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What Did You Do Today 2019

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John Haine30/11/2019 10:48:29
3157 forum posts
171 photos
Posted by mechman48 on 29/11/2019 17:49:25:

Yesterday actually; Had a play with my new toy, a mini belt sander sold on Banggood ( usual disclaimer ) at a very reasonable price, early Xmas gift to oneself … devil … used it to sand away some excess from my beam engine frames, does a nice job so far.

George.

George, that looks a nice little unit. I found it cheaper on eBay than Banggod, at the price I couldn't buy the materials, so have ordered one.

Danny M2Z30/11/2019 11:50:40
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865 forum posts
283 photos

Today I had a play with my new toy Digital Torque Wrench which although purposed for fine tuning my target shooting rifles I noticed that it might be useful for the head bolts on my model aircraft engines.It was!

* Danny M *

Neil Wyatt30/11/2019 15:46:58
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Posted by Nigel Graham 2 on 29/11/2019 22:34:26:.

The cave, called Spider Hole,

Cripes, two phobias for the price of one!

crook

Neil

Ian P30/11/2019 21:33:34
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2406 forum posts
101 photos
Posted by Danny M2Z on 30/11/2019 11:50:40:

Today I had a play with my new toy Digital Torque Wrench which although purposed for fine tuning my target shooting rifles I noticed that it might be useful for the head bolts on my model aircraft engines.It was!

* Danny M *

Is the torque wrench in your link the correct one?

There is no mention of digital or electronics on the webpage, in fact there is little mention of anything that has any real meaning. If I were a potential customer for a small torque wrench the lack of a proper description or specification would eliminate that one in a flash.

Ian P

Nigel Graham 230/11/2019 22:26:31
665 forum posts
15 photos

Neil:

"two phobias for the price of one!"

What, spiders and caves?

The spiders are only in the entrance area, and they are rather handsome little animals, in a fetching, gloss brown and grey livery. I think they are of the breed called the Cave Spider, glorying in the species name Meta Menardii, which favours caves, cellars and tunnels.

One of my phobias is of heights, which is not very helpful in that particular place! It is not tight, but is very determinedly vertical. Well, it does have to drop a few hundred feet in altitude to reach outlet level maybe only about a mile away in a straight line - though we won't know the actual passage distance until it's found.

I am now engaged in a similar project not far from there, for which I built a simple winch for handling tools and spoil in the vertical entrance shaft.

It's just a large rope-reel on a scaffolding tripod standing over the shaft. Fabricated-PVC drum: a left-over from something at work. Bearings: plastic bushes, revolving between steel collars on a length of aluminium scaffold-tube. Sides: PVC sheet drum-cheeks, inside two hexagonal side-frames giving a 4:1 mechanical advantage by diameter, welded from flat bar.

Source of bar: worn-out miniature-railway track!

To set out the 120º inside angles for the 3 bar-pairs eventually united in each hexagon (an attempt to distribute errors), I had to resort to geometrical construction on a sheet of plywood; by rule, pencil and a rather lovely beam-compass that looks as if an apprentice-piece by Anon, many years ago. The bars were clamped to angle-plates along the pencil-lines, with the corner clear of the board edge for the first weld.

Danny M2Z30/11/2019 23:09:46
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865 forum posts
283 photos
Posted by Ian P on 30/11/2019 21:33:34:

Is the torque wrench in your link the correct one?

Sorry, my linky was a bit lacking in detail. Here is a better one with more info FAT Wrench Reviews

I purchased the digital version as it is more accurate and easier to use than the analogue one.

* Danny M *

Nigel Graham 202/12/2019 00:23:53
665 forum posts
15 photos

A leisurely sunny afternoon in the local Christmas street " fayre " - not that the traders were all local!

Then a couple of hours or so this evening, detailing the cylinders for my steam-wagon, cut from a rectangular block of cast-iron.

I'd managed to miss thinking far enough ahead about actually getting steam in and out of the right bits, so I've a fair bit of head-scratching and wangling to work out where to drill passages big enough for the steam, but which won't run into stud holes or the port-to-cylinder passages.

The HP side is easy - ish as I can use a flange fitting on the valve-chest flank, but the rest might entail some tricky angled drilling and external plumbing.

I'd drawing it in TurboCAD, orthogonally only; with the part-machined block and a rule next to the computer. Apart from my not using 3D anyway, 2D directly relates the design to machine-tool travels, so helps avoid the trap of 3D-models that look pretty on screen, but prove very difficult or impossible to make.

I did try Alibre, from the MEW series, and had previously flirted briefly with Fusion, but realised that was a mistake because apart from their long-way-round approach, I'd already bought and made some progress with TurboCAD, with its default 2D/3D choice. TC used to be advertised in "our " magazines but seems to have disappeared. Anyone know why?

Meanwhile my drawing-board still forlornly dominates the dining-room, draped in caving-kit hung up to air.

