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Ever seen this "Drill Pad" as described by Workshop Practice Series?

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Ross Lloyd 117/12/2018 13:48:43
152 forum posts
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Hi

I am working through the Workshop Practice Series, the one on lathework, and the author dropped this interesting bit of info. He suggests, in the absence of an alternate drilling option, to use a "drill pad" on the lathe cross-slide. However when I search google for a 'drill pad' (or alternatives like lathe drill clamp, lathe cross slide drill clamp, lathe drilling attachment), I see devices that are nothing like that shown in the picture:

**LINK**

Now, I have a milling machine I can drill the holes with, but I am intrigued by this. Is there some other name for it? Is it just a clamp of some kind? Or just a milling slide for a lathe with a parallel clamp to hold the piece?

Edited By Ross Lloyd 1 on 17/12/2018 13:58:58

Neil Wyatt17/12/2018 14:19:05
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A 'Drill pad' is just any device to support work so it can be drilled accurately.

Another style is a circular block with a v across it and a hole in the middle (like a bench block) fitted to the tailstock.

As they are generally used by amateurs with limited budgets/equipment they tend to be home made, rather than purchased.

Neil

ega17/12/2018 14:26:36
1184 forum posts
97 photos

I had an arrangement similar to the link on my vertical slide. Some vertical slides incorporate a vee between the tee slots.

The tailstock device mentioned by Neil Wyatt has the advantage that holes are automatically on centre.

Clive Brown 117/12/2018 14:33:28
234 forum posts
7 photos

I have one that came with a Grayson lathe purchased in the '70s. Can't remember ever using it!

Pete Rimmer17/12/2018 16:00:31
334 forum posts
11 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 17/12/2018 14:19:05:

Another style is a circular block with a v across it and a hole in the middle (like a bench block) fitted to the tailstock.

Neil

Also known as a 'crotch centre'.

larry phelan 117/12/2018 16:55:58
436 forum posts
11 photos

Hate the sound of that last one Neil ! ouch !!frown

Ross Lloyd 117/12/2018 23:41:29
152 forum posts
1 photos

Thanks all

I ended up kind of wishing I had a drill pad. His approach in the book would have made the subsequent operations much more straightfoward. That said I got to play with my mill a bit more which was nice, I just havent bought a vice yet so made life a bit harder for myself. Still, the part is looking ok so far, very rewarding experience.

Thanks again

Nicholas Farr17/12/2018 23:49:36
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Hi Ross, take a look at **LINK**

Regards Nick.

Hopper18/12/2018 00:47:16
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3651 forum posts
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The one in the pic looks dead simple to make. Two pieces of bright mild steel screwed together to make a T piece. A hole first bored in one piece in the lathe to accommodate the toolpost mounting stud. Then mount the T in position, hold a milling cutter in the lathe chuck and mill the groove across the face. A nice afternoon's work.

It has the advantage over the tailstock mounted type in that you can drill a series of holes at precision centre distances using the cross slide scale, all in a nice straight line, all dead in the middle of the workpiece.

You could make an even simpler one by mounting a piece of square bar in the normal toolpost and milling a groove along it.

Edited By Hopper on 18/12/2018 00:48:43

John Reese18/12/2018 02:44:40
746 forum posts

I had one that mounted to the tailstock. Never used it after I got a drill press.

I would imagine those that a drill pad attached to the carriage would be be limited to the smaller drills. You can't develop nearly the thrust using the carriage as you can using the tailstock.

not done it yet18/12/2018 12:15:15
3028 forum posts
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Posted by John Reese on 18/12/2018 02:44:40:

I had one that mounted to the tailstock. Never used it after I got a drill press.

I would imagine those that a drill pad attached to the carriage would be be limited to the smaller drills. You can't develop nearly the thrust using the carriage as you can using the tailstock.

I would expect that, with a bit of thought and maybe ingenuity, the carrige could be shifted using the tailstock?

Nigel McBurney 118/12/2018 14:14:49
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573 forum posts
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I have a vee pad that fits my Colchester tailstock, very good for quickly drilling split pin holes central in clevis pins,and pins found on stationary engines eg valve rocker pivots,governor pivots etc, Headed small clevis pins such as found on classic m/cycle brake linkages will not sit in the vee,so I drill the rod before it is machined down to form the head,Before I found my tailstock pad I used to mount an old angle plate on the Myford cross slide,the plate had a vee machined at centre height,I usually hold the pins in place with a toolmakers clamp. The cross slide method does allow two or more cross holes to be drilled parallel to each other,looks better if the split pins are in line,

Mike Poole18/12/2018 14:56:07
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1967 forum posts
46 photos

Hemingway Kits can supply the kit to make a cross drilling jig which a drill pad is very useful for and is the task shown in the picture. As a guide bush is also included it can be vey useful on a drill press as well. Very little setting up is required so it may be quicker for cross drilling than machines with the luxury of a DRO. **LINK**

Mike

Vic18/12/2018 17:56:41
2106 forum posts
10 photos

I’m a bit surprised that these things exist as a bench drill is very often the first machine tool that folks buy. smiley

Hopper18/12/2018 22:48:05
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Posted by Vic on 18/12/2018 17:56:41:

I’m a bit surprised that these things exist as a bench drill is very often the first machine tool that folks buy. smiley

I think their history goes back to the days when a drill press was a very expensive item and the trusty Myford lathe was used for everything in the workshop, drilling included.

I would guess you would almost have to have the Myford-style handwheel on the main leadscrew to develop enough force for drilling. Seems the carriage handwheel would not give the force needed for any but the smallest of holes in soft material.

Today, probably the main attraction of such an attachment would be its ability to drill multiple holes in a dead straight line, at precise intervals set by the cross slide graduations.

Michael Gilligan18/12/2018 23:19:42
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13290 forum posts
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Posted by ega on 17/12/2018 14:26:36:

The tailstock device mentioned by Neil Wyatt has the advantage that holes are automatically on centre.

.

Nice exaple of one in use here: **LINK**

https://watchmaking.weebly.com/collet-holding-block.html

... on a Cowells 90CW lathe.

.

MichaelG.

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