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Washing machine motor

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Ian Skeldon 230/11/2018 10:12:35
540 forum posts
54 photos

Hi,

This is at the moment a theoretical question, I have been given an old hotpoint washing machine (about eight years old) because it has corroded around the door seal and leaks like a good un. The motor does run nicely.

Is there any value in removing the motor for future workshop use? If so do I need to take out all of the wiring and use it as is or can I simply find which wires I can connect straight up to 240v? I realise this will give a single speed by the way but is it worth the effort or do I just give the scrap man a call?

PS I do have a muli-meter and at the moment haven't looked to see if it's brushed or brushless.

Thanks for any opinions on this.

Nick Clarke 330/11/2018 10:28:28
avatar
1394 forum posts
61 photos

At that age the motor almost certainly uses brushes.

It may not be single speed as washing machines do run at several speeds, but as for connections I have no idea

Oldiron30/11/2018 10:43:45
963 forum posts
40 photos

A spare motor is always useful. Could be used for a belt sander or a wire brush spindle both of which I have built using washing machine motors. Plenty of video's on YouTube how to wire them up whether they are 3/5 or 7 wire units. Just take the attached plug and as long a length of the cable you can get to.

regards

J Hancock30/11/2018 10:48:38
832 forum posts

In a workshop that type of motor is a 'death trap' waiting to happen.

My vote, bin it.

AJW30/11/2018 11:06:30
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377 forum posts
137 photos
Washing machine motors used to be great, typically 1/4 or 1/3 hp Hoover type induction motors - ideal for lathes, mills etc.
Modern motors are very clever at being able to run at a variety of speeds/directions but you need all the electronics to control it, plus they are very 'open frame' having the ability to let in vast amounts of swarf and dirt plus of course, fingers!
Think I would give it a miss!

Alan
John Rudd30/11/2018 11:45:46
1452 forum posts
10 photos

There's no reason not to use it as the motive power for a sawbench....

If you can identify the wires for the field winding and brush connections.....there's usually a tachogenerator on the end of the nde of the motor casing...not needed....as for open frame, well nowt wrong with a few bits of perspex for makeshift covers.....Depends on how creative and adventurous you are.....

john fletcher 130/11/2018 11:49:57
785 forum posts

A few years ago there was an article in MEW magazine on the wiring and alterations needed to use these modern brush motors in the workshop. Unfortunately they armature etc are fully exposed and are noisy at 1500rpm. The older Hoover induction motors were different, fully enclosed 1425 rpm and would run quietly all day.

not done it yet30/11/2018 12:17:26
6736 forum posts
20 photos

Have to disagree with John and the sawbench idea as it might drive a tiny blade - but most sawbench motors will be about three times more powerful and probably a lot more.

Yes to a belt sander, but not too hefty on belt size.

Low power motors are abundant and cheap, so the cost of safey screening might exceed the cost of a normal second hand item.

Tumble dryer motors may be a simpler option for a low power drive.

Pete Berry30/11/2018 14:01:47
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28 forum posts
7 photos

I have used a washing machine motor to provide a variable speed drive for my milling machine. I designed a back gear gear box which can be interchanged with the original induction motor. I built a new control board from an article in M E or NEW some years ago. Most of these motor have a tacho which will increase motor torque to maintain motor speed under load. If you interrested I can find the artical when I return home next week.

Regards Pete

Ian Skeldon 230/11/2018 14:07:34
540 forum posts
54 photos

A good variety of opinions and suggestions for possible uses then, that's reassuring. Pete I would welcom anything useful and relavent to this task. I do take note of the cautions mentioned and would make sure that fire risk and risk of injury or harm is minimised.

Thank you to all contributors,

Ian

Pete Berry30/11/2018 16:46:49
avatar
28 forum posts
7 photos

Hi Ian, I will resort out the info next week.

larry phelan 101/12/2018 10:53:39
1172 forum posts
15 photos

I used to think that way too,at one time,but proper motors are easy enough to come by,so not worth the trouble.

As for using them on a saw bench ?????? You must be joking !!,nothing less than 1/2 hp would be any use for that,and then T,E,F,C.

Give it a new home------in the dump.

Ian McVickers01/12/2018 11:00:10
222 forum posts
110 photos

Washing machine motors are usually brush and open frame meaning they are not suitable for a workshop environment where it could attract dust and crap. Imagine say a sawbench creating fine dust and it settling around the commutator on the motor which is sparking away nicely when the motor is running. Bin it and get a motor suited for the application.

Carl Wilson 401/12/2018 11:09:55
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670 forum posts
53 photos
Agreed. They are suitable for only one application which is the one that they are designed for. The be inside a washing machine.

They are built to a budget for a very specific application. So they aren't really generic drive motors in the way an AC induction motor is.

As wasteful as it seems, the safe and best option is to recycle the whole machine. The motor will then be dealt with appropriately and may end up as a spare to repair someone else's machine.
John Rudd01/12/2018 13:33:24
1452 forum posts
10 photos
Posted by Ian McVickers on 01/12/2018 11:00:10:

Washing machine motors are usually brush and open frame meaning they are not suitable for a workshop environment where it could attract dust and crap. Imagine say a sawbench creating fine dust and it settling around the commutator on the motor which is sparking away nicely when the motor is running. Bin it and get a motor suited for the application.

Plenty of examples on Youtube where they have been used for powering a disc sander...

 

But I guess its what ever you are comfortable with...

Edited By John Rudd on 01/12/2018 13:34:15

Michael Gilligan01/12/2018 14:19:31
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20090 forum posts
1041 photos
Posted by Ian McVickers on 01/12/2018 11:00:10:

Washing machine motors are usually brush

.

Really ?

MichaelG.

.

P.S. I do agree, of course, with your comment about the risk associated with open frames.

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