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What Did You Do Today 2019

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roy entwistle27/06/2019 08:45:34
1056 forum posts

Mark

Before you start using a chisel, try using vinegar first. Depends on the glue

Roy

Nigel Graham 227/06/2019 21:25:32
437 forum posts

First physio session at the hospital this morning, then after a gentle afternoon trimming some of the triffids taking over my, err, garden, decided to resume work on the Worden Tool-grinder (Hemingway kit).

Decided which bits to make next - then found I don't have the necessary reamer. Right, plenty of other bits to choose. Collected the tools, metal and drawing (in a plastic folder) together, then stopped for tea.

After which I thought I may as well set up the lathe and make sure I can sit at it on a disability-aids stool... and one thing led to another. Before I knew it and I decided to call it a night, I had scattered swarf all over the shop and completed the first stage of Part 32.

First machining since my operation, was that.

Andrew Johnston28/06/2019 11:29:52
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4935 forum posts
560 photos

Well, yesterday to be fair. Bent the hot rolled angle to make the rear wheel anchors for my traction engine:

anchor.jpg

The material is 5mm thick so bending was done hot. The cutting nozzle on the oxy-acetylene set worked a treat for heating; just remember not to operate the cutting oxygen supply! The anchors are deliberately left rough to simulate the fact that in full size they would have been made by the blacksmith. smile

Also knocked out the anchor bolts and frost spikes:

anchors_boits_frost_spikes.jpg

For scale the shanks are 3/8". The anchors bolts were entirely done on the repetition lathe, all with HSS toolbits. The frost spikes were roughed out on the repetition lathe, but the tapered end was done on the centre lathe using the top slide and one pass. The rounded end was done with a file.

Next job is to machine the rectangular slots in both parts for the keys that keep them in place.

Andrew

Edited By Andrew Johnston on 28/06/2019 11:34:22

JasonB28/06/2019 12:08:06
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16525 forum posts
1756 photos
1 articles

Looking good Andrew, shanks are thicker than I would have though and quite a bit more than what my Fowler would scale up to at 1/4" dia for a 4" engine.

Will you use the CNC for the slots as that would save a lot of handle winding?

Andrew Johnston28/06/2019 12:37:51
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4935 forum posts
560 photos
Posted by JasonB on 28/06/2019 12:08:06:

............shanks are thicker than I would have though............

The shank diameter was scaled from a Burrell drawing in the book by Gilbert, showing an anchor bolt with a shank diameter of 1-1/8".

The current plan is to drill and mill the slots on the CNC mill and then square up the ends with a keyway broach. The 1/8" keyway broach in my set from Shars has a body that is a few thou wider than 1/8". I don't really want to modify it as it will then be a loose fit on the guides. The 1/8" broach from RDG looks like it is plain parallel, so I intend to buy one, fingers crossed. If the body does turn out to be wider I'll "adjust" it on the surface grinder.

Andrew

mechman4828/06/2019 13:29:06
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2518 forum posts
377 photos

Modified the compound slide lock on my WM250V-F ...

cross slide lock mod.jpg

Started collecting material for my next project … Single cylinder balance beam engine from a design by Gerry Dykstra,Holland.

Beam engine parts1.jpg

George.

Jim Nic28/06/2019 15:15:16
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213 forum posts
111 photos

I like the slide lock George. I'll be making one of them soon.

Jim

Iain Downs28/06/2019 18:40:57
515 forum posts
397 photos

Well, not today, exactly.

On Tuesday, I ordered a FEMI SN 105XL. regular readers will recall I blew up my Lidl chop grinder thing and all of you said, 'Buy a Femi'. So I did.

I wasn't sure about timing, but the joy of me being employed again (and apparently only working 2/3rds the hours for the same pay) softened the good lady to the point where she agreed that it was a good 'new job' present!

Not only that, she's also given the nod to a small shed for the recycling. You would not BELIEVE how much plastic and card waste (I blame Amazon for the second part) we amass in a couple of weeks and, of course, it needs to live in MY shed! I'm forced to take it to the tip when I can no longer stand in front of my machines .

But now!!! Well, soon. I've also finally cleared out my book store (they're all scanned now!) and have moved some of the shed storage into there. So at the moment, there is NOTHING under my main bench. Thinking of putting some shelving in for the new saw and the next unnecessary, expensive and bulky purchase.

But that won't be for a while. You need to manage your favours wisely...

The saw was interesting. The first thing I notices was that the instruction book is largely cartoons. Personally, I read rather than watch so I didn't find this helpful. Moreover, I'd foolishly watched you tube videos on Femi Saws and thought the belt tensions had a 'clack' when the tension was right. Apparently not with this one.

So my first attempt at a cut was a mess. I'd tightened it up as far as my feeble muscles would allow with no clack and set off on my first cut. it produced black swarf. Odd for mild steel.

A bit of investigation showed that the blade had moved forward and cut into the inside of the back cover (black paint and a bit of mild steel).

Stakesys were very helpful and kindly didn't point out I was an idiot. Apparently, you have to adjust the tension by 'feel' - something the cartoon drawers clearly had a challenge on finding the right emojis for.

