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What Did You Do Today 2019

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mechman4827/10/2019 17:58:17
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2581 forum posts
392 photos

Yesterday actually; was continuing on with the cylinder block for my beam engine, tapping out M2 for valve chest studs & snapped tap angry fortunately it was the last hole, & it snapped off a couple of mil above the top face so managed to remove broken end, 'Oh dear, how sad, never mind', luckily have another set of taps. Must remember to go easy on the small sizes thinking

George.

Emgee29/10/2019 08:51:20
1397 forum posts
212 photos

Started off searching this forum for the thread about Johansson being the source name of Jo blocks, no luck finding it but did come across a reply from Jason within this thread that seemed to ring a bell.

So took a picture of my Digital Caliper made by CE Johansson in Sweden, bought it back in the 1980's from MESAS at an ME exhibition, it was very expensive at that time, I think £70 so it can be seen what good value tools are today.
I also have a Mitutoyo which I have been using for the past 25 years so the Johansson can now go to work again with a new battery fitted, I had removed the old battery when laying it up.

You may notice 1 of the jaws has been machined and the other jaw has a dimple drilled in, that was when the caliper was used as a height gauge,

Emgee

.johansson digital caliper.jpg

Nicholas Farr01/11/2019 08:48:54
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2109 forum posts
1020 photos

Hi, yesterday evening, I cobbled together this TV aerial bracket onto a worn out 4" conveyor belt return roller bearing and hub, in order to trim it down, while keeping it reasonable true so as to make a smaller roller of a similar type.

bearing and hub.jpg

First of all the bulk of it was cut away with a parting tool and it was then turned to size to fit onto a smaller piece of tube. One for the other end is yet to be done in the same way.

Regards Nick.

Watford01/11/2019 08:57:34
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120 forum posts
10 photos

What was someone saying about chuck guards?!?!?

M

tractionengine4201/11/2019 09:47:56
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365 forum posts
105 photos

Continued my 5"g LION build series bending up the throat plate, proved to be a challenge to get good tight corners.

The previously flanged material pulled in at the sides so I learnt the lesson that I should have made an allowance when I made the blank ready for flanging and should have left some additional material at the sides. However, because the the sides are right up to the flange and the flange blends into the corner radius the width of contact for silver soldering remains pretty much constant, so it looks like I got away with that one.

For anyone interested in following my build here's this particular video: Bending the Throat Plate

throat plate 2.jpg

Mick B101/11/2019 11:32:06
1426 forum posts
77 photos

More scrollsaw birds - a paddling copper flamingo and a brontornis burmeisteri.

The actual latter bird was 2.8M tall and weighed maybe 400 kg. You wouldn't want to meet him on the Miocene Patagonian plains without at least your .375" H&H.

img_3519.jpg

img_3514.jpg

Sooner or later I'll get over this temporary obsession and do some proper engineering again...surprise

Edited By Mick B1 on 01/11/2019 11:33:50

Hillclimber01/11/2019 18:06:21
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159 forum posts
37 photos

Finally finished this little GH Thomas tool height gauge today.

Quite over-engineered, really. But a happy experience with this kit from Hemingway. And in fact the first time I have worked with a raw casting, or turned a thread. So worthwhile, as well as necessary.

Cheers, Colin

img_6313.jpg

Ian Johnson 101/11/2019 23:43:06
234 forum posts
68 photos
Posted by Emgee on 29/10/2019 08:51:20:

Started off searching this forum for the thread about Johansson being the source name of Jo blocks, no luck finding it but did come across a reply from Jason within this thread that seemed to ring a bell.

So took a picture of my Digital Caliper made by CE Johansson in Sweden, bought it back in the 1980's from MESAS at an ME exhibition, it was very expensive at that time, I think £70 so it can be seen what good value tools are today.
I also have a Mitutoyo which I have been using for the past 25 years so the Johansson can now go to work again with a new battery fitted, I had removed the old battery when laying it up.

You may notice 1 of the jaws has been machined and the other jaw has a dimple drilled in, that was when the caliper was used as a height gauge,

Emgee

.johansson digital caliper.jpg

My thread 'the wonderful world of gauge blocks' had a few comments about Johansson or Jo blocks if that's any help?

MESAS that's where I got my Hobbymat lathe and mill from in the eighties, still got it in the shed somewhere.

Ian

Neil Wyatt02/11/2019 11:44:20
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Moderator
17314 forum posts
690 photos
77 articles
Posted by Hillclimber on 01/11/2019 18:06:21:

Finally finished this little GH Thomas tool height gauge today.