Andrew Johnston02/12/2019 16:14:28
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5548 forum posts
650 photos

Now that I'm a member of the unwashed, aka unemployed, I've finally got time to look properly at items I bought years ago on Ebay. First, a Clarkson Dedlock chuck, shown here disassembled:

dedlock_chuck.jpg

The shaft top left is interesting; a double start ground thread and it's a moot point if the next bit down is a multistart thread, a helical spline or a helical gear. It's one thing grinding the external "thread", but the internal "thread" would be more of a challenge. And here's the chuck reassembled with a cutter in place:

dedlock_cutter.jpg

It works in a similar way to the Clarkson chucks for threaded cutters. If the cutter rotates slightly, due to cutting forces, the cutter is forced harder onto the shoulder of the chuck. Can't wait to give it a go and make the horizontal mill work for its supper. The question is; can I clamp the work down hard enough to resist the cutting forces?

I've also had a good look at the No.1 and No.2 Coventry die grinding fixtures. I see how they work now. There is the odd bit missing, but they can be made if required. Here's the No.1 fixture set up to grind the throat (cutting edge):

coventry_grinding_1.jpg

And to grind the rake:

coventry_grinding_2.jpg

That's enough excitement for one day. This evening I'll make a start on assembling the last of the four rear wheels for my traction engines.

Andrew

Andrew Johnston05/12/2019 16:31:54
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5548 forum posts
650 photos

Good grief, isn't anyone else making anything?

The last rear wheel has now had the spokes fitted and the extra rivet holes drilled in the T-rings, using a spare spoke as a jig:

rear_wheel_drilling_me.jpg

Next job to go round deburring and fitting the spokes permanently before riveting. Then fit the hub covers and job done. And I'll be glad to see the back of the wheels; four front and four rear wheels is enough for anybody.

Andrew

JasonB05/12/2019 17:08:21
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Posted by Andrew Johnston on 05/12/2019 16:31:54:

Good grief, isn't anyone else making anything?

We all post in the workshop progress threadwink

That's a hefty old cutter you have there, should think they have been made almost redundant in industry by the multi insert face and shell cutters, would also allow for running faster with shallower cuts so less chance of pulling your cylinder off the mill's table and still get the job done in the same or less time particularly if you find any hard spots in the casting that your HSS won't like..

Nigel Graham 205/12/2019 17:55:05
665 forum posts
15 photos

Not much time in the workshop today but I added a second coat of paint to parts of the travelling-hoist system I am building for it.

In Rustin's "Direct-To-Rust" very dark green. Not bright yellow! Ooo-er!

Yesterday evening I made the setting-out drawing for cutting two connecting-rods from a piece of 3/4" hot-rolled steel plate - salvaged from the space-taking motor box once on the back of my Harrison lathe's cabinet. Originally I was going to make them from round bar, and indeed started that, but realised that would waste a lot of material simply to give the big-ends' sides finishing-touch radii set by the stock bar!

Tiddleyfying the rectangular versions by radii would be easy enough (turning between centres), but being hidden parts anyway, simple chamfers would be just as neat and effective. Hidden because the engine is totally-enclosed - but I have no way of knowing the original design details anyway.

What does have to look at least reasonably true to original, is all the external details; but even then having only old photographs as a guide, I have to resort to some speculation based on examining Edwardian machinery and old engineering text-books to determine appropriate practice.

Andrew Johnston05/12/2019 22:47:20
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5548 forum posts
650 photos
Posted by JasonB on 05/12/2019 17:08:21:

We all post in the workshop progress threadwink

Well I wouldn't want to sully that thread by posting about fudge it and bodge it stuff. smile

Thus far the iron castings from John Rex have proved to be excellent; no hard spots or skin.However, I will use my insert face mill for the cylinder. In due course I'll test the 6" cutter shown on steel. The horizontal mill has a 5hp motor and I'd like to at least make it sound like it's doing some work. Don't suppose I'll ever have the nerve to stall it though. As far as I'm aware the Clarkson Dedlock system is totally obsolete. Which probably explains why there's been a glut of over-priced arbors on Ebay. I've bought a few cutters from Ebay over the years. One is a half way house - a steel body with HSS serrated inserts.

After a late session today all the spokes on the rear wheel have now been fettled. Riveting here we come!

Andrew

Edited By Andrew Johnston on 05/12/2019 22:48:09

Nigel Graham 206/12/2019 10:25:16
665 forum posts
15 photos

I don't think anyone is "fudging" or "bodging" anything, Andrew, you'll be glad to read! Anyway, anyone who does, is hardly likely to admit it on this site! .

Well, I was going to carry on in the workshop today, erecting the hoist columns I painted over the last couple of days, and emulsioning the walls. Unfortunately pains in my replaced knees mean I overdid things a bit previously, re-arranging the home. So a day or rest from physical labours - but I can get on with designing my engine's cylinders, or the hoist's travelling-beam and crab.