But my first real cut was a 50mm mild steel bar. It was quiet compared to the chop grinder. No sparks. No ridiculous amounts of grit in my lungs and eyes. The first cut was a bit slow - apparently you need to run the thing (blade?) in.

next cuts were 25mm aluminium and knife and butter spring to mind. Then a cut 1mm further in - a nice thin slice of metal.

The finish is a good deal better than I get from my mill and I suspect it squarer as well (in defence, the CMD10 is not the most precise machine in the world and nor is it's handle turner).

So I'm looking forward to my first real uses of the saw and of dreaming which once-a-year machinery I can now buy and store in the void which is now under my bench!

Iain

Nigel Graham 230/06/2019 23:53:19
437 forum posts

I think I over-did things a bit yesterday, with some garden trimming as well half-sitting, half-standing at the lathe, so took things a bit gentler today.

So, after a slow morning, a very satisfactory hour screw-cutting the 3/8" BSB thread on the end of the cam-shaft on the Worden tool-grinder. It took a lot of patient tickling of both threads, both 1/1/4 " long, to make them work together satisfactorily, but that's another step forwards. And I didn't use a die! The tool was an insert type, bought from JB.

It took me a while to find the thread depth. The Brass Thread series isn't in my model-engineering references, but luckily I found the very close Cycle Thread series in a set of very old professional engineers' data-sheets I'd inherited from Dad. (BSB: 55º; BSC 60º, and fine enough at 26tpi for negligible depth difference.)

(Hemingway do like a variety of metric and Imperial measurements and threads on their kit plans, spiced with mixing vulgar and decimal fractions. One drawing instructs you to reduce two M5 X 25mm grub-screws to something-thirtytooths-inch long each, and turn a spigot on one of them, 4mm dia X some-bits-of-inches. It would have been more to the point to quote all of the inch-dimensions in decimals, since almost all of the work is turning and milling.)

'

Rewarded myself with dinner in my local pub. Massive serving - fish, chips (fried spud wedges rather than chip-shaped chips) plus peas and salad. I'm afraid the chips defeated me but I ate all the greens so decided I could still have ice-cream for pudding. Browsed the latest copy of ME while waiting for that lot to settle, helped by a pint of RNLI Ale, brewed specially to celebrate Weymouth Lifeboat Station's centenary.. by Marstons, in Burton-on-Trent, about as far from the sea as you can be in England!

'

That was me wrecked for the afternoon apart from another session of gentle physiotherapy exercises, but I managed another hour or so in the evening starting on another two grinder components. I don't know what that "pre-loved" steel presently in the lathe actually is, but EN1A leaded, it certainly isn't!

Setting up the steady on it was problematical. This too was pre-loved, so loved it has lost two of its original screws and one of its original nuts. Which all adds to the frustrating confection of other nut sizes on this Myford 7's accessories; like the bought-new rear tool-post's ISO-M main stud and Whitworth T-bolt nuts. Then I had to reverse the fingers to fit over that billet, meaning some judicious filing of the back end and slot on one of them so it would retract sufficiently. The non-original fittings on the other two allowed straight reversal!

'

Also found help to solve a strange TurboCAD problem that had had me on the verge of giving up CAD for ever. I'd unknowingly switched off one of the many obscure and unintuitive controls that infest the programme.

Mark Rand02/07/2019 21:02:33
798 forum posts

Almost finished the overhaul of the Royal 10" shaper. Ways re-aligned and re-scraped, yoke pivot pin re-made, cleaned up. Just waiting for some BSF screws and nuts to replace missing ones and to replace the T&E mains cable that it came with.

It doesn't rattle when the ram changes direction any more!

The plan was to put it on Adam Stevenson's site because I desperately need the space and have a mill and slotting head, but I'm almost tempted to keep it now.

I bear no responsibility for the paint job though...

Anthony Knights02/07/2019 22:13:27
287 forum posts
109 photos

The long table for my mini mill/drill arrived today. Now fitted and adjusted. I used new hex headed gib screws instead of the existing slotted ones. I find them easier to adjust.new table.jpg

I'm not sure what to do with the old table. I did think about using it as a new cross slide on the lathe, but that could be problematical. I've temporarily fitted it to my home brew tool grinder to see if it's usable there.grind1.jpg

edited for spelling (i have a dyslexic keyboard)

Edited By Anthony Knights on 02/07/2019 22:15:16

thaiguzzi03/07/2019 05:30:00
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597 forum posts
131 photos
Posted by Mark Rand on 02/07/2019 21:02:33:

Almost finished the overhaul of the Royal 10" shaper. Ways re-aligned and re-scraped, yoke pivot pin re-made, cleaned up. Just waiting for some BSF screws and nuts to replace missing ones and to replace the T&E mains cable that it came with.

It doesn't rattle when the ram changes direction any more!

The plan was to put it on Adam Stevenson's site because I desperately need the space and have a mill and slotting head, but I'm almost tempted to keep it now.

I bear no responsibility for the paint job though...

Mark, noooooooooo.

If you don't need the money, you'll find the space.

