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What Did You Do Today 2019

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Colin Heseltine03/06/2019 16:45:40
336 forum posts
82 photos

Finished making 14 'T' nuts to fit Gate PBM-2000 (Bridgeport clone).

7 with M12 threads so as to use the clamp kit from previous mill.

4 with M8 and 3 with M6 threads for holding any other bits.

Colin

JasonB04/06/2019 16:03:09
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Moderator
16446 forum posts
1739 photos
1 articles

Before this thread turns into a CAD thread can I ask that no more posts be made on the subject and I will move all the posts in the last day to a new thread where the discussion can continue.

J

Edited By JasonB on 04/06/2019 16:15:55

Nicholas Farr06/06/2019 21:50:22
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1992 forum posts
950 photos

Hi, it's been this week really, put a couple of top coats of paint on my milling machine stand and fitted the adjustable machine mounts, then fitted the milling machine into position. The green paint isn't a exact match, but it is very close enough for me and although it's no showroom paint job, it will stop the stand turning to rust.

major and stand.jpg

After giving it a bit of oil here and there, I raised the head up to it's maximum to make sure that I had positioned the stand the correct distance away from the wall behind it so there was clearance between the belt guard and the sloping ceiling.

headroom clearance.jpg

This proved to be OK, not that it is likely to be used at full height often. Just need to fit the DRO's and it will be ready for use.

Regards Nick.

Michael Gilligan07/06/2019 07:22:32
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14135 forum posts
615 photos

A bad start to the day: I read this ... **LINK**

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-48551452?xtor=ES-208-%5B23310_NEWS_NLB_ACT_Wk23_Friday_7_June%5D-20190607-%5BDr+John+has+died+aged+77%5D

MichaelG.

.

P.S. ... Before the whingers start:

Yes, I know it's got nowt to do with 'Model Engineering' [sic] ... that's why I posted it on this 'Tea Room' thread.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 07/06/2019 07:24:48

Pete Berry07/06/2019 07:55:43
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24 forum posts
7 photos

Needed to replace the variable speed drive belt on my raglan little john lathe. Found a replacement on the web at a cost of £70-00. I don't like to be ripped off so started contacting various suppliers to no avail, either they did not come back with answers or were unhelpful. I finally contacted George Lodge & sons ltd and talked to Dave Fuller who was most helpfully and obviously new his stuff! And was able to supply the correct belt (VSB 22 x 8 x 725) @ £33-00

Belt now fitted and running well. It's nice when someone takes the trouble to help.

Boiler Bri08/06/2019 05:21:44
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806 forum posts
285 photos

I made a start on the hydrostatic lubrication today.

New tanks made from 316stst.

wxdd7787.jpg

Whilst i was at it i decided to draw up the parts to check they all fit.

hydrostatic.jpg

I should have more control over the oil flow rate with this system. The original mechanical ones chuck out too much oil and the tanks on them are small.

Bri

Mark Rand08/06/2019 11:34:52
785 forum posts

TIG welded tanks and nipples?

Boiler Bri08/06/2019 18:12:34
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806 forum posts
285 photos

Hi Mark

Yep all tig welded.

I am sure my boiler inspector will have something to say!

Bri

Joseph Noci 108/06/2019 19:46:19
543 forum posts
832 photos

Posted by Boiler Bri on 08/06/2019 05:21:44:

I made a start on the hydrostatic lubrication today.

New tanks made from 316stst.

Forgive my ignorance...What are those tanks used for?

You said :

Yep all tig welded.

I am sure my boiler inspector will have something to say!

Are the tanks boilers? If not boilers, are you saying they have have hot water in them somehow?

Interested to know how you tigged them. Did you fill/purge with Argon when welding?

Maybe you are coded in SS welding, but if not , there are many pitfalls in welding stainless that is exposed to hot water. The tanks must be back-filled with gas, and weld temps must be very well controlled to prevent carbon precipitation. Else those become rust focus points, and the tank turns becomes a sieve..Ask how I know..

Joe

Speedy Builder508/06/2019 20:02:19
1833 forum posts
128 photos

Nick, regarding the belt cover and proximity to the slope of the ceiling, I have an older model of this mill/drill and cut the back end of the belt guard off, just behind the rear clips to allow the guard to be removed when the head is at max height.

Danny M2Z10/06/2019 06:14:38
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745 forum posts
278 photos

Today I commenced to manufacture some scoring gauges for measuring holes in targets for a friend at the local club. The gauges are made with a collar of precisely the projectile diameter to assist with determining the final score for competitors.

The rules state that the gauge should be ± 0.001" but as my friend had donated 5 offcuts of 15mm x 1m and 2 of 25mm x 1m brass rod towards the M2Z workshop I decided to make them as accurately as possible with my C3 mini-lathe.

First was to decide the machining sequence so decided to offset the topslide by 10° and cut the taper. Next step was to machine the measuring collar accurately to size so with a freshly sharpened and honed HSS tool the rimfire gauge was turned to 0.2243" diameter.

Next step was to remove the 0.0003" by using wet&dry paper wrapped around a small file and remembering an old trick I planned to annoint the wet&dry with a few drops of metal polish.

So picked up the ancient bottle of 'Silvo', gave it one shake and the bottle disintegrated. The plastic failed right where the surface of the contents reached the sides. Most unusual.