I'm making the compound cylinders from a rectangular cast-iron block with fabricated valve-chests, also CI. I've arrived at an outline reasonably compatible with the photos and contemporary practice observed on a few preserved Hindley stationary-engines. For I have no drawings for this thing, and the engine is an enclosed inverted-vertical compound placed between the crew seats, so nearly as highly visible as an over-type engine.

To make it more fun, Hindleys, the original builders, kept changing details on their under-type and vertical-engine wagons, so the pictures show no one exactly matching another. When I started the project too many years ago this held me up for a long time because the outline drawing using trade-review dimensions and scaling the accompanying broadside and front photos, was all out of proportion. Only when further photos came to light, did I realise the vehicle photographed for that Commercial Motor magazine review was not the specimen actually described.

It helped me greatly to find some very old engineering text-books to give me general details and proportions of machine details typical of the time. The NTET reprint of an Edwardian manual for steam road vehicle owners and drivers, for example, showed me the principles I needed for the front axle with Ackermann steering, and rear axle with a chain-driven differential. The photos vaguely showed enough of the front to get the assembly looking right (including vertical king-pins, not good practice but that of the Bourton works); but none showed the rear axle.

Quite a few model-engineers with greater experience than mine but whose own engines are from published, proven designs and usually of prototypes still existing in the steel, gravely shook their heads and pronounced it very brave to embark on an ambitious project to model an extinct vehicle from merely a few old publicity photos. trade reviews and two patent specifications! I do not claim it is an "exact" replica of a specific vehicle because that is impossible in this case. I aim to build it as well as I can, and as faithfully as possible to the North Dorset firm who built the originals, and to the design practices of their time. When I started, some of my fellow club members joked some nonagenarian will take one look and say, "That's not right: I remember five bolts, not six, on that bit!". No chance of that now, Hindley may have later used seven bolts, and it won't give the modern rivet-counters an excuse either.

''''

And whilst in indoor mode, not forgetting starting the Christmas cards: two have to go abroad!

Brian H07/12/2019 22:23:13
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1671 forum posts
109 photos

Had my first play with my Tom Senior Major Mk2. Used a 0.040 slitting saw to slice pieces of 1/4" thick gunmetal from a block so that I can make some eccentric straps. Even managed to use the power feed.

Very pleased!

Brian

Lainchy07/12/2019 22:55:01
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246 forum posts
95 photos

20191207_163726.jpg

Today... I worked at Claymills Victorian pumping station, refitting a parallel motion drop link. VERY enjoyable.

Meunier08/12/2019 19:54:17
323 forum posts
1 photos

Posted by Andrew Johnston on 05/12/2019 16:31:54:

Good grief, isn't anyone else making anything?

dedlock_cutter.jpg

I think we are all still stunned at your T-slot cutter.

DaveD

Nigel Graham 208/12/2019 21:22:04
665 forum posts
15 photos

Lainchy -

I can concur with the satisfaction. I have not worked on massive steam engines but in the 1980s did help a friend restore an intact but neglected water-mill to full working order, and from animal-feeds to baking-flour production.

Projects like that are full of challenges, puzzles and unexpected problems to solve!

I must put Claymills on my "to-visit" list!

Oldiron08/12/2019 21:34:53
450 forum posts
22 photos
Posted by Lainchy on 07/12/2019 22:55:01:

Today... I worked at Claymills Victorian pumping station, refitting a parallel motion drop link. VERY enjoyable.

You appear to have the correct tools for work of that size. ie A big set of Stillsons and a 2Lb Hammer and an Abom sized spanner.

Look like a beast of an engine. Probably similar in size to the 4 at Abbey pumping station in Leicester.

regards

Lainchy08/12/2019 21:47:01
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246 forum posts
95 photos
Posted by Oldiron on 08/12/2019 21:34:53:
Posted by Lainchy on 07/12/2019 22:55:01:

Today... I worked at Claymills Victorian pumping station, refitting a parallel motion drop link. VERY enjoyable.

You appear to have the correct tools for work of that size. ie A big set of Stillsons and a 2Lb Hammer and an Abom sized spanner.

Look like a beast of an engine. Probably similar in size to the 4 at Abbey pumping station in Leicester.

regards

They are indeed very similar to Abbey Road Oldiron.... They are the 4 Gimsons at Claymills Victorian Pumping Station at Burton. Only been volunteering there since Oct I guess, but learning loads!

This engine - A Engine - is currently being restored to steam. When complete, all 4 beams will be working. B,C and D are all running.

Great fun

Lainchy08/12/2019 21:50:17
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246 forum posts
95 photos
Posted by Nigel Graham 2 on 08/12/2019 21:22:04:

Lainchy -

I can concur with the satisfaction. I have not worked on massive steam engines but in the 1980s did help a friend restore an intact but neglected water-mill to full working order, and from animal-feeds to baking-flour production.

Projects like that are full of challenges, puzzles and unexpected problems to solve!

I must put Claymills on my "to-visit" list!

Well worth a visit Nigel, First steaming of 2020 will be near the end of Feb. I'm booked to be stoking

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