That is one of the later Royal (Alba/Elliot) shapers with the box table front support.

Think of cheap gear cutting, splines and marvelous finishes.

Sell the slotting head.......devil

Martin King 203/07/2019 11:07:34
626 forum posts
236 photos

Hi All,

Today (& yesterday!) I got stuck into the old rusty telescope mount that i got last week:

dividing 2.jpg

Managed to get it apart with no damage and now it looks like this:

mount 1.jpg

mount 3.jpg

mount 4.jpg

Ther is one sheared off screw and it looks to me like it is missing a couple of hand wheels for adjusting the worm gears. Anyone got an idea of how big a diameter these should be as there is quite a bit of friction in the gears?

Quite a fun little project to do while sitting under a brolly in the sun!

As you may tell from the colour it is for a MYFORD telescope! laugh

Cheers, Martin

Nigel Graham 203/07/2019 11:41:20
437 forum posts

Looks good!

I am not an expert on telescope mounting but worm-drives like that, too low-angled to reverse under load, should operate silkily-smoothly without much effort and very little actual friction in them, the bearings and when released, in those spindle locks.

Assuming the bearings and locks are all up to scratch, and everything clean and lightly oiled; heavy friction suggests to me the worms are very slightly too deeply meshed. You might find a thou' or two relaxation in the way the bearings are fitted to the frame though. They appear not to have very positive locations, e.g. sliding in rebates on the frame; but rely simply on 4 chees-head screws. The two lugs holding the elevation worm particularly, look a bit out-of-place with the rest of the mount, as if replacements made by a previous owner, and not too accurately.

Short of someone giving more definite information, perhaps by comparing with another mount of similar size, I'd suggest completing the overhaul of what's there, fitting the telescope or an equivalent dummy load, then experimenting with a temporary handle to ascertain a suitable radius before make ones that do the rest justice.

I'd think hand-wheels or cranked handles, possibly no more than about 2" radius.

The limit looks anyway as if set by clearances between the handles and other parts of the frame.

Martin King 203/07/2019 12:24:54
626 forum posts
236 photos

Nigel, The worm gears turn smoothly when operated with a small mole grip on the spindle to use as a handle and feel good with no binding or rough spots so the engineering is not too far out. There are no bearing in the supports which I found a bit odd.

I should add that I have no interest in using this item, I have just cleaned it up to move it on.I may make a coiuple of hand wheels though?

Cheers, Martin

Richard -03/07/2019 17:00:03
47 forum posts
7 photos

Cut an S20x2 internal buttress thread for a new drawbar for the George Alexander (Deckel) feeling pleased with myself!!!

mechman4803/07/2019 18:53:58
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2518 forum posts
377 photos

Recovering from Kidney stent removal on Tuesday; managed to mow front & back grass ( Lawn … dont know ) with help of SWMBO, grand lass she is. Received package containing assorted size 2 / 2.5 / 3mm cheese hd / socket hd set screws to 99 % finalise material collection ( & stock up ) for next project, still need to find / make 8 spoked flywheel, looked on 't'internet' but only seem to find 4 spoked ones … any one know of a supplier that has 8 spoked fly wheels? 3" od x 1/2" width, or 75 x 12mm ?

George.

V8Eng03/07/2019 20:19:21
1324 forum posts
28 photos
Posted by mechman48 on 03/07/2019 18:53:58:

any one know of a supplier that has 8 spoked fly wheels? 3" od x 1/2" width, or 75 x 12mm ?

George.

 

 

If you are able to compromise on 6 spoke I think that is a standard Stuart Models size. RDG also do a 6 spoke one pretty close to your requirements.

pleased to hear that your health is improving.

V8.

Edited By V8Eng on 03/07/2019 20:19:49

Edited By V8Eng on 03/07/2019 20:23:09

Boiler Bri03/07/2019 20:48:30
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810 forum posts
285 photos

Martin. I like your telescope mount. I could do with borrowing that for a couple of hours to measure it up 😉😉

Brian

Neil Wyatt03/07/2019 22:12:49
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Moderator
16740 forum posts
689 photos
76 articles
Posted by Martin King 2 on 03/07/2019 11:07:34:

Hi All,

Today (& yesterday!) I got stuck into the old rusty telescope mount that i got last week:

dividing 2.jpg

Managed to get it apart with no damage and now it looks like this:

mount 1.jpg

mount 3.jpg

mount 4.jpg

Ther is one sheared off screw and it looks to me like it is missing a couple of hand wheels for adjusting the worm gears. Anyone got an idea of how big a diameter these should be as there is quite a bit of friction in the gears?

Quite a fun little project to do while sitting under a brolly in the sun!

As you may tell from the colour it is for a MYFORD telescope! laugh

Cheers, Martin

Hi Martin - have the gears turned out to be brass? If so, that's a big plus.

The knobs would normally be turned by flexible drives (spring in a plastic tube) about 8-10" long with knobs about 1 1/2" diameter on the end. This is to stop your hands shaking the mount.

Brian, if you make one, consider using bearings, ideally taper roller for the main axes, but also ordinary races for the worms.

Neil

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