Anyway, the first gauge was finished to size using a bit of kero on the wet&dry and now mikes at 0.2240" across the important bit (the collar) with a Moore & Wright micrometer.

* Danny M *

silvo bottle.jpg

rimfire scoring gauge.jpg

Michael Gilligan10/06/2019 07:23:48
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14135 forum posts
615 photos
Posted by Danny M2Z on 10/06/2019 06:14:38:

... So picked up the ancient bottle of 'Silvo', gave it one shake and the bottle disintegrated. The plastic failed right where the surface of the contents reached the sides. Most unusual.

silvo bottle.jpg

.

Great result, Danny yes

But; from this side of the planet, that looks remarkably like a steel can

MichaelG.

Michael Gilligan10/06/2019 08:17:09
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14135 forum posts
615 photos

Just received an eMail from Screwfix, which made me chuckle

... it's promoting the Milwaukee range of ONE-KEY tools !!

MichaelG.

Danny M2Z11/06/2019 00:49:58
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745 forum posts
278 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 10/06/2019 07:23:48:

Great result, Danny yes

But; from this side of the planet, that looks remarkably like a steel can

MichaelG.

Michael. I retrieved the container from the bin and tested it with a magnet, it is indeed steel. The white coating on the inside and the fragility/softness led me astray.

It did cause me to ponder why the mildly corrosive contents were packaged in a container that would be eaten away internally during prolonged storage.

I eventually found my can of Brasso which I should have used in the first place. It appears to be in good condition so today I can start on some more gauges to suit larger calibres.

* Danny M *

Michael Gilligan11/06/2019 05:58:35
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14135 forum posts
615 photos

Thanks for the confirmation, Danny yes

MichaelG.

.

Edit: I've just looked at a few versions of the MSDS, and all indicate that the liquid component is isopropanol

I suppose the corrosion mechanism might be specific to the ratio of product to airspace, in your part-used can.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 11/06/2019 06:12:35

Danny M2Z11/06/2019 09:49:30
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745 forum posts
278 photos

Today I made two more gauges successfully thankfully after a 'Baldrick Moment'.

He said inside my head, "Why not start with the big ones first, that way of you stuff one up you can make it into the next size down?"

Now why didn't I think of that?

I shall post a photo when all 7 gauges are completed. Apart from the 0.224" which suits rimfire and the various .22" centerfire calibres a decent set should contain 0.243" (6mm nominal), 25 calibre (0.257" 0.263" (6.5mm nominal), 0.277" (.270" nominal), 0.284" (7mm nominal) and 30 calibre (0.308" diameter) which covers about 99% of the competition shooters at our local range.

I also plan to make a nice case for the set with a few spare empty holes marked 0.311" and 0.338"

* Danny M *

Just terminated a grinning 'winky"

Edited By Danny M2Z on 11/06/2019 09:51:19

SillyOldDuffer11/06/2019 10:38:06
4785 forum posts
1011 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 11/06/2019 05:58:35:

Thanks for the confirmation, Danny yes

MichaelG.

.

Edit: I've just looked at a few versions of the MSDS, and all indicate that the liquid component is isopropanol

I suppose the corrosion mechanism might be specific to the ratio of product to airspace, in your part-used can.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 11/06/2019 06:12:35

Fascinating!

My hypothesis: over several years the Isopropyl Alcohol escaped through a not-quite-sealed cap and was replaced by damp air. Differences between day and night temperatures caused the can to breath and it gradually collected enough water from the air to form an oxygen rich pool on top of the hardened polish. Maybe the tin layer was nicked, maybe there's something in the polish that dissolves in water making it acid enough to attack tin, but an active corrosive layer formed at the interface and cut the bottom off.

For the very lazy, its a neat alternative to a hacksaw...

Dave

mark costello 111/06/2019 17:22:25
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547 forum posts
12 photos

A little bit of cling wrap or transfer to a small glass jar solves the problem. And ,yes, My picture is under the word "skint" in the dictionary.

Nigel Graham 211/06/2019 17:52:27
427 forum posts

Today - a trip to the doctor to confirm ultrasound results were clear so I don't have a thrombosis after my knee replacement.

Am slowly starting to become more mobile but am still on crutches, so my expeditions down the garden to the workshop are to still just refill the bird-feeder. Eating me out of house and home they are, the sparrows.

Still learning TurboCAD, but as the steam-wagon's part-finished cylinders and engine base-plate sit accusingly on the table next to the PC, this enforced indoor-engineering seems a good opportunity to use the former to assess what's next on the latter. (No original drawings exist.)

Or I could think the best approach to moving the Myford gear-box from the box under the settee, to the lathe itself. Not wanting to risk modifying the existing lead-screw, do I try to make the replacement, using the Harrison lathe; or try to obtain one second-hand?

Meanwhile, time to eat me out of house and home....

Cornish Jack11/06/2019 21:26:38
944 forum posts
127 photos

More a matter of the last week or so, watching the start of 37 million quids worth of trying to modify Nature - or, to be precise, the North Norfolk coast. The antics of the accompanying twin-hulled tow craft are quite amazing. one hopes the results will help to avoid a repeat of the 2013 'excitement' !!

img_9161a.jpg

img_9164a.jpg

rgds

Bill

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