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G-Code editor with back plotting

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Eckart Hartmann 102/10/2018 15:31:06
4 forum posts

Not sure if I should tag onto this post but it already has G-Code experts on it. I am looking for a plain G-Code editor with back plotting. i.e. I type in the code and it displays as a line drawing what the machine will do. Up to now I am using jViewer but there are a lot of codes it does not know about and I believe its development was abandoned long ago. I have evaluated GWizard but I am not willing to pay their asking price since it has some bugs and they seem to be not interested in fixing the bugs. I have tried Predator but their version with back plotting is over $500. Can anyone recommend a fully working application for £200 or less?

 

Edited By JasonB on 02/10/2018 16:09:19

mike T02/10/2018 17:07:00
165 forum posts
1 photos

I have been using DesKAM 2000 by Carken for the last 18 years and would not change it. DesKAM 2000 creates G code toolpaths with a backplot from a .DXF file. It's old software which runs well on my Win XP machine. If, you can find a download of this rather old software you will not be disappointed.

Edited By mike T on 02/10/2018 17:08:11

John Haine02/10/2018 17:23:51
2412 forum posts
132 photos

You could look at Camotics ? I have used it a bit and it seems to do the job.

Andrew Johnston02/10/2018 17:26:38
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4492 forum posts
520 photos

I mostly use CAM to generate my G-code, writing by hand once in a blue moon. However, experience says that the toolpath the CAM program thinks it is following isn't always the one followed by the G-code it generates.

So I use a backplotting program to display the toolpath direct from the saved G-code as a sanity check. I use NCPlot which costs $299, after a short free trial. The loaded G-code is in a text editor, and I have editted the code from time to time, mostly associated with tool changes which don't affect the toolpath. I've just had a play and edits to codes like G00 or G01 do show up on the graphical display provided you do a plot refresh.

Andrew

Involute Curve02/10/2018 17:51:07
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326 forum posts
84 photos

I used to use a program called NC plot, it had a nice editor and allowed for easy back plotting, I have a copy of the program installer but it dates back to 2006, I haven't run on later operating systems, I think its share or freeware, it had a nag screen that disappeared on click, pm me and ill send it to you.

 

Shaun

I just googled it its still available in a newer version, but its no longer free 

 

Edited By Involute Curve on 02/10/2018 17:55:34

blowlamp02/10/2018 17:58:48
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1171 forum posts
82 photos

I've been using NC Corrector for 4 or 5 years now to good effect.

Totally free too!

Martin.

Muzzer02/10/2018 18:09:28
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2904 forum posts
448 photos

This is pretty good. ncviewer Opens in a browser and you can simply drag and drop your file into the window. Written by an intern with Autodesk - I think you can be certain he was offered a job afterwards.

If you created your g code in Fusion 360, it has some very powerful plotting functions and stuff like tool / holder / workholder clash detection.

Murray

Edited By Muzzer on 02/10/2018 18:10:10

blowlamp02/10/2018 18:47:20
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1171 forum posts
82 photos

Actually, now I think about it, you can probably use PlanetCNC TNG machine controller to both program and give a graphical display of the workpiece (available here)

It should work with both miller and lathe gcode.

Martin.

Marcus Bowman02/10/2018 22:50:44
158 forum posts

Taking a different approach, you could use LinuxCNC on a basic Linux machine, and simply run it unconnected, or run it in demo mode. The main window has a decent backplot display.

One thing, though: each implementation of G Code is in some way specific to the system it runs on. So Mach3 has one set of G Codes, Fanuc has another, and LinuxCNC has yet another. The issue is not with the basic core of codes, which they all recognise and interpret in much the same way, but the enhancements and the differences in syntax and program structure. Subroutines, for example, are structured differently and occupy a different position within different flavours of G Code. Mach 3 has no real flow control codes for logic, whereas LinuxCNC has many; and so on. So you would need a backplotter which suits the variant of G Code you want to use.

Marcus

Rod Ashton03/10/2018 06:08:07
280 forum posts
12 photos

Tried Camotics out of interest. Could anyone advise why nothing appears in the simulation screen even though my code is running and the code is viewable on the code screen?

Eckart Hartmann 116/10/2018 23:29:55
4 forum posts

Hi All and thanks for the input. I have been sidetracked into building my boiler but will definitely seriously look at the suggestions when I need to do some milling again.

Regards EckartH

Eckart Hartmann 109/11/2018 22:08:44
4 forum posts

I now looked at the above suggestions but none meets my needs. None of them updates the backplot as I type the code. All need a manual update action to see what progress or errors I have made. This might seem a small issue but becomes very tedious if entering a significant program. NCPlot comes the closest needing only one button click or F9 key to update. But at $300 it is too expensive with this issue. The rest seem to need many clicks to update. For now I will stick to jViewer for most code and use one of the cumbersome options (maybe Mach4) when I really need codes not supported by jViewer.

blowlamp10/11/2018 00:12:34
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1171 forum posts
82 photos
Posted by Eckart Hartmann 1 on 09/11/2018 22:08:44:

I now looked at the above suggestions but none meets my needs. None of them updates the backplot as I type the code. All need a manual update action to see what progress or errors I have made. This might seem a small issue but becomes very tedious if entering a significant program. NCPlot comes the closest needing only one button click or F9 key to update. But at $300 it is too expensive with this issue. The rest seem to need many clicks to update. For now I will stick to jViewer for most code and use one of the cumbersome options (maybe Mach4) when I really need codes not supported by jViewer.

NC Corrector needs only a click to update and is free.

blowlamp10/11/2018 07:56:44
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1171 forum posts
82 photos

Can't you use a CAM system for what you need?

There are some good, affordable solutions out there now.

Martin.

Nick Hulme31/01/2019 20:02:39
629 forum posts
35 photos
Posted by Eckart Hartmann 1 on 09/11/2018 22:08:44:

I now looked at the above suggestions but none meets my needs. None of them updates the backplot as I type the code. All need a manual update action to see what progress or errors I have made. This might seem a small issue but becomes very tedious if entering a significant program. NCPlot comes the closest needing only one button click or F9 key to update. But at $300 it is too expensive with this issue. The rest seem to need many clicks to update. For now I will stick to jViewer for most code and use one of the cumbersome options (maybe Mach4) when I really need codes not supported by jViewer.

I think you're putting the cart before the horse, machinists who hand write code tend to do it at the machine where no plot is available, relying on knowing what they are doing.
Those, like me, who can't work at the machine for anything but fairly simple 2D and 2.5D generally use CAM.

Martin Connelly31/01/2019 20:14:34
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831 forum posts
93 photos

I work out paths using CAD, write the code in notepad, open it in Mach3 and check it looks good before putting it on a memory stick to take to the workshop. I don't wory about optimising for speed because mostly I am doing one offs. I use Mach3 turning wizards for a lot of basic operations on the lathe, I don't find the milling wizards much use as most of my work on the mill is manual data input. It's like manual milling without the need to wind handles.

Martin C

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