hold them and align the drill. If "whipper snipper" is the same as strimmer then that is what I used!

Douglas Johnston15/01/2019 18:28:36
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573 forum posts
32 photos

How about drilling a short hole in the side of the screw and filling with hot glue, leaving the glue a little proud of the surface. Perhaps even just smear the glue over part of the thread without drilling at all.

Doug

Rob Rimmer15/01/2019 18:37:06
92 forum posts
1 photos

You could approach this from a different angle - how about a drilled and tapped hole perpendicular to the axis of the grub screw, with a nylon screw in it? Of course you wouldn't want to do it on your heritage lathe, but might work OK in some situations.

Rob

EDIT: Sudden thought - cut a slot with a Dremel disc for a length of strimmer line

Edited By Rob Rimmer on 15/01/2019 18:57:29

Michael Gilligan15/01/2019 18:46:05
avatar
13111 forum posts
571 photos

For info. ... Nylok [or probably a clone] screws, as mentioned above, are so effective and so commonplace that IKEA is using them.

MichaelG.

Howard Lewis15/01/2019 21:57:26
1947 forum posts
2 photos

I have heard of folk just putting a bit of nylon fishing line in the hole and then following with a plain grubscrew.

The idea is that the sideways pressure generates enough friction on the threads to prevent or at least discourage movement.

Trust me to come up with something cheap, quick and nasty!

Howard

Peter F16/01/2019 17:32:59
98 forum posts
23 photos

Thanks to everyone who commented, I actually found somewhere that can order them in, so I'm going to get a price, they probably won't be cheap, this style grub screw was the standard one that came with my Mill, I've never seen them before, and I'm surprised they're not more common given it takes away the chance of losing the correct position when you tighten the locking nut, If they're too much I'm going to replace my Lathe with them too.

Ideas on how you could make them, I's use stainless, make maybe a 2mm hole all the way through, then use some thermo plastic (if you've never used this before, it's very tough like nylon) soften if up in boiling water as instructed, and just push a bit through the hole, I might try this regardless.

Neil Wyatt16/01/2019 17:35:06
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15990 forum posts
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Posted by Peter F on 16/01/2019 17:32:59:

Thanks to everyone who commented, I actually found somewhere that can order them in, so I'm going to get a price, they probably won't be cheap, this style grub screw was the standard one that came with my Mill, I've never seen them before, and I'm surprised they're not more common given it takes away the chance of losing the correct position when you tighten the locking nut, If they're too much I'm going to replace my Lathe with them too.

Ideas on how you could make them, I's use stainless, make maybe a 2mm hole all the way through, then use some thermo plastic (if you've never used this before, it's very tough like nylon) soften if up in boiling water as instructed, and just push a bit through the hole, I might try this regardless.

A sample pack of 10m of 1.75mm nylon 3D printer filament might do, or strimmer cord was mentioned - various diameters.

Peter F16/01/2019 18:16:01
98 forum posts
23 photos

Yeah, there's a few things that might be worth trying, I just happened to have some of that thermo plastic, also as it re-hardens from its malleable state, it expands very slightly, so it might hold itself in the hole.

Harry Wilkes16/01/2019 18:16:05
avatar
670 forum posts
59 photos

Having worked in the thread fastening industry for some years I'd go with Rob's 'cut a slot with a Dremel disc for a length of strimmer line'

H

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