Quite over-engineered, really. But a happy experience with this kit from Hemingway. And in fact the first time I have worked with a raw casting, or turned a thread. So worthwhile, as well as necessary.

Cheers, Colin

img_6313.jpg

Colin, did you take any in-progress photos?

If so a short write up for MEW would be on interest.

Neil

Hillclimber02/11/2019 14:00:05
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159 forum posts
37 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 02/11/2019 11:44:20:
Posted by Hillclimber on 01/11/2019 18:06:21:

Finally finished this little GH Thomas tool height gauge today.

Colin, did you take any in-progress photos?

If so a short write up for MEW would be on interest.

Neil

Neil, sadly I did not take pics on the way. Which is strange, because I usually do.

So I asked myself why not and concluded because it had been something I 'needed' rather than something I was 'making'. It didn't become the latter until now, when it is made! Sounds strange perhaps, but I guess I didn't impart any emotional value until it was complete...

Other reason, I think is that I was following the excellent Hemingway instructions, along with the original GHT article. The only issues I had with these were the cursory description of silver-soldering in the two blades. I made a little jig to hold them perpendicular from the offcuts to do that, by reaming a 5/16" hole in the casting stub and sticking the offcut from main shaft into it. And I think they say something like 'the thumbscrews need no comment'. Well they did for me, with a little thought on how to thread as much of their length as possible.

Cheers, Colin

Andrew Johnston02/11/2019 19:46:15
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5178 forum posts
599 photos

Among other things I finally got the overarm on the horizontal mill shifted from this:

hm1.jpg

To this:

hm2.jpg

It maInly involved BF and BI, ie, hitting it with a copper hammer. Once I'd got the arm moved 8" or so, plus copious amounts of oil on the dovetails, I could move the overarm all the way in and out simply by pushing on it. Which is where I was 10 years ago. Must remember to exercise it now and again and add oil. The reason for moving the overarm back is so I can use the face mill shown to start roughing out the cylinder castings on my traction engine without said overarm getting in the way. The face mill may look small, but it is 80mm diameter.

I might even get around to fitting, and trying out, the vertical head for the mill I bought years ago on Ebay:

hm_vertical_head.jpg

That's a 12" rule against the head. The main issue is working out how I'm going to lift the vertical head onto the mill table without involving a trip to A&E. When I bought the head I lifted it from the car boot to where it is now. But that was years ago, no way I can just pick it up and lift it now. sad

Andrew

Mark Rand02/11/2019 21:50:36
854 forum posts

If you ever get the ram off, take the opportunity to install a few oil nipples, so you can jack the surfaces apart and make everything slide easily.

I pottered out to the shed and did some tidying up. It had got back to the point where I couldn't continue any of the current jobs because I couldn't move anywhere crying.

As a result of this, I've collected up most of the magnets liberated from hard drives when I disassembled them to make foundry stock. If anyone has any suggestions for a use for them, or even wants them, the shed would appreciate the extra space!

Nigel McBurney 102/11/2019 22:59:19
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660 forum posts
3 photos

Andrew those 2 Es are nice machines,watch out when you go to get one of your files from the wall clips,dont come up quick and bang your head under the mill overarm sticking out the back,I found that the vertical head gets heavier as you get older,I used to get my mate to help me lift it,they can be lifted with an engine crane,Adcocks should have built in a lifting arm and a parking place for the head on the mill column like some manufacturers did. At least with a head like that and a 40 int spindle ,some really decent cuts can be taken with end mills ,and facing cutters,we were going to downsize so I passed on the mill to a friend,then the house sale fell through ,I will never get rid of anything in future unless the sale documentation is completed.

Nicholas Farr05/11/2019 21:19:37
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2109 forum posts
1020 photos

Hi, I had a little time to do a bit more on my roller with the reclaimed hubs and bearings. I cut and trimmed a piece of tube to length and fitted and welded the hubs/bearings in place.

welded into roller.jpg

They were then dressed using a flap disc and spray painted with a Zinc paint rattle can.

dressed and painted.jpg

Then I faced up the ends of a piece of 25mm EN8 round to length and cut in a circlip groove 30mm from each end, this being the new shaft for the roller.

newe roller shaft.jpg

groove and circlip.jpg

Just need to mill a couple of flats on each end and it will be ready to assemble.

Regards Nick.

