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What Did You Do Today 2019

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mechman4803/01/2019 20:29:11
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2198 forum posts
370 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 03/01/2019 19:12:02:
Posted by mechman48 on 03/01/2019 18:57:31:


The digi gauge showing discrepancy of 1 minute...

Can't complain at the 1st attempt though. Comments / tips welcomed...

George.

.

Looks good, George ... but I wonder

Have you tried 'rotating' the gauge and reading from t'other side ?

... The readings should, of course, add up to exactly 90°, and a discrepancy would demonstrate a limitation in the resolution/accuracy/repeatability of the digital gauge.

MichaelG.

Thanks for the tip... just been out & tried it t'other way...180*

home made angle plate 45 deg (4).jpg

Bang on 45*… + 45*.1" = 90*.1' … 1" total discrepancy...

So … "a discrepancy would demonstrate a limitation in the resolution/accuracy/repeatability of the digital gauge"... so for a hobbyist work shop ...yes

No doubt purists will comment.

George.

mechman4804/01/2019 22:32:20
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2198 forum posts
370 photos

Made a couple more angle plates today, a 30*- 60* & a 70* - 20*…

home made angle plates 2 more.jpg

George.

Michael Gilligan04/01/2019 23:42:20
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12306 forum posts
538 photos

Great stuff, George

MichaelG.

Paul Lousick05/01/2019 00:38:12
912 forum posts
405 photos

The GemRed web site for digital angle gauges specifies a resolution of 0.1° and a repeatability of ±0.1°. You would need a sine gauge for anything more accurate.

Edited By Paul Lousick on 05/01/2019 00:40:31

Michael Gilligan05/01/2019 00:45:54
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12306 forum posts
538 photos
Posted by Paul Lousick on 05/01/2019 00:38:12:

The GemRed web site for digital angle gauges specifies a resolution of 0.1° and a repeatability of ±0.1°. You would need a sine gauge for anything more accurate.

Edited By Paul Lousick on 05/01/2019 00:40:31

.

So presumably George is actually displaying 45.1 degrees, and 45.0 degrees

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 05/01/2019 00:49:01

Brian H05/01/2019 08:09:51
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961 forum posts
74 photos

Broke a 10BA tap today, that the third tap I,ve broken in 60 years! The last one was also 10BA and the first one was 1/4" Whit on the end of a 4ft long tap wrench in the crown of a 12" piston.

Brian

roy entwistle05/01/2019 08:55:08
906 forum posts

Brian H

Clumsy cheeky

mechman4805/01/2019 16:44:08
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2198 forum posts
370 photos

Digi readings as displayed for the later two angle plates …

60* side...
home made angle plates 30 .60(1).jpg

30* side …
home made angle plates 30.60 (2).jpg

so; 59.9* + 30.1* = 90 *

20* side...

homemade angle pl;ates 70.20 (1).jpg

70* side …

homemade angle pl;ates 70.20 (2).jpg

so 70* + 20.1 = 90.1* I'm contributing the 0.1' discrepancy in all down to the digi gauge +/- 0.1* as mentioned by
Paul Lousic's post …

''The GemRed web site for digital angle gauges specifies a resolution of 0.1° and a repeatability of ±0.1°. You would need a sine gauge for anything more accurate''.


Just in case the question is asked I zero the digi gauge before readings on ea. side...

home made angle plate digi gauge zeroed out.jpg

So now that I've refreshed my old grey matter with trigonometry workings I'm a happy bunny... now on to a couple more - 5*-10*-15*- 25* using the same methodology... face 20 … don't think I need to post on the rest.

George.

DrDave06/01/2019 17:21:48
146 forum posts
30 photos

Reading Mr Cutwel’s latest caralogue that arrived recently, I noticed that one of their indexable face mills is advertised as having “hugh feed rates”. This means a feed of 1.0 to 1.5 mm per tooth in carbon & alloy steels. I suspect that my little Sieg mill might not be up to that!

Mick Charity06/01/2019 17:42:08
322 forum posts
4 photos
Posted by DrDave on 06/01/2019 17:21:48:

Reading Mr Cutwel’s latest caralogue that arrived recently, I noticed that one of their indexable face mills is advertised as having “hugh feed rates”. This means a feed of 1.0 to 1.5 mm per tooth in carbon & alloy steels. I suspect that my little Sieg mill might not be up to that!

I suspect that you're right.

There are many factors involved in metal removal rates, yet real world physics plays the biggest, but perhaps the most ignored part !

mechman4806/01/2019 18:51:40
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2198 forum posts
370 photos

Finished off the set of angle plates; all within 0.1* according to my digi gauge...just need a bit more polish up...

angle plates (2).jpg

George.

Joseph Noci 108/01/2019 17:15:04
423 forum posts
795 photos

Completed my Drill Alignment microscope jig to align drills in my 4 facet grinding jig ( previously posted on).

The optical head is a Bausch and Lomb Zoom microscope, and I fitted a horizontal reticule in the right eyepiece after some advise and guidance from Robert Atkinson - Thanks Robert!

The 5C collet in a square block holder sits on a focusing stage as seen.

microscope side view1.jpg

microscope end view.jpg

microscope front view.jpg

The focusing stage - drill end view

focusing stage view.jpg

Focusing stage - side view

focusing stage side view.jpg

Th reticule is a plastic ring sized to fit inside a threaded reticule holder that screws into the underside of the eye piece. A single fibre of fibreglass was teased from some weave, and superglued to the 180deg apart slots made in the sides of the plastic ring. The ring then inserted in the holder and screwed into the eye piece until focused.

reticle ring.jpg

View ( focus was difficult..) of the fibre reticule in place, from the bottom of the eye piece.

ring in eye peice.jpg

View through the microscope, focused on a 3mm drill, showing the reticule.

