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ww1 artillery build

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JasonB05/12/2018 08:34:45
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Moderator
14000 forum posts
1315 photos

Michael, even the usually poor forum search threw up two results which must be a firstwink

Mal, will you be painting up teh Minnie like this model Fowler?

wd fowler.jpg

Michael Gilligan05/12/2018 08:35:56
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12025 forum posts
522 photos

surprise

Ron Laden05/12/2018 08:58:41
669 forum posts
98 photos

I do like the Fowler modelled in a military finish, I think that looks really excellent.

Interesting how the gun has traction engine type wheels, I guess in those days if large wheels were needed for heavy equipment that was the way to go.

Mick B105/12/2018 09:31:58
797 forum posts
47 photos

Oh gawd! All those rivets! All that drilling!

I think, if I ever get round to it, I'll try something like a 6- or 17-pounder from WW2 instead... blush

Brian H05/12/2018 10:04:55
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918 forum posts
74 photos

I found it interesting to note that the wheels on the full sized one in Michaels link has the strakes running the same way, could this be something to do with the way the gun recoils?

Brian

JasonB05/12/2018 10:08:52
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14000 forum posts
1315 photos

Or could be that it did not have anyone riding on it to get shaken to bits, the angled strakes ensure that one is always in contact with the ground so you get a smoother ride.

SillyOldDuffer05/12/2018 10:34:12
3502 forum posts
673 photos
Posted by Ron Laden on 05/12/2018 08:58:41:

...

Interesting how the gun has traction engine type wheels, I guess in those days if large wheels were needed for heavy equipment that was the way to go.

Large wheels were essential on the mostly unmetalled and potholed roads of the day. Only towns were likely to have paved surfaces. Off road it was vital to have wheels that resisted sinking into soft ground as well as being able to move over rough ground. Traction engine wheels were the best option before technology produced big pneumatic tyres and caterpillar tracks. Traction wheels were far from ideal and they became deeply unpopular as soon as roads improved. They rip good road surfaces into shreds.

Dave

SillyOldDuffer05/12/2018 10:47:36
3502 forum posts
673 photos
Posted by JasonB on 05/12/2018 10:08:52:

Or could be that it did not have anyone riding on it to get shaken to bits, ...

During WW2 the US Army suffered mass casualties due to a condition called 'Jeep Bottom'. Travelling long distances on hard badly vibrating jeep seats caused sores serious enough to require hospitalisation. Ouch!

Dave

JasonB05/12/2018 11:01:30
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Moderator
14000 forum posts
1315 photos

Not all used large wheels, but maybe that's why they lost?

Here and again here

derek hall 105/12/2018 12:02:09
26 forum posts

"Jeep Bottom"....... the things you learn about on a Model Engineering Forumsurprise

XD 35105/12/2018 23:02:00
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1101 forum posts
52 photos

I reckon the guys in this video came away with "Jeep Bottom " and probably a few other serious injuries !

**LINK**

mal webber06/12/2018 00:01:37
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38 forum posts
76 photos

Thanks Jason ,Michael for the links, very helpful and interesting reading in more ways than one, that model is very nice and well made and gives me some thing to work to and may be improve on in some places, Jason that fowler and colours would suite the howitzer down to a T , i have already started this build so will see it out now till the finish when ever that may be ,think i'll start a build thread on this and see how i get on with what i have to work from

Tanks Mal.

Ian S C06/12/2018 09:18:42
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7110 forum posts
227 photos

XD 351, the Jeeps in the video were taking part in the acceptance trials(can't remember the name of the place), there was a whole lot more than driving over what looks like giant roofing iron, and no seat belts there, but maybe the drivers and crews came from the cavalry. Designed by the Bantam Car Co, the company who made the Austen 7 in USA.

Ian S C

XD 35106/12/2018 13:11:20
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1101 forum posts
52 photos

The guy in the back hanging onto the spare wheel cracked me up ! I have seen a few of these videos where the look of terror on the faces of some of the passengers is priceless !

One thing for certain Mal is you arein for a riveting experience !

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