Edited By Nicholas Farr on 05/11/2019 21:22:10

Neil Wyatt05/11/2019 21:49:18
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Moderator
17314 forum posts
690 photos
77 articles
Posted by Hillclimber on 02/11/2019 14:00:05:
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 02/11/2019 11:44:20:
Posted by Hillclimber on 01/11/2019 18:06:21:

Finally finished this little GH Thomas tool height gauge today.

Colin, did you take any in-progress photos?

If so a short write up for MEW would be on interest.

Neil

Neil, sadly I did not take pics on the way. Which is strange, because I usually do.

So I asked myself why not and concluded because it had been something I 'needed' rather than something I was 'making'. It didn't become the latter until now, when it is made! Sounds strange perhaps, but I guess I didn't impart any emotional value until it was complete...

Other reason, I think is that I was following the excellent Hemingway instructions, along with the original GHT article. The only issues I had with these were the cursory description of silver-soldering in the two blades. I made a little jig to hold them perpendicular from the offcuts to do that, by reaming a 5/16" hole in the casting stub and sticking the offcut from main shaft into it. And I think they say something like 'the thumbscrews need no comment'. Well they did for me, with a little thought on how to thread as much of their length as possible.

Cheers, Colin

Oh well - but a short review and pics of the finished article might still be worth doing? Drop me an email if interested.

If anyone reading this makes any workshop tooling kits, do consider documenting it!

Neil

Martin Kyte06/11/2019 13:13:49
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1642 forum posts
24 photos

For those interested in trams.

Rebuilt tram at Ipswich Museum

regards Martin

Nicholas Farr07/11/2019 22:34:52
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2109 forum posts
1020 photos

Hi, I milled the flats on the ends of the shaft for my new roller. First side was set up on "V" blocks.

milled flats 1.jpg

The second side was set up on my 1-2-3 blocks on the first side flats.

milled flats 2.jpg

The shaft was then fitted into the roller and then put onto the machine that I've been making it for.

roller in machine.jpg

This is a tumbling machine that was scrapped by the company I used to work for several years ago now, but I had to remove the motor that was on it first, and fit it to another different type of machine. The original roller and any drums that were used on it, had been missing for quite some time. So for a trial run I've used an empty 5L emulsion paint plastic pot and filled it just above half way with some dry sand and put in a few rusty wheel castings.

trial run.jpg

I gave it a run for about 15 minuets and although it wasn't ideal, as there are no baffles to make the sand and wheels tumble properly, but it did drive OK and cleaned the wheels slightly. Just need to buy or make a proper barrel.

rusty wheels 2.jpg

Regards Nick.

Edited By Nicholas Farr on 07/11/2019 22:41:22

colin brannigan08/11/2019 08:24:59
68 forum posts
12 photos

That looks an interesting project Nick please keep us informed of further developments.

Cheers Colin

IanT08/11/2019 09:09:01
1432 forum posts
141 photos
Posted by Nigel McBurney 1 on 02/11/2019 22:59:19:

Andrew those 2 Es are nice machines,watch out when you go to get one of your files from the wall clips,dont come up quick and bang your head under the mill overarm sticking out the back

I found that the vertical head gets heavier as you get older,I used to get my mate to help me lift it,they can be lifted with an engine crane

Andrew/Nigel - The overarm on my Victoria tends to be mostly parked at the back and I've lost count of the times I've come up under it and banged my head. It now has a towel wrapped & tied around it and whilst I still occasionally hit it, it's not nearly so painful...

I use a very simple A-frame with pulleys to lift heavy things up and down in my workshop. No wheels, it gets moved to where I need it and assembled in-situ. I couldn't get an engine frame in the spaces available. Mine is made from doubled-up Dexion and cost nothing. Stores flat against the wall. It was a temporary solution that has served me well over many years now. Quite safe provided you don't go daft.

My vertical head is also very heavy but gets put on/off in two stages. One is the lift to the table, the other the lift to the bolting position. The A-frame lifts it to the table but I have an MT3 'dummy' (fits into the heads mandrel) on the table and then it's simple to use the table to hold and position the head using the knee & table controls. I'd do myself serious damage if I had to hold the head up whilst trying to get the bolts in place otherwise...

Regards,

IanT

Phil Whitley08/11/2019 20:31:00
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1057 forum posts
137 photos

Today I lit my forge for the first time, filled the workshop with smoke, set the CO detector off, and had to open all the doors and windows, but it was fun! Some mods to the flue system are needed! However, the Bosh is full and I added a bottle of CH leaksealer to be on the safe side, and no leaks! big relief. I have it on video and will post up a link to it when I upload it.

Phil

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