The camera was difficult to focus, being handheld, so the drill image is not that clear - it is VERY sharp when eye viewed.

The difficult part in the construction was getting the microscope sight-line horizontal and in line with the drill point at all focus ranges and zoom settings.

reticle view1.jpg

This at lowest zoom setting - at full zoom the 3mm drill fills just over half the image

reticle view2.jpg

Then I added a micrometer to the drill grinding stage on the grinder to be able to minutely advance the drill to grind the primary facet - I was using the X slide to do that, but with small drills ( sub 2mm) the movement is difficult to keep fine. The micrometer makes it a doddle!

grinding stage micrometer1.jpg

grinding stage micrometer2.jpg

grinding stage micrometer3.jpg

Makes sharpening drills a pleasure!

Joe

Neil Wyatt08/01/2019 18:50:54
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15224 forum posts
648 photos
72 articles

Just to be pedantic 0.1 degree on a wixey type gauge is six minutes.

A 0.1 degree error is only 1.7 thou per inch, or about 3 thou over the width of the gauge.

Neil

mechman4808/01/2019 21:08:16
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2198 forum posts
370 photos

Thanks Neil; I'll not worry over 1.7 thou' per inch in what I do

Geo.

ChrisH11/01/2019 10:28:24
783 forum posts
12 photos

Yesterday morning early my daughter was driving to work along the dual carriageway from Guildford to Alton and spotted a car head first into the ditch, obviously been there a little while as the windows were all frosted over.

She phoned 101 and they said yes, they'd had numerous calls re the incident already. So daughter asked if anybody was going to check if anyone was inside. Their reply stunned her. Yes, they said, they would do if they had anyone available, or if they had anyone driving by they would ask them to check it out. Absolutely disgraceful.

So what happens if there is anyone inside unable to summon help themselves? Tough luck it seems, hope they don't die before anyone can be bothered to check.

Moral of the story is, don't get into any difficulty and go off the road, at night and in freezing conditions especially, but if you do, don't expect help to arrive anytime soon.

Welcome to todays not-so-great anymore Britain.

 

 

Edited By ChrisH on 11/01/2019 10:30:11

duncan webster11/01/2019 10:53:55
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1817 forum posts
31 photos

Joseph, I've puzzled about this for a long time. As soon as you grind even the smallest amount off the end of the drill, it's cutting edge is no longer horizontal. Shouldn't you set it so that after a known cut the edge will be horizontal? Of course that implies knowing the helix angle and they are not all the same. I asked DG Brown the same question once and he replied you should set it as I suggest and that you soon learned by experience how much to set it off horizontal.

Joseph Noci 111/01/2019 11:29:41
423 forum posts
795 photos

Duncan, you are quite correct. I try now to do as you say - If the grind is just a 'touch up', I align and grind the secondary facet, and then re- align to do the primary, especially on the drills smaller than 3mm or so. If the drill end is bad, I hack it off-hand to be rid of the chipped parts, etc, then align and grind a secondary, and then re-align and redo the secondary, and re-align and do the primary. It sounds tedious but at least with this microscope jig its quick to align.

I suspect I ( you and I?) are/am being over-fussy, since the many 4-facet jigs built by many folk seem to work ok? gadgetBuilder et-al seem to have working devices and they do not bother with the error. I suspect though they are all just 'sharpening', not regrinding!

I guess it all depends on how much you are taking off of the tip.

Joe

Neil Wyatt11/01/2019 12:37:10
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Moderator
15224 forum posts
648 photos
72 articles
Posted by ChrisH on 11/01/2019 10:28:24:

Yesterday morning early my daughter was driving to work along the dual carriageway from Guildford to Alton and spotted a car head first into the ditch, obviously been there a little while as the windows were all frosted over.

She phoned 101 and they said yes, they'd had numerous calls re the incident already. So daughter asked if anybody was going to check if anyone was inside. Their reply stunned her. Yes, they said, they would do if they had anyone available, or if they had anyone driving by they would ask them to check it out. Absolutely disgraceful.

So what happens if there is anyone inside unable to summon help themselves? Tough luck it seems, hope they don't die before anyone can be bothered to check.

Moral of the story is, don't get into any difficulty and go off the road, at night and in freezing conditions especially, but if you do, don't expect help to arrive anytime soon.

Welcome to todays not-so-great anymore Britain.

Edited By ChrisH on 11/01/2019 10:30:11

A Scottish couple died after being left unfound in a car which had gone through a hedge a year or two ago.

I saw a car embedded in a fence near where I live in icy weather about a year ago. I stopped and there appeared to be someone hunched over the wheel. I opened the door to find it was an airbag, just as the driver got out the back seat and made me jump out of my skin!

Neil

Colin Heseltine11/01/2019 21:26:08
219 forum posts
52 photos

Spent the day trying to use Turbocad Pro 2018. Took me all day before I could get a pipe flange to look vaguely like the video tutorial said it should. BIgger screen, newer eyes and not being Red/Green colour blind might help.

Colin

ChrisH11/01/2019 21:56:17
783 forum posts
12 photos

Neil - my point entirely re the Scottish couple, tragic we can as a country afford all sorts of vanity projects but not have the funds to properly fund our emergency dervices. Probably two unnecessary deaths there.

Can appreciate your panic when you came across your incident, would scare the life out of most folk, and you being such a sober stoic sort of bloke too!

Chris

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